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Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound
Old 9th September 2020
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound

Hey all,

I'm a pianist looking for some advice from any of you who are well versed in grand piano recording - specifically for modern jazz trio work. The kind of sound I'm after is a pretty intimate, produced sound - think Esbjörn Svensson Trio etc. Full bodied, but not particularly roomy.

I'm working with a gorgeous Steinway Model O, albeit in a living room with wood floors. I've built 3 broadband absorbers (7ft tall X 4ft wide), to tame reflections and I'm currently tracking with some carpet underneath the piano too. I've found taking the lid off helpful in trying different mic positions, and generally I like the openness that lends to the sound - although I do wonder if the 8ft high untreated ceiling could be an issue. I can't attach any treatment to the ceiling in this room - though I'm open to creative solutions of suspending some treatment above the instrument if it would be worthwhile.

Mic setup as follows:

AEA R88 --> Phoenix DRSQ4-Mk II
Matched Pair DPA 2011c (Cardioids) -- > UA Apollo Unison Pres

I've done some experimenting, and so far I love the full body/warmth of the R88 close up - also gives a great stereo image, and to add some depth/space, I'm using the DPAs in ORTF and blending that in. Pictures below.

Here are my questions:

- Regardless of where I position the R88, so long as it's close up there's always a couple of notes that stick out as massively resonant. Is this always going to be an unavoidable issue using a ribbon so close to the strings? Or is there a workaround? If I pull back the mic I lose the intimacy/closeness that I like.

- The DPAs are wonderful in their own way, although much thinner sounding in this particular setting. I used to have them as a spaced pair over the hammers, but had all sorts of phase issues with that, so I'm now sticking to ORTF, DIN and XY configurations - the former two being my favourite because of the wider stereo image. The spaced pair was also giving me crazy resonances on whichever treble notes were nearest - I assume given the cardioid capsules. Would I be much better off with a set of omni capsules in general? What configuration/placement might best compliment the R88 as my main mic?

- Also would love to hear any ideas for a completely different approach with this same gear if you hate the look of what I've done so far

There are, of course, no right answers - but would appreciate any suggestions that might get me closer to the sound I’m after!

Cheers,

David
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 9th September 2020
  #2
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by maximumteatime View Post
- Regardless of where I position the R88, so long as it's close up there's always a couple of notes that stick out as massively resonant. Is this always going to be an unavoidable issue using a ribbon so close to the strings? Or is there a workaround? If I pull back the mic I lose the intimacy/closeness that I like.
If the R88 gets the sound you want except for those resonances, you might try using dynamic eq, something like the Fab Filter Pro-Q3, to only suck out some of the resonance when those particular frequencies bloom. I've been doing this more with upright bass and it can help lessen the resonance but still keep the sound full the rest of the time since the eq only reacts when the level hits your threshold. You could also try the R88 in the crook w/ the DPAs as close mics on the strings for the detail you'll lose by moving the R88.
Old 10th September 2020
  #3
The Fig 8 pattern is zooming in on what’s directly in front of each diaphragm (and also immediately behind it, fwiw) so you’ll need to come up to eliminate hot spots.

The room will also be resonant at certain frequencies, and if you’re finding those hot notes in the 200-400 Hz range, that is likely playing a part in it.

For live jazz piano with the rest of the ensemble around, I’m usually going for somewhere between an NOS and small AB pair of DPA 4011’s, which are definitely not a thin sounding mic, though quite sparkly. I think they are voodoo, and often worry how I’ll suffer In the afterlife for using them so liberally on jazz piano.

You can use point angle and spacing to control width and hot spotting. I’m usually around 10” and 45 degrees, over the midrange strings 6” or so in from the crook and 8-12” back from the hammers, with the mics pointed either straight down or slightly back depending on how Bright and/or out of tune the piano is, and how much I need to control bleed.

My ideal stereo jazz piano is ECM, but mic choice and circumstance usually dictate I can’t quite do that, but that’s still the tonality I’m going for:

https://youtu.be/JsTiwvyxrxI


Quote:
Originally Posted by maximumteatime View Post
Hey all,

I'm a pianist looking for some advice from any of you who are well versed in grand piano recording - specifically for modern jazz trio work. The kind of sound I'm after is a pretty intimate, produced sound - think Esbjörn Svensson Trio etc. Full bodied, but not particularly roomy.

