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Old 2 weeks ago
  #31
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
and i bet they didn't use the most simple mic to record caruso either...

..
News flash: they never used ANY mic to record Caruso. He died in 1921, all his recordings are acoustic, meaning he sang into a metal horn. Not that there wasn't a lot of (now totally obsolete) skilled effort involved in that kind of recording, too...
Old 2 weeks ago
  #32
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by WiFiJeff View Post
News flash: they never used ANY mic to record Caruso. He died in 1921, all his recordings are acoustic, meaning he sang into a metal horn. Not that there wasn't a lot of (now totally obsolete) skilled effort involved in that kind of recording, too...
i thought the first 'microphones' were developed in the 1860-1880's? - nevermind, i guess it's fair to say that they used 'good gear', whatever that meant at the time...
Old 2 weeks ago
  #33
Gear Guru
 
Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
i thought the first 'microphones' were developed in the 1860-1880's?
Nothing "micro" about that stuff, though. No transduction, either, just literally funneling vibrations to (again literally) the head of a pin. Pretty amazing, actually.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #34
Quote:
Originally Posted by hughshouse View Post
I have been doing this type of layering for more than 15 years and it is far more efficient and quicker than the old "do it together as a band" analog days we were in 25 years ago.
I don't know what could be more efficient than a well rehearsed group walking in and laying it down in a take or 2 or 3. Having seen some live original line-up Kansas on YT - it sounds remarkably like the records. I would presume that they went into the studio being able to play it that way already, for the most part. But yeah, they were musician's musicians, whose lifestyle and star status didn't hold up the show.

But I know it can be done. I used to stack violins for a studio with a couple of friends back when we were in school. We walked in, played the music that was on the stand a few times - hence the stack - and packed up and left. The preparation was covered in the fact that we could read and play well.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #35
Old 2 weeks ago
  #36
Lives for gear
 

I am more than acutely aware of the time, effort, talent and commitment required to prepare an ensemble to be record ready. I spent 3 months overseeing the woodshed effort of the New South's "Old Home Place" project. (Rounder 044) 5 outstanding committed Bluegrass musicians (Tony Rice, Ricky Skaggs, Jerry Douglas, J.D.Crowe & Bobby Slone) recorded the project in 4 three hour sessions in Jan. 1975 and 8 years later we were awarded a grammy for the effort.
I was producing a project for Ricky Skaggs "Boone Creek Band" in 1976 and we lost a competition for a contract with CBS to Kansas. Most analog Live projects had a ton of overdubbing after the fact in those days and still do for that matter. None of this history from 45 years ago has much of anything to do with today.

Owen Bradley and Chet Adkins taught the world how to efficiently record pop records. It started at CBS with Owen at the piano working with a singer shaping a lyric. Chet had a very similar process at RCA with his guitar but in both cases when the singer was ready they would "call in the troops" (some of the finest session ready musicians and BU harmony singers that existed in the world) and lay down the tracks. Do overs were seldom if ever necessary. This was the blue print for todays layering. The magic was not 5 or 6 musicians contributing simultaneously: but it was the dependability of their performance that is essentially no different layering today than it was collectively performing in 1960.

Having been a producer for more than 50 years I know how much work it takes to successfully sell a lyric. The real creative process entails a hell of a lot more than twisting a few knobs and pushing faders.The two primary reasons I rarely ever work with a band today are as follows;
1) Dealing with egos and the musical realities when expectations are not met.
2) Time wasted rearranging poor musical execution.
I will always set up mics and punch record for a band benchmark recording if I have the time and I feel the band would benefit from the experience, but I usually send bands to studios that need the work.

Hugh

Last edited by hughshouse; 2 weeks ago at 11:53 PM..
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