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Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios
Old 3 weeks ago
  #1
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Remoteness's Avatar
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios

I figured we should have a 'show & tell style' drum kit mic'ing thread where we can share our techniques and ideas with the Remotester community at large.

The idea is to post images that are either 'on location' projects or from live performance concerts, videos and such

I plan to post various images from a wide variety of projects I've been involved in through my career. Each particular production venture will be in a single post, so if you so desire to ask a question or have an observation you could select the post you want to respond to. I welcome you to do the same.

Please feel free to share you projects and concepts.

I trust this will be an enjoyable and helpful experience for many of us!
Old 3 weeks ago
  #2
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Remoteness's Avatar
I'm going to start off with a project we did capturing Dennis Chambers in D.C. for PBS called, the Next-Generation Live UHDTV experience with HDR and DTS:X Immersive Audio. We truly had a blast working on this seriously cool project.

That said, I wish I had closeup shots of the drums more handy. But, I can answer any questions you may have.

The third image is the actual interior shot of the Tiny Big Mobile during this particular video shoot. The forth image is an exterior shot looking through the glass window of me behind the console during a take.

This was a partnership with PBS, DTS, DPA and Aura-Sonic, Ltd...
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-12-capturing-dennis-chambers-d.c..jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-12-dennis-chambers-house-.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-fb_img_1585436656600.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-fb_img_1585436677401.jpg  
Old 3 weeks ago
  #3
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Remoteness's Avatar
Here's a few images of the drum kit during this live performance capture we did at a singer/songwriter's home in the Hamptons. We setup the drums and bass in the back sun room. Had the bass amp at the top of the basement staircase. The vocals and guitars were setup in the kitchen just next to the Drum/Bass room. We set it up so everyone can see each other through the double glass doors.

The forth image is the actual rig we setup in the guest bedroom and used for this on location home recording.
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-09-view-kitchen-area-looking-into-drum-bass-world..jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-09-i-cannot-capture-drum-kit-without-my-trusty-drummers-right-knee-mic-technique.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-09-view-rear-corner-looking-towards-kitchen-area.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-0125182033a-01.jpg  
Old 3 weeks ago
  #4
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Remoteness's Avatar
We recorded Jon Batiste's residency at the Village Vanguard which yielded two live albums, 'Anatomy of Angels' and 'Chronology of a Dream' available on vinyl, CD and download.

The forth image is the actual rig we setup in the club's "kitchen" and used for this live recording.
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-10-any-questions.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-10-check-out-how-i-miced-joe-saylors-dual-drum-kit-setup.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-10-such-joy-listening-jon-batiste-friends-during-sound-check-rehearsal-earlier.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-fb_img_1585435783817.jpg  
Old 3 weeks ago
  #5
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Remoteness's Avatar
I recorded, engineered, produced, mixed and co-directed called, 'Focusing'*using both Elroy (as the studio) and The Bread Mobile (as the control room) for a six piece rock band called, Hey Guy. The interior shots were*captured using 13 GoPro cameras in one take with no additional overdubs.


Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-17-closeup-my-drummers-right-knee-mic-capturing-entire-kit.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-17-m88-bass-skin-e602-bass-hole-tlm103-md431-snare-md409-toms-m149-drummers-knee-.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-17-great-daniel-jakubovic-drums.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-17-took-picture-camera-d.jpg  
Old 3 weeks ago
  #6
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We captured 'Yebba' performing her song, "Evergreen" live with her band and a choir in the sanctuary of a church in NYC without any overdubs or major fixes for Apple Music. Here's a shot of the drum kit. We had to use our StackIt Gobos to control the sound in that extremely live sounding space.

The second picture is the actual interior shot of the Tiny Big Mobile during this particular video shoot. The third picture is an exterior shot of the Tiny Big Mobile out front of the church where we captured this video.

I tracked the origination, and the producer mixed to final mix for the video...

Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-11-my-micing-technique-hasnt-changed-decades..jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-fb_img_1519851119435.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-fb_img_1585437417819.jpg  
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
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Remoteness's Avatar
These few posts should get us going for the moment.

Let us see what you have to show and tell our Remotester community!
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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captainate's Avatar
 

Great idea!