I'm working with a gorgeous Steinway Model O, albeit in a living room with wood floors. I've built 3 broadband absorbers (7ft tall X 4ft wide), to tame reflections and I'm currently tracking with some carpet underneath the piano too. I've found taking the lid off helpful in trying different mic positions, and generally I like the openness that lends to the sound - although I do wonder if the 8ft high untreated ceiling could be an issue. I can't attach any treatment to the ceiling in this room - though I'm open to creative solutions of suspending some treatment above the instrument if it would be worthwhile.

Mic setup as follows:

AEA R88 --> Phoenix DRSQ4-Mk II
Matched Pair DPA 2011c (Cardioids) -- > UA Apollo Unison Pres

I've done some experimenting, and so far I love the full body/warmth of the R88 close up - also gives a great stereo image, and to add some depth/space, I'm using the DPAs in ORTF and blending that in. Pictures below.

Here are my questions:

- Regardless of where I position the R88, so long as it's close up there's always a couple of notes that stick out as massively resonant. Is this always going to be an unavoidable issue using a ribbon so close to the strings? Or is there a workaround? If I pull back the mic I lose the intimacy/closeness that I like.

- The DPAs are wonderful in their own way, although much thinner sounding in this particular setting. I used to have them as a spaced pair over the hammers, but had all sorts of phase issues with that, so I'm now sticking to ORTF, DIN and XY configurations - the former two being my favourite because of the wider stereo image. The spaced pair was also giving me crazy resonances on whichever treble notes were nearest - I assume given the cardioid capsules. Would I be much better off with a set of omni capsules in general? What configuration/placement might best compliment the R88 as my main mic?

- Also would love to hear any ideas for a completely different approach with this same gear if you hate the look of what I've done so far

There are, of course, no right answers - but would appreciate any suggestions that might get me closer to the sound I’m after!

Cheers,

David
Old 10th September 2020
  #4
Lives for gear
 
Bruce Watson's Avatar
 

Here's a link to an old SOS article on how to record piano. It's an exhaustive look at dozens and dozens of techniques. You should pay most attention to the section on close micing, in particular the section on inside the piano.

Small room sound is the logical consequence of recording in a small room. Nothing you can do about that, other than minimizing the sound of the room. That implies close micing the piano. My suggestion is, you aren't close enough yet. That ORTF pair is too high -- it'll be picking up rapid reflections from the ceiling that you don't want. And your ribbon mic, while an admirable try, can't really be used in close effectively because of its pattern.

If it were me (and I realize that it's not) I'd probably be looking at something like the Mirizio Microphone Mount, and a nice pair of omnis, Scheops CMC6-mk2 would probably be my first choice. If you just want to try it out to see what it sounds like, you could just lay a meter stick across the piano (or something longer, but you get the idea) and gaffer tape a couple of omni lav. mics to it, say DPA 4061s. This would let you "try before you buy" if you want.

And I would treat that ceiling if you can. You can build a frame to hold a sound panel or two just off the ceiling without touching it, so the ceiling treatment is actually floor mounted. It'll look something like a giant poster bed with your sound panel(s) laid across the top. You'll still be able to work around the piano fairly freely so you can just leave it there as long as you need to.

All this should result in a sound that is all piano and very little room. But you can EQ it, compress it, and add reverb to taste in post. Many jazz records have been made this way, more or less.
Old 10th September 2020
  #5
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Sharp11's Avatar
 

What Bruce said.

From the pics it appears you’ve essentially wedged the piano into a shoe box with a highly reflective surface just above it - perfect for the figure 8 ribbon mic to reinforce a reflection at certain frequencies.

Have you tried removing some or all of the panels and moved the ribbon mic away? I know you’re going for a close mic sound, but sometimes you have to let the space direct you.

In this space, I’d close mic with cardioids and use the panels to control spill into other instrument mics.

Also, when close mics are used, I prefer to keep the lid on, it’s easier to control those ceiling reflections. I hang a cloud over my piano as well ( made by real traps)
Old 10th September 2020
  #6
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jnorman's Avatar
Typical studio setup for jazz is a spaced pair of U87s 6-8” above the strings. Do not remove the lid - it is part of the sound of the instrument.
Old 11th September 2020
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman View Post
Typical studio setup for jazz is a spaced pair of U87s 6-8” above the strings. Do not remove the lid - it is part of the sound of the instrument.
full support for leaving the lid on: it's an integral part of the sound!

