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MixPre 10M or MixPre 10 II?
Old 3 weeks ago
  #1
MixPre 10M or MixPre 10 II?

Hello, is there a reason why the Sound Device mixpre 10m would not be appropriate for making multi-track recording of concerts? I don’t need the Time code or the 32 bit floating and the Mixpre 10 II would be much more expensive for features I don’t really have the use for. I have to make a choice very quickly. Thank you.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 
elpillo's Avatar
 

You should be able to use MixPre 10M with no issues (except maybe firmware related but that's not exclusive of MixPre 10M)
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
Gear Addict
 

Not hugely different for your purposes.

Some possibly relevant differences include max of 96kHz instead of 192kHz (probably not an issue) and no mid-side pair linking (may not be an issue). Adjustable limiters on the 10ii, but you may not be using limiters anyway.

One of the main practical (and rarely mentioned) disadvantages of the M models over their non-M models is the more limited screen views, but with the 10M vs 10t/10ii this is much less relevant as your individual track meters will be short vertical ones anyway.

And the 10M offers monophonic wavs for each track, which you may prefer to a polywav file.

Gen 1 10T prices have been very low since the Mixpre-10 ii came out, so I imagine the 10M will be much cheaper still: should be a bargain!

Cheers,

Roland
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
The Mixpre stay quite expensive in Europe, but a new 10M is 1300€ taxes included and the 10 II 1800€.
I would love that the 10M would fit my usage but I was told that the W Music project mode could be a problem vs the Audio project mode, but I don’t know why.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Addict
 

Whether or not the M version will work for you is hard to say, as you simply refer to 'multi-track recording of concerts'. There are some workflow issues with the M versions such as difficulty in reviewing much earlier takes of a track, but it is hard to know whether that is relevant. I only use the Musician plug-in (which turns my normal Mixpre into an M version) when overdubbing, not for anything else.

Moreover, 1300€ for a Mixpre-10M doesn't seem like the greatest bargain. There were some much better deals last year on Gen 1 Mixpres, but even now, for example, Pinknoise is selling the original Mixpre-10T at £1225 inc VAT, which seems a better deal. And Soundkit is selling the Mixpre-10ii at £1424 inc VAT. Both are extremely reputable UK audio specialists, and, with current exchange rates, are much better than what you are looking at. There may well be better deals than these.

Cheers,

Roland
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
Lives for gear
 

For the last few years I have been using the regular audio mode to record music on my MixPre (I have the original MixPre6) but decided a few months back to switch to the Musician's plugin instead.

I agree that the limited screen views is a drawback, although you can partially compensate for that by using the free Wingman app on a tablet, which at least expands the view and makes it easier to see your levels. When I'm sitting at a table recording music I generally have Wingman running on a tablet and a control surface attached to the MixPre for quicker and easier setting of gain, muting and arming tracks, and mixing.

The main advantages to me of the Musician's mode over regular audio mode are 1) no polywav files to split, and 2) the ability to overdub. I doubt I will ever use the reverb and certainly not the vocal "air" effect, nor do I ever see myself rendering files directly from the MixPre. But as a very-low-latency recording device that allows me to multitrack and overdub with a DAW-like workflow, it's very useful. And unlike recording directly to a laptop, you don't have to worry about fan noise from the computer.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
Thank you all for your help,

I finally decided to leave the 10M to take a 10t that I just found. I will try perhaps one day the musician plugin but I will feel more comfortable to not being limited by the M that is not evolutive.

My last question is to wonder if I should take the 10 II over the 10t.
Are there any big advantages if I do only acoustic music recordings?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adagietto View Post
My last question is to wonder if I should take the 10 II over the 10t.
Are there any big advantages if I do only acoustic music recordings?
According to the Sound Devices website:

What is different about the MixPre II compared to the previous MixPre models?

All MixPre II Series recorders feature 32-bit float recording, timecode generators, 192 kHz recording, adjustable limiters, auto-copy to USB drives, and extended Pre-roll. The MixPre-10 II TA3 balanced outputs are now +18 dBu.

Some of those features were already available in the 10t; the main differentiator for the 10-series is the addition of 32-bit floating point recording. For music, as long as you're familiar with the music beforehand and thus have a sense of its dynamic range, the 32-bit float feature isn't necessary. It could save you in situations where dynamic range is unpredictable, but people successfully captured a huge variety of field recordings long before 32-bit floating point recorders became available.

The other thing to consider with version II is that the new hardware opens it up to new features that can be added via plugins and firmware updates in the future, so you might miss out on those if you go with version I. But given the completeness of the feature set already available in these recorders, those will likely be "nice to have" rather than "must have" new features.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
Gear Addict
 

I got a great deal on a b stock 10M so I bought it and I really love the unit. I wish I had spent the extra $500 for the 10ii though because now I’m realizing timecode would be occasionally useful. The M plug-in is more useful to me than timecode which is why I bought the 10M instead of a 10T but I really should have just gotten the ii which has the ability to do it all.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Addict
 

I also wish Wingman had more functionality. If it could control the unit completely- I/O setup, fader, pan, gain, etc... that would be terrific. Oh well.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 
JamesClark1991's Avatar
The mixpre-10 ii would be a much better investment, it's more versatile and will have MUCH better re-sale value in the future. That last part I cannot over state.

Old 1 week ago
  #12
Gear Maniac
 
elpillo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesClark1991 View Post
...and will have MUCH better re-sale value in the future.
Well... That's until SD comes up with the 10Tiii or something else... I mean, "resale value" it's important, but with this recorders you can't expect much.

I was one of the many users that got the first generation of 10T and you saw what happened: 10Tii came right after "better and cheaper". I'm glad "resale value" wasn't thaaaaat important to me when I got this particular piece of gear. It would've been extremely disappointing.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Well,

finally I changed my mind again and took a MixPre 10 II. Very happy with it.
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