I almost always forget to get pictures of setups in the heat of the moment, but here's something from a recent favorite. Shoot for Fender, featuring a band called "The Marias"

Soyuz Bomblet on Kick
Audix i5 on Snare
Oktava MK-012's on Toms
Beyerdynamic MC930's on OH
Apex 205 on Ride Spot
(please ignore the drummer's vocal mic, that was provided by the band)

Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-img_3410-2.jpg  

Last edited by captainate; 1 week ago at 04:19 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #9
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Remoteness's Avatar
Thanks for sharing your shoot with us. Nice job, BTW.

Did you capture and mix this interstitial marketing video?


Quote:
Originally Posted by captainate View Post
Great idea!

I almost always forget to get pictures of setups in the heat of the moment, but here's something from a recent favorite. Shoot for Fender, featuring a band called "The Marias"

Soyuz Bomblet on Kick
Audix i5 on Snare
Oktava MK-012's on Toms
Beyerdynamic MC930's on OH
Apex 205 on Ride Spot
(please ignore the drummer's vocal mic, that was a requirement from the band)

Old 1 week ago
  #10
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lukedamrosch's Avatar
 

Hi Steve,

Great idea, and thank you! I have the utmost respect for your drum mic'ing techniques and have learned a lot from all the great information you are always sharing.

If I could ask a quick question:

In these photos, where you are using some techniques that will be familiar to many of us -- the M160 overheads, the "drummer's right knee" technique, etc. -- how might you tailor this approach in terms of mic choice and placement if you were recording something significantly quieter than the average live date or singer-songwriter session?

I'm thinking of material like atmospheric jazz on ECM, etc.

Thanks again!
Luke


edit: Also, in that first picture you posted, is that black object on the highest stand a DPA 5100 surround mic?

Last edited by lukedamrosch; 1 week ago at 04:51 PM.. Reason: addition
Old 1 week ago
  #11
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captainate's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
Thanks for sharing your shoot with us. Nice job, BTW.

Did you capture and mix this interstitial marketing video?
Thanks, Steve! I did the capture (including production dialogue), and I believe it was mixed by Nashville-based engineer Alex Chaloff like most of this series.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Hi Luke,

Steve tuning in...

Was finishing up mixes for Devon Gilfillion and Jade Bird for a Bose AR project I'm involved in.

Thank you for your kind words. They are greatly appreciated.

Believe it or not, I have used the same drum mic'ing technique for all styles of music from soft to loud to extremely loud projects.

My mic placement was conceived way back when to capture the sound of the genre with great separation, focusing on the proper amount of isolation and when that is not possible (due to either stage or performance volume or size of the performance space) I position the mics and other transducers to maximize that "good" leakage. The genre is not as important as the placement of the instruments and transducers, depending on the sound and size of the space.

I usually go tighter with my mic placement on quieter performances. I tend to go much closer on the overhead and individual drum mic placements.

Microphone choices rarely change unless I'm trying a new thing, or the drummer may have some other concept he/she wants to hear.

For me, in many cases, the polar patterns I use are much more important than which mics I use. I mean, sometimes I'm a guest in a studio or on board another mobile unit, and I may only have what they have available to play with. If the right amount of preparation is done, I will already know what mics are available. At that time, I may decide to bring some (never leave home with them) mics from my field shop.

That is indeed a DPA 5100 surround mic. Only DPA mics were used on that on location capture. As mentioned above, it was a PBS/DTS/DPA collaboration for that 'Next-Generation Live UHDTV experience with HDR and DTS:X Immersive Audio' project we did for PBS.

Here's a link to a PBS press release that explains the Next-Generation Live UHDTV experience with HDR and DTS:X Immersive Audio we were involved with. We truly had a blast working on this seriously cool project.

Let me know if you have any additional questions or observations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lukedamrosch View Post
Hi Steve,

Great idea, and thank you! I have the utmost respect for your drum mic'ing techniques and have learned a lot from all the great information you are always sharing.

If I could ask a quick question:

In these photos, where you are using some techniques that will be familiar to many of us -- the M160 overheads, the "drummer's right knee" technique, etc. -- how might you tailor this approach in terms of mic choice and placement if you were recording something significantly quieter than the average live date or singer-songwriter session?

I'm thinking of material like atmospheric jazz on ECM, etc.

Thanks again!
Luke


edit: Also, in that first picture you posted, is that black object on the highest stand a DPA 5100 surround mic?
Old 1 week ago
  #13
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Sometimes you have to improvise on how to mic & capture (William Cobham's) Drums!

In this live performance capture, the drums were setup a lot different than what other drummers have done.