___


i'm mostly using a spaced pair of schoeps with mk21 or mk4 capsules (or a pair of c460b/ck61's, c414b-uls', oc818's, tlm170's or tlm107's) near the hammers and almost always a tlm170 in wide cardioid (or omni) with a steep lpf lower down the strings (see pics).

depending on piano/room/reflections/spill, i position mics even closer (as in this case which was a live mix/broadcast of iiro rantala's 'my finnish calendar') and of course i'm applying eq, dynamics and efx.

___


[some folks love using the dpa 4099's both in the studio and live - me not so much although i occasionally get 'forced' to using them when there's not enough time to swap mics during change-over between bands (when mixing live): i just had to use them with martin tingvall and imo they sound shrill no matter what amount of eq gets applied; hypercardioids imo don't fit well with grand piano's either]
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 12th September 2020
  #8
Here for the gear
 

Thanks all for your responses!

Realise there's a couple of things I should've mentioned - while I'm after this specific "trio" sound, I actually intend to be tracking a lot of solo work so I don't have other instruments to contend with in this space. Placement of those panels can be purely about getting the right piano sound.

Also, ideally I don't intend to splash out on more gear at the moment - the only thing I would consider *if* it solves my issue with these resonant notes is a set of omni capsules to swap out with the DPA cardioid capsules I already have. I'm really looking to utilise what I have in the best way possible, and to gain a deeper understanding of how to use these particular mics well in this scenario.

Also, I figured it'll be a lot more helpful if I include some audio with these questions, so I'll upload some clips shortly.

In response to your thoughts:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Watson
My suggestion is, you aren't close enough yet. That ORTF pair is too high -- it'll be picking up rapid reflections from the ceiling that you don't want. And your ribbon mic, while an admirable try, can't really be used in close effectively because of its pattern.
Thanks for the suggestions! Could you explain why the pattern of the ribbon isn't effective in this context? My idea was using proximity effect to get a warmer, fuller sound by being close up. I should mention I'm using it in Blumlein rather than M/S currently. Omni in close up would be better?

Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya
The room will also be resonant at certain frequencies, and if you’re finding those hot notes in the 200-400 Hz range, that is likely playing a part in it.
Hot notes are all in the top 2 octaves of the piano...particularly around 1.5-2k. I assume my DPA 2011s aren't worlds away from the 4011s...and I never considered them "thin" sounding until I put up this R88 on the same piano....will upload some audio to illustrate what I mean there.

Also love the avishai track you sent, thanks for sharing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharp11
Have you tried removing some or all of the panels and moved the ribbon mic away? I know you’re going for a close mic sound, but sometimes you have to let the space direct you.

In this space, I’d close mic with cardioids and use the panels to control spill into other instrument mics.
No other instrument mics to worry about, so panels can be wherever best for the piano. Have tried the R88 further away but given that it's blumlein, I was ending up with a completely skewed stereo image, and I can't wrap my head around how to match that with the DPAs which are "facing" the instrument from a completely different perspective.
Won't close miking with these cardioids give me phase issues? Or do you mean still as a coincident pair?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman
Do not remove the lid - it is part of the sound of the instrument.
Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah
full support for leaving the lid on: it's an integral part of the sound!
Interesting!! I've found very divided information over this - some folks suggest that it is an integral part of the instrument sound and should be left alone - others suggest that the lid's main function is to project the sound of a piano into a concert hall and amplify it over the orchestra, so sticking a bunch of mics right in close just means you have a ton more early reflections to consider.

All that said, I do realise in this small space that taking the lid off is actually just making my ceiling more of a factor to deal with, so I've now put it back on and am trying a new approach.

Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah
i'm mostly using a spaced pair of schoeps with mk21 or mk4 capsules (or a pair of c460b/ck61's, c414b-uls', OC818's, TLM170's or TLM107's) near the hammers and almost always a TLM170 in wide cardioid (or omni) with a steep lpf lower down the strings (see pics).
Thanks for these pictures, they're very helpful! Curious why you opted for spaced cardioids vs spaced omnis?

I guess this is the main thing I really want to clear up - is a spaced pair of omnis close in above the hammers going to be a much better move than spaced/coincident cardioids, or my R88? Thinking in terms of eliminating these hot notes, having good phase coherency, and complimenting the blumlein R88 if it's placed somewhere else?

