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Not good news for the Cleveland Orchestra
Old 3 weeks ago
  #1
Not good news for the Cleveland Orchestra

I just learned that the Cleveland Orchestra cancelled their summer season at the Blossom Pavilion near Akron, Ohio and their fall concert season is in jeopardy.

See https://www.clevelandorchestra.com/t...e-coronavirus/

Not good for the orchestra musicians nor their patrons.

I recorded the Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom for a number of seasons.

My prayers go out for all who have to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
It's a pretty universal lament right now...here's a UK perspective:

https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...ht-coronavirus
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 View Post
It's a pretty universal lament right now...here's a UK perspective:

https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...ht-coronavirus
Interesting article. Thanks for sharing.

I kinda figured the CO was not the only orchestra having to deal with this pandemic.

Simon Rattle makes some interesting observations in the article.

I honestly wonder how long this pandemic will be "messing" up things in the world and especially the world of music???

Again thanks for the heads up.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
Deleted d195ea3
Guest
I for one am glad to see at least some people are taking this all seriously enough. its way WAY too soon to be having public events. or opening restaurants, bars, beaches, theme parks etc. there are new cases everyday. more people dying everyday. yeah, I am all for shutting it down.

and I dont see this situation as messing up anything for the vast majority of "musicians" today.. they weren't earning any money prior to and wont be earning any money post.. frankly, I dont think they care one bit.. if anything theyre happy to be locked in at home with more time on their hands to hobby hobby away. but I digress. that is a whole other topic
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Maniac
 
denstrow's Avatar
Some orchestras here are turning to works that require fewer musicians or chamber music for the time being. Sucks for freelancers like me as well, since now they won't need additional musicians for a while.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I honestly wonder how long this pandemic will be "messing" up things in the world and especially the world of music???
Short answer is nobody knows....except perhaps that it's very likely to be much longer than we'd hope for. Many countries are still experiencing the 'first wave', with new case numbers and deaths either rising or slowly plateauing.

Those nations that either experienced it earlier and/or have got it relatively under control (Taiwan, New Zealand, Australia) or are experiencing a 'second wave surge' (China) are the ones to watch...especially how quickly and effectively they might be able to rein in and quell any subsequent (inevitable ?) outbreaks. It seems likely we'll have to live with this virus as a constant background threat for a very long time...unless a vaccine appears.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
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JCBigler's Avatar
There's going to be a lot of arts groups that fold because of this. Most were on the brink of bankruptcy anyway and just barely staying alive. My guess is that half of the rest of the regional operas and a solid quarter of the orchestras in this country will go out of business by the end of the spring 2021 season.

For profit arts and entertainment companies won't fare much better.

And the freelance technicians and production companies that support all of the above are going to have a hell of a hard time making it through this thing. Many of them will go out of business and have to change careers because of this.

My tour is closed until March 2021 at the earliest. The arts companies that I would normally work with locally are still in limbo.

I'm honestly looking at what to do to make ends meet until this thing starts back up. I'm thinking about real estate video and photography. Maybe truck driving. If I can figure out how to sell remote production/teleconference services to local schools and companies that might be viable. But all of those take a whole new skill set and equipment that I would have to gear up with.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #8
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the situation (both in terms of the pandemic and the orchestras) is vastly different, depending very much on where you are based:

the pandemic in my country is largely under control - and the orchestras get funded by the government/state up to ca. 80%; the largest orchestra in town just picked up work again, with smaller orchestras to follow soon.

it's uncertain though whether a drug can be developed... - what would help right now (not only the orchestras but imo also our society) would be that we become aware of our mortality and to let those who accept higher risks - just as with smoking, drinking, driving etc. - make music and to let the audience attend the concerts again...

(max. capacity here is currently limited to 300 people, possibly getting raised to 1000 within the next two months)
Old 3 weeks ago
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
t's uncertain though whether a drug can be developed... - what would help right now (not only the orchestras but imo also our society) would be that we become aware of our mortality and to let those who accept higher risks - just as with smoking, drinking, driving etc. - make music and to let the audience attend the concerts again...