Instead of your typical high to low tom tom drum setup, Billy had a different concept in mind. Because of this unique setup, I decided to go with one mic per pair of drums and panned them a lot tighter than you would normally pan a traditional drum kit.

The third and forth images were a 'off the 25" color CRM video monitor on board The Bread Mobile' shot of Donald Harrison, William Cobham and Ron Carter during the 2005 live performance capture of the Half Note Records release, 'Donald Harrison - New York Cool: Live at the Blue Note.' Look how close everyone was on that club date recording.

I had to re-evaluation (on the spot) how to approach mic'ing William Cobham's drums. Needless to say, it was a great success!
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-03-sometime-you-have-improvise-how-mic-capture-william-cobhams-drums-.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-03-i-had-re-evaluation-how-approach-micing-william-cobhams-drums.-great-success.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-03-donald-harrison-william-cobham-ron-carter.jpg   Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-03-donald-harrison-ron-carter-billy-cobham.jpg  
Old 1 week ago
  #14
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Remoteness's Avatar
I love Alex Chaloff's work. Quite a talented individual on a few levels.

Quote:
Originally Posted by captainate View Post
Thanks, Steve! I did the capture (including production dialogue), and I believe it was mixed by Nashville-based engineer Alex Chaloff like most of this series.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
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DaveyJones's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
We captured 'Yebba' performing her song, "Evergreen" live with her band and a choir in the sanctuary of a church in NYC without any overdubs or major fixes for Apple Music. Here's a shot of the drum kit. We had to use our StackIt Gobos to control the sound in that extremely live sounding space.

I tracked the origination, and the producer mixed to final mix for the video...

Wow, what a production!!!

To think that was all put together 'live' is almost unbelievable to me. This type of performance is outside of my usual work but I'm amazed how clean the lead vocal is. Actually, I'm amazed how clean the whole thing is to be honest. It's a very clean and uncluttered mix. Did you mix? Do you know what was done post-production to this?


Thanks, Dave
Old 1 week ago
  #16
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Remoteness's Avatar
Thanks, Dave!

Like I mentioned above, I tracked the origination, and Yebba's producer, David Lai did the final mix for the video.

Not only was it all put together 'live,' it all happened in one day. Load in, setup of all departments (sound, lights, audio, video and band,) sound check, blocking, rehearsal and load out in one freakin' day. We truly needed two days. To tell you the truth, it was unbelievable to me too, there just wasn't enough time to get it right. We handled the audio capture and IEMs for everyone, and production kept delaying our ability to do our job. Needless to say, my crew and I got our job done anyway.

FYI, I modified my future location production contracts to stipulate specific needs and demands (that are normally understood with music production teams and not usually needed to be addressed) because of this particular live performance video shoot.

Everything you hear in this music video was captured live. No additional tracks were overdubbed outside of this production day.

Not much was done during post-production. Balancing, panned, and signal processing. That's about it.



Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJones View Post
Wow, what a production!!!

To think that was all put together 'live' is almost unbelievable to me. This type of performance is outside of my usual work but I'm amazed how clean the lead vocal is. Actually, I'm amazed how clean the whole thing is to be honest. It's a very clean and uncluttered mix. Did you mix? Do you know what was done post-production to this?


Thanks, Dave
Old 1 week ago
  #17
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Remoteness's Avatar
I went back to the original posts I published and added an image(s) for the recording rig that's relative to each of the productions.

I plan to add images of the recording rig that was used for each setup on all future posts I make for this drum mic'ing thread.

Cool, right?
Old 1 week ago
  #18
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lukedamrosch's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
I went back to the original posts I published and added an image(s) for the recording rig that's relative to each of the productions.

I plan to add images of the recording rig that was used for each setup on all future posts I make for this drum mic'ing thread.

Cool, right?
Yes! This is awesome, thank you Steve!

And thank you, of course, for the thoughtful reply to my question and the additional info, press release, etc.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
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Remoteness's Avatar
My pleasure, Luke!

I enjoy responding to this sort of dialog. I'm happy to be able to share my observations, and give advice when applicable. Enlightened conversations are always welcomed on my forum.

I'm going to do my best to gather additional information upfront, before I publish my drum mic setups.

I have buckets of drum setups, which I look forward in posting. In time, you shall see them all.

I trust more folks will post their images and descriptions so we get a better idea on how Remotesters do it across the globe.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lukedamrosch View Post
Yes! This is awesome, thank you Steve!