Cheers!

D
Old 13th September 2020
  #9
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maximumteatime View Post
Thanks for these pictures, they're very helpful! Curious why you opted for spaced cardioids vs spaced omnis?

I guess this is the main thing I really want to clear up - is a spaced pair of omnis close in above the hammers going to be a much better move than spaced/coincident cardioids, or my R88? Thinking in terms of eliminating these hot notes, having good phase coherency, and complimenting the blumlein R88 if it's placed somewhere else?
they were wide cardioids in this case (mk21)...

...but the reason for using directional mics is pretty simple: i'm mostly interested in what's happening in front of mics and less around them, but certainly not behind them so i hardly ever use omnis in any application...

...and don't get me started on blumlein which adds phase-reversed rear pickup; my least-favourite of all mic techniques!

unless the piano was very poorly maintained/tuned, i've never had issues with 'hot notes', not even with mics even closer (see pic of the 414's below which were used in cardioid*): with the lid on, you get so much sound boucing around, reflections and refraction of all sorts that any minor emphasis on or off-axis gets smoothed - hence my quote that the lid is an integral part of the sound and is responsible for far more than just projecting sound into the audience! you get a far different blend of direct sound, early reflections and room sound with a lid on the large stick than without the lid, regardless of room/hall...

this goes not only for the mics but the the pianists: i have yet to come across a single pianist which prefers the sound of the piano without a lid (in which case i of cause would try to catch it accordingly)!

* the pic with the neumann mics (cardioid as well) show al schmitt's take on things, not mine - but while we're at it: for a slightly 'less-modern' sound, i often use a pair of ldc's too but in a pseudo-x/y configuration with one mic pointing more towards the low strings/side/lid of the piano; i might add a pic (if i can find one)...
Attached Thumbnails
Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound-20190125_091005.jpg   Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound-20190925_094409.jpg  

Last edited by deedeeyeah; 13th September 2020 at 12:21 PM.. Reason: minor edits and typo
Old 13th September 2020
  #10
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Sharp11's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maximumteatime View Post



No other instrument mics to worry about, so panels can be wherever best for the piano. Have tried the R88 further away but given that it's blumlein, I was ending up with a completely skewed stereo image, and I can't wrap my head around how to match that with the DPAs which are "facing" the instrument from a completely different perspective.
Won't close miking with these cardioids give me phase issues? Or do you mean still as a coincident pair?



Cheers!

D
In my 325 square foot piano room, I record my Yamaha C5 one of three ways: a pair of Neumann km 184s either spaced pair or xy; a pair of large condensers, usually spaced pair( for that larger than life piano sound); those first two methods are cardioid - driven, when going with figure 8s or Omni, it’s usually as a third mic outside the piano, or in the adjacent room (great results are gotten a few inches from the floor in Omni or fig 8 mode).

When close mics are used, I keep the lid on, but mic 6 to 10 inches from the strings, that’s far enough away to avoid reflections off the lid (in cardioid mode).

I also hang a cloud over the piano from my well trapped 8 foot tall ceiling - you can never have too much bass trapping

Have also found a third mic, often just a small condenser, works well in one of the sound holes, as a fill mic.

I’d stay away from blumlein in a case like this, and take advantage of the cardioid polar patterns - move the mics around, once you find the right spot it’ll be good for a long time.
Old 13th September 2020
  #11
Lives for gear
The piano is one of the most difficult instruments to record.

That said, your biggest problem is that untreated low ceiling. Any notes below A220 (Next octave below A440) are going comb filter out frequencies and create the weird 'hot' notes you are talking about. With that short ceiling, even though the piano is in tune, the recorded sound will sound out of tune. Ribbon mics will help remove this out of tune effect to some degree.

The lid was NEVER designed for recording. It was designed to throw sound out toward the audience. Removing the lid is a good idea since it removes a large reflecting area for recording. However, In your circumstance, it may actually be a good thing to put the lid back on to angle the sound to prevent the comb filtering effect. You will have to experiment there.

The cheapest solution is the throw up a large thick blanket letting it tent your piano. You will have to add some reverb.

Add more treatment to the ceiling. The problem is your ceiling, your gear is just fine. Better gear will not make the sound better - better room treatment or moving to a bigger space will.