(max. capacity here is currently limited to 300 people, possibly getting raised to 1000 within the next two months)
Or...you could just turn back the clock a few months and have gone with good governance instead ?

Perhaps a referendum vote of all Swiss citizens, to see whether those most at risk of infection, complications and death are happy with the cavalier actions of the selfish few...who risk bringing about a '2nd wave' which would risk the lives of the most vulnerable. Acceptance of heightened risk is not just a personal decision...you inflict the consequences of it upon everyone in society, but maybe you have Kevlar-coated lungs...and are invincible ?

Meanwhile, half a world away, here's a news report from New Zealand today:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-...turns/12353918

"....There were no restrictions on their contact; they could hug, high-five, crowd in for selfies. There was no need for masks or social distancing. They could cheer as often and loudly as they wished and they did so enough to make the rafters ring at the indoor stadium"

It gives an indication of what's deemed possible, once the conditions are right.....

For the choristers (and interested parties gathered here) this gives a detailed breakdown of the cautions currently advised:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2...virus/12344812

Last edited by studer58; 3 weeks ago at 12:40 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 View Post
Or...you could just turn back the clock a few months and have gone with good governance instead ?

Here's a news report from New Zealand today: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-...turns/12353918

"....There were no restrictions on their contact; they could hug, high-five, crowd in for selfies. There was no need for masks or social distancing. They could cheer as often and loudly as they wished and they did so enough to make the rafters ring at the indoor stadium"
that's not what i'm suggesting...

what i'm saying is that i question the primacy of disease policy.

yes, we did save some lives! but too much damage has been done, we failed at protecting the most vulnerable people and we put an incredible burden on the young generation... - and we're going to kill thousands if not millions in the less priviledged places in the world.

we just aren't smart enough! THIS gotta change - we'll need to accept higher personal risks...

besides, no government in the western world will survive the political outfall of a second lockdown (if there was any - which wasn't the case in my country) and you can't put the whole world on 'go fund me' either!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
that's not what i'm suggesting...

what i'm saying is that i question the primacy of disease policy.

yes, we did save some lives! but too much damage has been done, we failed at protecting the most vulnerable people and we put an incredible burden on the young generation... - we just weren't smart enough! THIS gotta change with a second wave and the only way i can think of is accepting higher personal risks.

besides, no government in the western world will survive the political outfall of a second lockdown (if there was any - which wasn't the case in my country)
Time alone will tell...there is a vast amount of latitude between current best case (NZ) and worst case (Brazil, India) situations...and individual nations, plus clusters of same in similar situations, will have to manage the difficult balancing act of public safety and economic damage. There are many of these for whom lockdown itself is fraught with dire health/welfare consequences....for millions of their citizens....there is no 'one size fits all' solution
Old 3 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 

deedeeyeah, the questions surrounding public funding for performance of significant music compositions has been a consistent area of disagreement in this forum for many years. Historically the Church, Royal Families and more currently here in the USA the largess of wealthy industrialists have provided sustaining support for these activities. It is very difficult to justify public support of these activities in market driven societies with out a strong majority of public demand. Our original captains of heavy industry have faded away and todays silicone valley technology billionair crowd apparently prefer the "Eagles" and "Three Dog Night" over yesterdays classical music. Temple Square in Salt lake City, Utah is the most likely location to find a 300 voice choir and 100+ seat orchestra featuring world class soloists performing the classical music treasures. The best example of financially successful market driven faith based music performance is the Bill Gather "Home Coming Series": Magnificent choral, quartet, trio and solo performance that is in the Southern Gospel genre---not classical music.
It is abundantly clear that only a miniscule number of US citizens would walk across the street for a classical music performance let alone pay for it: and that is where we are on this side of the big water.
Hugh
Old 3 weeks ago
  #13
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Phil Cibley's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I just learned that the Cleveland Orchestra cancelled their summer season at the Blossom Pavilion near Akron, Ohio and their fall concert season is in jeopardy.