And thank you, of course, for the thoughtful reply to my question and the additional info, press release, etc.
Old 4 days ago
  #20
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
(...) That is indeed a DPA 5100 surround mic. Only DPA mics were used on that on location capture. As mentioned above, it was a PBS/DTS/DPA collaboration for that 'Next-Generation Live UHDTV experience with HDR and DTS:X Immersive Audio' project we did for PBS.

Here's a link to a PBS press release that explains the Next-Generation Live UHDTV experience with HDR and DTS:X Immersive Audio we were involved with. We truly had a blast working on this seriously cool project (....)
interesting...

...in many ways: having mixed/recorded ca. 5000 shows so far, being a drummer myself, having worked for paiste for a couple of years, having mixed bill cobham countless times (he used to live not far away from here),

i never enjoyd using spaced arrays such as the dpa for any kind of music with lots of transients - which you'll get without any doubt with bill in the seat: i mean, he's one of the most energetic drummers ever!

did you use any additional hidden mics on him and if so, do you happen to remember about mix balance (i know, it's been a few years since then)?

___


btw - still doing ok in ny?!
Old 4 days ago
  #21
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DaveyJones's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post

having mixed/recorded ca. 5000 shows so far!


Crikey deedeeyeah, that is 1 show, everyday, for the last 13 and a half years. You are either very old, or very busy...




Dave
Old 4 days ago
  #22
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJones View Post
Crikey deedeeyeah, that is 1 show, everyday, for the last 13 and a half years. You are either very old, or very busy...

old enough to be an 'endangered species' and somewhat experienced after decades of working in different areas of our profession - but "very, very busy" in these crazy times?! you must be kidding! most gigs got postponed for months, got cancelled altogether or won't come back for other reasons...

...but yeah: i got to work from bozzio to wackerman and from bruford to williams - and with pretty much anyone in between :-)
pretty much the same as steve (i assume) or sam c (who unfortunately just died of this damn virus) and a few others around here?



p.s. forgot to add a pic... - anyone finds out who's kit this is, just from the setup? :-)
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-img_7928.jpg  
Old 4 days ago
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
...or sam c (who unfortunately just died of this damn virus)...
Very sorry to hear this. I only knew him from this forum, but I always enjoyed his considered opinions, even if I was not in agreement. A loss to our community (and not the last, I fear).
Requiescat in pace.
Old 3 days ago
  #24
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad View Post
Very sorry to hear this. I only knew him from this forum, but I always enjoyed his considered opinions, even if I was not in agreement. A loss to our community (and not the last, I fear).
Requiescat in pace.
RIP: Sam Clayton Jr, aka SamC around here...
Old 3 days ago
  #25
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
The Dennis Chambers capture in D.C. for PBS/DTS/DPA and the Billy Cobham live performance recording at The Blue Note have nothing to do with each other. Since DPA was a partner in this on location recording, we only used DPA microphones for that capture.

The Billy Cobham date was for a live record for Half Note Records.

Regarding the Blue Note recording I used the following mics on Billy's drum set...

01 FOOT M88
02 SNARE TLM102
03 SR OH < M160
04 SL OH > M160
05 FLOOR 1 & 2 TLM103
06 RACK 3 & 4 TLM103
07 RACK 1 & 2 TLM103

I have five audience mics in the room, and they were as follows...

14 HL < ROOM DC96B
15 HC ^ ROOM DC96B
16 HR > ROOM DC96B
17 CEILING HL < MKH40
18 CEILING HR > MKH40

In reference to NYC - the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are okay, safe, sound and doing well, although I have lost four friends from this deadly crisis. We are doing our best to stay 'sheltered in place.'


Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
interesting...

...in many ways: having mixed/recorded ca. 5000 shows so far, being a drummer myself, having worked for paiste for a couple of years, having mixed bill cobham countless times (he used to live not far away from here),

i never enjoyd using spaced arrays such as the dpa for any kind of music with lots of transients - which you'll get without any doubt with bill in the seat: i mean, he's one of the most energetic drummers ever!

did you use any additional hidden mics on him and if so, do you happen to remember about mix balance (i know, it's been a few years since then)?

___


btw - still doing ok in ny?!
Old 3 days ago
  #26
Lives for gear
 

much appreciated (and i'm impressed you kept track sheets) - keep safe!
Old 3 days ago
  #27
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
You're welcome...