You could save all the agrivation and hire out some of the last remaining studios with a high end piano, room and gear.

Last edited by piano; 13th September 2020 at 05:32 AM..
Old 13th September 2020
  #12
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Bruce Watson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by piano View Post
Add more treatment to the ceiling. The problem is your ceiling, your gear is just fine. Better gear will not make the sound better - better room treatment or moving to a bigger space will.
Yep. This.
Old 13th September 2020
  #13
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Bruce Watson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by maximumteatime View Post
Could you explain why the pattern of the ribbon isn't effective in this context? My idea was using proximity effect to get a warmer, fuller sound by being close up. I should mention I'm using it in Blumlein rather than M/S currently. Omni in close up would be better?
You're getting lost in the detail. The primary consideration is the room. Fix the room's problems (especially that low ceiling) and mic choice and placement becomes easier to deal with. IOW you can't mic your way out of room problems.

Look at the figure 8 pattern. As you bring this in close, the angle you're trying to cover gets bigger. This puts some of the piano strings on either side into the periphery of the pattern. IOW, the strings in the center of the pattern (where the mic is pointing) will sound fine, the strings outside of the pattern will be attenuated. The piano will sound non-linear in the recording. Try it and see. In your specific case you may find you don't care, or you actually like it. Whatever works for you.

What proximity effect gets you is a non-linear response. It artificially boosts some of the bottom range. I say some, because using a directional mic implies rolling off the very bottom of the range. If you want the very bottom end of a piano (A0, 27.5 Hz) to be linear use omnis.

Last edited by Bruce Watson; 13th September 2020 at 04:34 PM..
Old 13th September 2020
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
(...) What proximity effect gets you is a non-linear response. It artificially boosts some of the bottom range. I say some, because using a directional mic implies rolling off the very bottom of the range. If you want the very bottom end of a piano (A0, 27.5 Hz) to be linear use omnis.
this - except that i mostly put 'function' (pattern) over sound (frequency response), especially under less than ideal situations (as in the op's case).

i therefore almost always end up using directional mics (to various degrees) for the main stereo pickup of a grand piano but add a single mic with a steep hpf - same for recording of organs btw although i'm then mostly using a blm for the .1 pickup.


___


what i forgot to mention in my previous posts: for a 'modern' jazz piano sound, i'm mostly mixing things from the pianist's perspective (in terms of balance/panorama)!

and i got no problem to process the signal from the .1 mic in vastly different ways to get a real tight bottom end which imo easily compensates for a lack of lf pickup of directional mics (which can't fully get emulated by proximity effect and/or filter settings).
Old 2 weeks ago
  #15
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Crazy4Jazz's Avatar
 

Quote:
but the reason for using directional mics is pretty simple: i'm mostly interested in what's happening in front of mics and less around them, but certainly not behind them so i hardly ever use omnis in any application.
Been using a pair of Neumann KM183s on grand piano for a while. Sounds fine and is hardly my most problematic instrument in my room. Piano is a Steinway. Use a preamp with a HPF and it all works nicely. What doesn't work is the ribbon mic. AEA R84 figure 8 pattern sounds okay on the source except that the source is in front of and behind the mic. Not great in a small room, it's not bleed it's directly recording sources I don't want. Got to get rid of it.

For this OP I would suggest not using the ribbons in a small space. You may like the sound but if you can't control what you are recording what's the point. Other mics will do a better job with less trouble.

Quote:
If you want the very bottom end of a piano (A0, 27.5 Hz) to be linear use omnis.
Seems to be true with omnis I've been using.

Quote:
Better gear will not make the sound better - better room treatment or moving to a bigger space will.
I have known for a long time that the best way to improve the recording of an acoustic ensemble is to move to a bigger room and then work on the room. But that is not an option. In that case I would take the advice of others here, treat the room as best you can and use gear that will work best under the circumstances. IMO ribbon mics won't be the best choice. Maybe the work in front of loud amplifiers or for overdubs and such, but with ensembles in a small room, not so much.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #16
Lives for gear
In this context, I wouldn't have expected that there would be much difference in pickup between a ribbon (fig 8) and a KM183 (Omni) ?

You would be getting 360 degree-like pickup with both mics...except that the ribbon would give very desirable mulling in the 90 degree plane, which the Omni lacks.