See https://www.clevelandorchestra.com/t...e-coronavirus/

Not good for the orchestra musicians nor their patrons.

I recorded the Cleveland Orchestra at Blossom for a number of seasons.

My prayers go out for all who have to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.
I just got a notice from the NY Philharmonic that they are cancelling everything
until the end of January 2021.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #14
Lives for gear
 

thx hugh for reminding me (and maybe a few others) on the terrible effects of a money driven/market oriented society on cultural activities, especially when it comes to classical music (and some other areas we don't wanna discuss here): i really don't envy you!

imo the concept of letting private sponsors becoming this influential is flawed anyway: i've seen just a bit too many otherwise highly praised musicians playing at birthday parties of oligarchs who were put on the un sanctions list...

greez from the (very much priviledged) old world,

dd


p.s. my next gig in public will be next weekend: i'll be mixing/recording/broadcasting small chamber music ensembles, playing to an audience of 300 people.

p.p.s. the oligarchs of the olden days such as rockefeller donateted huge amounts of money for re-building cathedrals in europe after ww2 - i doubt musk or bezos would do something similar, at least they don't seem to be engaged in afghanistan or iraq...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
deedeeyeah, the questions surrounding public funding for performance of significant music compositions has been a consistent area of disagreement in this forum for many years. Historically the Church, Royal Families and more currently here in the USA the largess of wealthy industrialists have provided sustaining support for these activities. It is very difficult to justify public support of these activities in market driven societies with out a strong majority of public demand. Our original captains of heavy industry have faded away and todays silicone valley technology billionair crowd apparently prefer the "Eagles" and "Three Dog Night" over yesterdays classical music. Temple Square in Salt lake City, Utah is the most likely location to find a 300 voice choir and 100+ seat orchestra featuring world class soloists performing the classical music treasures. The best example of financially successful market driven faith based music performance is the Bill Gather "Home Coming Series": Magnificent choral, quartet, trio and solo performance that is in the Southern Gospel genre---not classical music.
It is abundantly clear that only a miniscule number of US citizens would walk across the street for a classical music performance let alone pay for it: and that is where we are on this side of the big water.
Hugh

So sad. The local conservatory of music graduates about 125 musicians a year, Most of them seek positions in major orchestras or solo careers. If 10% of them find work it would probably be cause for celebration. Many conservatory students are double degree students by necessity so they can find paying jobs once they leave college.

The funding in the US for major orchestras is getting worse every year. Growing up in Cleveland I remember in the 50's, 60's and 70's that a lot of the orchestra's income was from "patrons" who recently have had to cut their funding to the orchestra due to funding other charities which provide food and housing for low income families. The Cleveland Orchestra is a very expensive entity and has become even more so with higher and higher salaries for the players (you have to pay to get the best talent) as well as for the ever increasing cost of maintaining the facility and the union cost for stage hands. I am surprised they have managed to maintain the orchestra as long as they have at the level they are at now. I only hope something will change and they will be able to survive into the next decade. People will pay upwards of $50+ dollars per ticket to go see a Cleveland Indian's game or the Cleveland Browns but when asked how much they would be willing to pay for see the Cleveland Orchestra they would probably say $0 dollars or " what do they play". I am afraid in the good old US of A classical music does not rank very high on people's want list.

FWIW and MTCW
Old 3 weeks ago
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 View Post
...there is no 'one size fits all' solution
definitely not - and yet almost all governments reverted to mimetic isomorphism...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #17
Lives for gear
Faced with the choice between attending a public event.... because my local orchestra/chamber group/sporting club/choir has responded to the soothing yet unfounded optimism of city officials or governors crying ''we've got to reopen the city, get businesses and entertainment working again''....or trusting the national and municipal health authorities, Johns Hopkins Uni and other sources of disease control....I'd rather err on the side of caution, stay home and turn on the big screen for some rich offering such as : https://www.medici.tv/en/

