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Do you really need to run the entire rig off one outlet?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Do you really need to run the entire rig off one outlet?

Hi, never posted in this forum before on GS, thanks for any guidance in advance.

So I have a studio my dad and I are finishing building in our basement and just passed all electrical inspections today. Before we plug in about 50 pieces of outboard into the new grid we Just wanted to know if that old wives tail that all gear should run off one outlet (or was it one breaker?) whats rule of thumb here?
Old 1 week ago
  #2
If your grounding is done properly it won't matter.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Lives for gear
 

The one outlet/circuit was a simplified way of making sure everything was on the same ground. If all your studio circuits are grounded correctly to the same ground (which they should be), then the "one outlet/circuit" is a meaningless rule.

And generally, if you are running a lot of equipment it is a bad idea to run it all on one circuit anyway because you will overload the circuit or trip the breaker.
Old 1 day ago
  #4
Perfect thank you so much
Old 1 day ago
  #5
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nosebleedaudio's Avatar
 

Just make sure they are on the same Phase in the panel..
The electrician will try and use the typical 2 legs one neutral, I would only use 2 (Or more) circuits with 3 wires per outlet SAME Phase.....
By the way, I have had to correct this many times to reduce hum..
Its NOT the ground, its the SAME phase that makes a big difference.
Old 1 day ago
  #6
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nosebleedaudio View Post
Just make sure they are on the same Phase in the panel..
The electrician will try and use the typical 2 legs one neutral, I would only use 2 (Or more) circuits with 3 wires per outlet SAME Phase.....
By the way, I have had to correct this many times to reduce hum..
Its NOT the ground, its the SAME phase that makes a big difference.
Nitpicking perhaps, but in North America 99.9% of residential wiring and a large percentage of commercial wiring comes from a single phase service. With single phase service, at the main panel there will be two main feed wires: L1 & L2 plus a Neutral wire that is referenced to ground (but distinct from the 'green safety ground'). With three phase service, there are three feed wires: L1, L2 & L3 plus a Neutral . A nominal 120V is available between any "L" wire and Neutral. So nosebleed would be more accurate in stating that all the studio gear should be powered by circuits fed from the same 'L" wire and Neutral; this should not be termed as "on the same Phase in the panel" unless the main service entrance is three-phase (i.e. has L1, L2 & L3 plus a Neutral). I know, semantics...

Also, this thread probably belongs in All Things Technical.

Last edited by jimjazzdad; 1 day ago at 01:58 PM.. Reason: Additional comment
Old 1 day ago
  #7
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nosebleedaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad View Post
Nitpicking perhaps, but in North America 99.9% of residential wiring and a large percentage of commercial wiring comes from a single phase service. With single phase service, at the main panel there will be two main feed wires: L1 & L2 plus a Neutral wire that is referenced to ground (but distinct from the 'green safety ground'). With three phase service, there are three feed wires: L1, L2 & L3 plus a Neutral . A nominal 120V is available between any "L" wire and Neutral. So nosebleed would be more accurate in stating that all the studio gear should be powered by circuits fed from the same 'L" wire and Neutral; this should not be termed as "on the same Phase in the panel" unless the main service entrance is three-phase (i.e. has L1, L2 & L3 plus a Neutral). I know, semantics...

Also, this thread probably belongs in All Things Technical.
Yes I know, I also called it Leg, so was trying to use terminology most electricians use, I use to do that as well..
So yes, single phase, but they are 180 degrees out of phase with each other..
Now we only use Neutral when its equal between the two Lines, other wise its called a "Grounded conductor" Which is what a "Neutral" is also..

This CAN be confusing, since three phase is a Time spacing between any two/three hot legs/Lines..
Old 23 hours ago
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

I'd further suggest from nosebleed's correct description that it's most important for the analog signal components. The purely digital components, computers and the like, are not so affected. The problem of loading all your studio on only one of the two service legs is seriously unbalancing the service feed. The non analog signal components can be grouped on the other leg, leaving the chosen analog signal components on the relatively clean leg.

Tom
Old 20 hours ago
  #9
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nosebleedaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tailspn View Post
I'd further suggest from nosebleed's correct description that it's most important for the analog signal components. The purely digital components, computers and the like, are not so affected. The problem of loading all your studio on only one of the two service legs is seriously unbalancing the service feed. The non analog signal components can be grouped on the other leg, leaving the chosen analog signal components on the relatively clean leg.

Tom
Plus it takes a LOT out outboard gear to add up up to 15 amps..A LOT...
Old 20 hours ago
  #10
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by nosebleedaudio View Post
Plus it takes a LOT out outboard gear to add up up to 15 amps..A LOT...
True. Unless its all tube gear

And its seldom ever an issue on a typical remote location gig (unless you're like Steve Remote with one of his trucks full of gear, in which case you may well have your own power). With the average remote gig, if you can plug a power bar into a circuit that's not shared by lighting or other noise-generating loads, you're usually set. Old churches can sometimes be challenging.

But the OP was talking about wiring a studio, which is really a different thing altogether.
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