Given that the OP says he's removed the piano lid, and that he estimates the room's ceiling is contributing an undesirable reflection, a ribbon with its null facing the ceiling would seem to be a significant advantage over an Omni in this situation... but otherwise their susceptibilities to room boundary anomalies would be similar, since they both have rear and/or 360 pickup ?

Simple proximity to the instrument is likely to swing the balance in favour of the ratio of desired vs undesirable pickup in the OP's case....rather than the directional character of the mics. However, a uni-directional mic (with good rejection of off-axis sounds) would likely be the best tool in the case of a small untreated room, and certainly better than either fig 8 or Omni, even if the directional mic lacks the bass extension of the pressure Omni ?
Old 1 week ago
  #17
Here for the gear
 

GS

Hey all,

Thanks for all your suggestions. Unsurprisingly, it sounds like there are many ways to approach this and many different schools of thought on how to make it sound good (particularly fascinated that lid on/off is such a polarizing issue !). In any case, I’ve been experimenting a whole lot and have findings to report + some audio to hopefully make this a more fruitful conversation.

Firstly, and most importantly, after much trial and error, my vision for the sound I’m after is much clearer now, so I’d like to re-articulate this: I’m looking for more warmth, more low end, more body, more richness. I think the reason I’m liking the R88 close up, is because it’s giving me the fullness that the DPAs are not. Now I think about it, my question about omni capsules is more about wanting to get that fullness from the DPAS so I can put the R88 somewhere else - but it seems I’ll still have an issue with the ceiling if I use anything non-directional over the hammers?
(I should note - I’m working on a solution for ceiling treatment, but in the meantime I’ve put the lid back on.)

The various setups I’ve tried so far have mostly given me quite a bright, punchy sound - great for many things, but I’d love to expand the palette of options and be able to get a rounder sound, particularly for solo piano work. It’s largely just the sound of this piano - it’s a 2003 Steinway, so fairly bright sounding from the get go. I had the piano serviced and voiced last week - the hammers have needed profiling for a while, and this was contributing to the mid-heavy sound. I had hoped this would resolve the problem resonances I’ve talked about but no luck - they appear to just be overly resonant notes in this particular piano. Contrary to many suggestions, I really don’t think this is a room issue - if I stick my head in above the hammers and listen just to the piano, those few notes stick out all the same. So I think it’s a question of selecting the right mic and mic position to not make that issue any more prominent, and then creative EQ/dynamics afterwards to tame those problem frequencies.

Ultimately I’m currently questioning whether the sound I’m after is actually a spaced pair of cardioid LDCs above the hammers? Instead of messing with omni vs cardioid capsules on these DPAs… Could that be the “secret” behind this full bodied close up thing I’m talking about? Or perhaps a single LDC in combination with the coincident DPAS?

To illustrate - here’s a few audio clips. I know I initially mentioned an ECM style sound, but here’s something a little different - the intro has all the qualities of that full bodied close sound that I’m after: https://youtu.be/tZR20RJcY4w

And here’s some unprocessed clips of me playing that same intro, with a couple of mic positions:

DPAs

Position A - ORTF above hammers
Position B - ORTF, centered beneath the lid

R88

Position A - R88 in the crook of the piano

Position B - R88 above hammers

I've bounced out these mics separately to illustrate more clearly what I'm hearing from each position. Combining them is obviously an option, but for the purposes of this discussion, I thought better to present the mic options isolated. There are gobos in the room, but I’ve moved them out of the way for this also - so any discussion about my room sound can also be well informed.

Appreciate any thoughts or observations!
Attached Thumbnails
Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound-position-.jpg   Mic'ing advice for grand piano modern jazz sound-position-b.jpg  
Attached Files

DPA - Position A.mp3 (1.07 MB, 219 views)

DPA - Position B.mp3 (1.06 MB, 222 views)

R88 - Position A.mp3 (1.07 MB, 214 views)

R88 - Position B.mp3 (1.06 MB, 214 views)

Old 1 week ago
  #18
Gear Nut
Just FYI, if you listen closely that is not just a piano intro. The bass player is doubling the fundamental, and either his timing or the editor's mouse skills are good enough that the attack is indistinguishable from the piano left hand. It sure makes it sound extra full, and I like it! But piano acoustic it is not.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Lives for gear
Have you tried the R88 at the tail of the piano, pointing up the length of it? That’s where I usually put mine, but my style is not the same as yours!
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