...even if it means the sound tech, musicians and their organization won't benefit from my ticket $ just yet...until the time for return to 'normalcy' truly arrives.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #18
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just let people decide again what risk they are willing to take: chances of contracting the bug over here are about as high (or low) as getting hit by a car (or satellite), meaning we got ca. 3 dozens of confirmed cases per day on average over the last few weeks with a population of ca. 8.5millions - go figure...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
just let people decide again what risk they are willing to take: chances of contracting the bug over here are about as high (or low) as getting hit by a car (or satellite), meaning we got ca. 3 dozens of confirmed cases per day on average over the last few weeks with a population of ca. 8.5millions - go figure...
I foresee a promising career ahead for you, as a risk-assessor in the insurance business...just make sure your guesses are underwritten by a major Swiss bank or two...
Old 3 weeks ago
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 View Post
I foresee a promising career ahead for you, as a risk-assessor in the insurance business...just make sure your guesses are underwritten by a major Swiss bank or two...
lol - thx but no thx: besides tweaking audio, i do a bit of consulting but that's for the government and international institutions - not sure things would turn out well if they'd be handed over to insurance companies as they always seem to come to vastly different risk asessements than anyone else...

besides, they have long turned in to banks! now the swiss banks do not have an especially well reputation...

living in basel, i prefer to stick to the spiritual heritage of albert hofmann! :-)


___


less personal but more on topic: if i wouldn't be thinking that we'll make it out of this situation well, i wouldn't be evaluating a new digital desk which i plan on using for broadcasting mainly of orchestras playing in a newly renovated concert hall here in town...

(it has the same name as your alias - happy to show you both the desk and the concert hall should you or anyone else ever make it over here)

stay well everyone!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #21
Lives for gear
In the US, we can already see the majority of colleges (except California) lining up to reopen this fall and have college sports. It's all about the $ when it comes down to what is an "acceptable risk." Community choir---too risky. Baseball, soccer, football, basketball---just wait and see.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #22
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hbphotoav's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
In the US, we can already see the majority of colleges (except California) lining up to reopen this fall and have college sports. It's all about the $ when it comes down to what is an "acceptable risk." Community choir---too risky. Baseball, soccer, football, basketball---just wait and see.
"Acceptable Risk" should, in a "free-ish" society, be determined by those individuals willing to take the risk, not by ideological government 'officials'. It's hard to understand without being versed in U.S. Constitutional theory, law and practice. Some of us are appalled at the ongoing loss of liberty to increasingly unilateral government control measures, many of them enacted without constitutional due process.

Not saying it's "better" or "worse" than other governmental constructs... just saying it's ours... at least for the time being.

HB
Old 3 weeks ago
  #23
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Harry Butler, your post #23 exactly expresses my sentiments also. The cornerstone of our Constitution is the ability to maintain individual assessments of personal risks. We Americans are not supposed to be a flock of sheep that has developed a taste for short grass: we have done pretty well over the past 225 years charting a unique blue print of governance that is never perfect but much better than any other known to man. Our current political polarization is not party based: it is all about 70 years of Wall street, K-street and the military dominance of our federal government. We will be determining within the next six months whether or not reformation of this federal cabal is possible!

There are occasions when adherence to Constitutional principals are "uncomfortable" however as much as I enjoy a performance of a great symphony orchestra I am in a small U.S. minority in that regard: the maintenance of classical art is appropriately not considered worthy of public tax based support.
The thing that makes my but itch is the fact that we are "25 TRILLION" in debt fighting 20 years of Middle east wars and 70 years of maintaining 200,000 men in "standing forces" in Europe and the Pacific rim against the wishes of a huge majority of US citizens. Growing up during the Korean war, six years in the army in the 60s along with all of the military intervention we have initiated over the past 50 years I have seen way too many broken bodies and Flagg draped caskets to ever justify big government and the Pentagon's thirst for nation building. Given todays technology there will be no more world wars of attrition: the price of nuclear devastation is too much for even the most ambitious politicians.
Hugh
Old 3 weeks ago
  #24
My mantra continues to be "safety first". I am in the "high risk" category so I will be staying close to home for the foreseeable future. I have already had calls from video clients wanting me to do some "on location" work for them but I have turned them down due to too many risks from COVID-19 in places I would have to work.