I have hardcopy documents for (pretty much) every gig I have ever done since the early '80s. Prior to that I rarely kept notes, but every since I worked with Frank Zappa on that history making event when cable TV and FM radio did their first live simulcast broadcast on MTV on October 31st, 1981, I started to keep notes for every project or production ever since.

This information is also part of a large database that can direct me to where the masters are and other pertinent information that's relevant or applicable to any particular gig or project.

It has been quite helpful to me on many occasions. The fact that I can look up what gear was used, what mics were used, and any other relative bit of information. Even where we stayed and what places we frequented, like restaurants, pubs, and such. This makes the advance for future gigs much easier when we are returning to the same venue or location.

Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
much appreciated (and i'm impressed you kept track sheets) - keep safe!
Old 3 days ago
  #28
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness View Post
You're welcome...

I have hardcopy documents for (pretty much) every gig I have ever done since the early '80s. Prior to that I rarely kept notes, but every since I worked with Frank Zappa on that history making event when cable TV and FM radio did their first live simulcast broadcast on MTV on October 31st, 1981, I started to keep notes for every project or production ever since.

This information is also part of a large database that can direct me to where the masters are and other pertinent information that's relevant or applicable to any particular gig or project.

It has been quite helpful to me on many occasions. The fact that I can look up what gear was used, what mics were used, and any other relative bit of information. Even where we stayed and what places we frequented, like restaurants, pubs, and such. This makes the advance for future gigs much easier when we are returning to the same venue or location.
since i've been touring a lot, gear and situations have been changing so much and so often that i eventually gave up making notes: the jazz festival in town got not much to do with touring in africa...

same when working 'at home': i still have an all analog studio yet except for some rare occasions, i'm almost always using my beloved digital desks these days - options are so vastly different that i stick to typical setups, each optimized on its own so i gave up making notes in the hope that i could transfer from one to the other environment...

and then there's the variety of genre: a typical rock/pop/blues stadium gig doesn't have much in common with recording a string quartet in a baroque building etc. - in this case, notes would be useless...

i do however have a pretty strict way how to patch and route things so i mostly know exactly what to expect without labelling the desk or the mutitrack recorder! - and i do keep notes from venues in which i regularly get to work; these include mostly technical details like restrictions for load in, max. weight for the elevator, truss height, power supplies/distribution etc., position of stage racks/amp city etc.

i wish i would have kept a few intineraries/tech specs from some very large productions; if anything, i mostly just kept a badge - here are some of them:
Attached Thumbnails
Pictures of Mic'ed Up Drum Kits Captured On Location or During Live Concert Scenarios-20200403_225226.jpg  
Old 3 days ago
  #29
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Your reasons for not creating hardcopy documents and a database is the reason why I did. And, they included all itineraries, tech riders and all sorts of specs that I retrieved no matter how small or large the productions are.

The reason for this is know exactly what each and every production is all about, so if I go back to that country, or state, or territory, I will have all the information that I gathered as a preparation for the next journey.

Same goes with returning to the same venue, that perhaps, you haven't been there in a while. Knowing the ins/outs of the facility and its crew is paramount for me. YMMV.

Also, if I every write a book or need to (technically) look back at a project I worked on, the digital and (analog) hardcopy docs are there. It has helped more times than not.

I cannot do without my 'On Location Production Files' aka "Location Files."


Quote:
Originally Posted by deedeeyeah View Post
since i've been touring a lot, gear and situations have been changing so much and so often that i eventually gave up making notes: the jazz festival in town got not much to do with touring in africa...

same when working 'at home': i still have an all analog studio yet except for some rare occasions, i'm almost always using my beloved digital desks these days - options are so vastly different that i stick to typical setups, each optimized on its own so i gave up making notes in the hope that i could transfer from one to the other environment...

and then there's the variety of genre: a typical rock/pop/blues stadium gig doesn't have much in common with recording a string quartet in a baroque building etc. - in this case, notes would be useless...

i do however have a pretty strict way how to patch and route things so i mostly know exactly what to expect without labelling the desk or the mutitrack recorder! - and i do keep notes from venues in which i regularly get to work; these include mostly technical details like restrictions for load in, max. weight for the elevator, truss height, power supplies/distribution etc., position of stage racks/amp city etc.

i wish i would have kept a few intineraries/tech specs from some very large productions; if anything, i mostly just kept a badge - here are some of them:
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