In our state, Ohio, our governor seems to be listening to health officials and doing his best to keep us all safe. If that means shutting down the state again I will back his decision because I know he has everyone's best interest at heart. I too worry about people's jobs and loss of income but better safe than dead . FWIW
Old 3 weeks ago
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
(...) Given todays technology there will be no more world wars of attrition: the price of nuclear devastation is too much for even the most ambitious politicians.
i wish the latter would be true...

(believe me, i'm an expert on these topics and part of a team which regularly gets to inspect these horrific weapons)

...there's an entirely different school of thinking about the use of nuclear weapons in low-threshold areas!

not exactly picking up on this but here's a very recent article on the current amount of nuclear weapons (use deepl or similar to translate):

https://m.faz.net/aktuell/politik/au...-16815749.html

or go to sipri.org or osce.org to get a more detailed picture.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
Harry Butler, your post #23 exactly expresses my sentiments also. The cornerstone of our Constitution is the ability to maintain individual assessments of personal risks. We Americans are not supposed to be a flock of sheep that has developed a taste for short grass: we have done pretty well over the past 225 years charting a unique blue print of governance that is never perfect but much better than any other known to man. Our current political polarization is not party based: it is all about 70 years of Wall street, K-street and the military dominance of our federal government. We will be determining within the next six months whether or not reformation of this federal cabal is possible!

There are occasions when adherence to Constitutional principals are "uncomfortable" however as much as I enjoy a performance of a great symphony orchestra I am in a small U.S. minority in that regard: the maintenance of classical art is appropriately not considered worthy of public tax based support.
The thing that makes my but itch is the fact that we are "25 TRILLION" in debt fighting 20 years of Middle east wars and 70 years of maintaining 200,000 men in "standing forces" in Europe and the Pacific rim against the wishes of a huge majority of US citizens. Growing up during the Korean war, six years in the army in the 60s along with all of the military intervention we have initiated over the past 50 years I have seen way too many broken bodies and Flagg draped caskets to ever justify big government and the Pentagon's thirst for nation building. Given todays technology there will be no more world wars of attrition: the price of nuclear devastation is too much for even the most ambitious politicians.
Hugh
You sound like those "out of touch and out of era" outlaws in Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch" ...trying to fight a futile frontier war in a mythical Wild West that no longer exists...in an era where the "right to bear arms" also has no current relevance. The Wild West, as romanticized, was where the individual had little need of governance or federal protection...and thus individual rights could be exercised, and held as a lofty ideal. The luxury of no mutual obligation to 'a society' could also be trumpeted, as there was a constant movement outward...pushing ahead the frontier as a proud, independent individual.

In a pandemic, if a society, a nation is to survive, the individual rights must needs be subservient to the greater good of containment, social distancing, closing down normal cross-infection transit & propagation routes...until control is attained.

Where the country, from the President on down, invites puzzled head-shaking and incredulity, from outside observers, is the inability to defer a misplaced and outdated belief in frontiersman individual rights and freedoms for the greater good of a functional and healthy urbanized society...a 21st C nation. "Every man is free"..but no more than that...and with freedom comes obligation also, to one's fellow man.

If you'd like to argue, as Margaret Thatcher said, that there is "no such thing as society", then there are certainly ways of acting which are socially responsible, which are aimed at containment and prevention of viral spread:

https://theconversation.com/why-ther...vulsion-136008

The inability to discern which era one is living and functioning in is very likely a fatal flaw...myth-making, rhetoric and looking back to the Wild West won't get one far in the Great Covidity, it's just futile fossil thinking. The current implosion of American society is simply this basic inability writ large. Thankfully the 20-somethings whose vote will carry the country ahead seem to have grasped this reality....

Last edited by studer58; 3 weeks ago at 04:53 PM..
Old 3 weeks ago
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
In the US, we can already see the majority of colleges (except California) lining up to reopen this fall and have college sports. It's all about the $ when it comes down to what is an "acceptable risk." Community choir---too risky. Baseball, soccer, football, basketball---just wait and see.
Here in California the entire University system will be shut down through fall and into next year. Those that paid $$$ to attend Stanford or Berkley will get no refunds or discounts to their attenuated semesters with "at home learning", in other words, you get to take a low cost on-line course from your parent's basement without the college experience.

Those in medicine or sciences will have to forgive any lab work, in other words, you will receive a cut rate education for a full fare price.

Those employers hiring after graduation may take that into their hiring decisions, do they really want to hire a recent UC grad or maybe someone that really went to college?

If I was attending the UC I would consider a transfer to a fully operating university in another state, it's your future.

Meanwhile, nail salons and bars are opening up here in San Diego on Friday.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #28
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Studer58; At 80 years of age I have no personal memory of the movie version of the "Wild West": however I have a very vivid memory of the 1945 thru 1950 TB epidemic followed by a Polio virus that killed or permanently crippled more than 100,000 Americans in 1952 and then in 1957 a flu virus that killed 67,000 people here in a country that never through it all ever shut down. And we sure as hell did not hole up in nursing homes the most vulnerable population base as a repository for infected patients.
70 years of government growth since relatively sane folks were in charge of our federal affairs we now have an unrealistic cabal of DC bubble dwellers that actually believe big government can do it better than main street. Is the 20 year old crew you predict will make a voting difference in six months the same crowd that has joined up with arsonist looters running wild in most of the major cities run by Democrats? That scenario has more holes than swiss cheese.

Rational legislation to improve the implementation of Constitutional Law is now on the front burner with a huge majority of our country. The murder of George Floyd is a clarion call of needed change: however knee jerk emotional federal legislation prepared with out comprehensive thinking pursuant to the limiting factors the Constitution requires is an exercise in futility that will match any expectation of 20 year olds controlling the November election.
Hugh
Old 3 weeks ago
  #29
Gear Addict
 
kludgeaudio's Avatar
 

We have a number of local classical groups which are shut down for the duration. They don't have any money coming in at all. But they ALSO don't have any money going out.... no concerts, no rehearsals. No musicians being paid, no advertising being done. Some of them have offices that cost money but a lot of them are just operating out of basements and garages with minimal staff anyway.

So... there is some worry about the arts organizations... but there should be a lot more worry about the artists. People who depended on that concert series to pay their rent are in a bad state.
--scott
Old 3 weeks ago
  #30
Gear Nut
 

Performers want to perform and are looking for ways to accomplish that goal.
This past Friday I traveled to Cullman, Alabama were the country artist Alan Jackson held an outdoor concert. The idea was the concert goers would remain in the vehicles and view Alan's performance on several large screens along with speaker arrays to cover the parking area which was probably 20+ acres in size. I had been hired by CBS Sunday Morning for the intent of capturing a musical performance with a large audience in this era of the Covid-19 pandemic.
Initially most folks remained in the vehicles during the early part of the afternoon in anticipation of the concert.
The sad/funny part came when the governor of Alabama along with be mayor of Cullman spoke, saying how great it was to have the first large concert in the US since the announcement of the pandemic. Praised Alan Jackson for coming out and making his music available. Thanked everyone for staying apart.
Well that staying apart bit lasted for the first couple of songs, then the area in front of the stage which had been empty filled with fans standing shoulder to shoulder. No masks, not distancing. Staying in their vehicles didn't happen. All ages from young children to older senior adults.
The only people I saw wearing masks were the camera person, myself and the police supplying security. None of the audience or any of Alan's crew seemed worried about the closeness of one another.
We did some MOS (man on the street) interviews before the concert and found the general theme, was we had been sheltering for months and couldn't wait to get out and see the concert any concert. People from all over were there, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi and probably other locations.
I applaud Alan Jackson for stepping up and trying to resume live music.
I just think folks don't believe they may be placed in danger. I personally have someone I worked with in the past that has Covid-19 and probably isn't going to make it.
We all need the work, but we do need to be responsible and respectable of each other in this new pandemic world.
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