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Advice about Conservatory of Recording Arts and Sciences
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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Advice about Conservatory of Recording Arts and Sciences

Hello,
I am a senior in high school who graduates in may. After exploring the many possibilities of college, I decided that college wasn't the route that would best suit me. I then decided to look into career schools that aim to teach about Professional audio production, and I came across CRAS, after completing the application, I got a call to arrange a date for my phone interview. This phone interview determines whether I get accepted or not.

What are your opinions about this school?
Any personal experiences?

Thank you!
Old 1 week ago
  #2
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

This is the one in Tempe? I don't know anything about that one other than that their website lists 10 sales reps and doesn't tell you what tuition costs.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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@ Brent Hahn , Yes, this is the one in Tempe, and after calling them, they told me that tuition is generally around $22,000. I appreciate your reply!
Old 1 week ago
  #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyng_the_poet View Post
@ Brent Hahn , Yes, this is the one in Tempe, and after calling them, they told me that tuition is generally around $22,000. I appreciate your reply!
22k a year?
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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TVPostSound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyng_the_poet View Post
This phone interview determines whether I get accepted or not.

Thank you!
You: Hello?

School: Do you have 22k to pay tuition?

You: Yes

School: You are accepted!!!
Old 1 week ago
  #6
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TVPostSound's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
This is the one in Tempe? I don't know anything about that one other than that their website lists 10 sales reps and doesn't tell you what tuition costs.
Buried deep inside their site, its 27k without housing.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVPostSound View Post
Buried deep inside their site, its 27k without housing.
The Yelp reviews are interesting. The "not recommended" ones are probably, on average, more authentic.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
22k a year?
it's an 11 month program, however, the last two months are spent in internships.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TVPostSound View Post
Buried deep inside their site, its 27k without housing.
After completing their tuition calculator, the estimated cost comes to about $28,616.00
Old 1 week ago
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyng_the_poet View Post
After completing their tuition calculator, the estimated cost comes to about $28,616.00
And where's the dough coming from?
Old 1 week ago
  #11
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What are your goals? What do you want to do with this training?
Old 1 week ago
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shosty View Post
What are your goals? What do you want to do with this training?
I want to become a professional audio engineer.
Old 1 week ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
And where's the dough coming from?
I have worked construction last summer, and will be this summer. After this summer I'll have an estimated $12,000. I am also looking to apply for scholarships.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
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i dunno about your country/place but around here (switzerland - and in a few neighbouring countries), there are lots of folks who attended some kind of program but will not get a job unless they are prepared to work for almost no money... - there are simply too many folks in the exact same position and our industry cannot feed them!

'teaching' has become a huge business, even here in the old world (a few years later as usual)... - i'd rather spend money on some gear and start working o small things with friends, maybe even pay to sit in for a month in a large studio or with a rental company. also, there's so much literature and videos available these days that i wouldn't waste money on just any kind of privately run music school at whatever level!
Old 1 week ago
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyng_the_poet View Post
I want to become a professional audio engineer.
There are so many different areas and branches of this. Which style of music do you want to focus on? Are you interested in on-location recording, studio work, mastering?
Old 1 week ago
  #16
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I had a neighbor who attended the school mentioned. It was quite expensive, he was an older guy who had already had many jobs and so paid for it himself. The school's idea of internships after graduation included some very exploitive gofer work under bad conditions at some "studios" that were really fronts for some other semi-legit businesses (and who "churned" their intern staff every few months, with no further work allowed after that period), stints at Guitar Center and Radio Shack and then nothing. He eventually established a small recording "practice" through contacts he'd made by playing in local bands, and put together a small studio of his own, which never really paid for itself (he had a wife with a good job). He was lucky in that he'd cashed-out the school with his savings; I've had a few assistants who are still struggling to pay off debt to similar schools while having virtually no prospects in the audio business. Make sure you have a real financial plan for this venture, or don't do it. The degree from such a place does not mean much to a lot of people in the industry--they are looking for entry level do-anything helpers, not "engineers". If you have to kind of starve while you work your way in, better to not have a big debt burden, right?
Old 1 week ago
  #17
For profit arts trade schools are almost always a scam that promise everything and deliver little. I know, I taught at one. Better to get a real education in college and intern at a studio.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
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Plush's Avatar
A lot cheaper than Northwestern University's "Sound Arts and Industries" master's program. It costs $62,000 per year not including room / board.
Old 1 week ago
  #20
If you are not working in audio on a REGULAR BASIS (preferably daily), you will not be ready to work when you are done with school. Would you go to school for an instrument and not practice? For composition and not write?

For consideration: weekly church services, assisting conference AV, hanging at a studio, recording every day with friends, working a festival stage, shadowing at a club or coffee house, audio for a film, volunteering at a high school or community theater. Anything.

So... worth it? Maybe. Just think of the school as one *small* part of your overall education and development. Start practicing now.

Last edited by NorseHorse; 1 week ago at 06:25 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #21
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Some of these for-profit schools play into a young person's ignorant laziness and possibly their parents desire to write a check and make their kid's career development become a sure thing. There are people who enter these schools figuring that the school is all they have to do to immediately be seated in the "big chair" at a real recording studio or etc.. As you might expect, the people who succeed the best after attending those schools are the ones who were hardworking, motivated and already consumed by the profession 24/7 before they started there. So maybe...some experience first, so you understand better what you are being sold by these schools? Not to mention completing a general education at a college level that will help you for the rest of your life, no matter what field you end up in?
Old 1 week ago
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philper View Post
As you might expect, the people who succeed the best after attending those schools are the ones who were hardworking, motivated and already consumed by the profession 24/7 before they started there.
Agreed. Actually, the kids I've seen who use full-time recording school to its greatest advantage are the ones who take advantage of their Student Visa to stay in the US for an extended period, going to school MF 9-5 (more like 10-2, actually) and hustling the rest of the time.
Old 1 week ago
  #23
To the OP. I have three friends who went to Full Sail (very expensive for their parents). They all graduated (one at the top of his class) and are now doing the following: One is working at the local Guitar Center, one is a Verizon Cell Phone salesman and one is living at home with his parents and looking for work. Most "for profit" schools are exactly that, for profit. They want you to get a certificate and then find a job so they can tout your placement in the audio profession. You cannot, in most cases, transfer your credits like you can from an accredited institution, university, college or school which means that if you want to go on to a four year degree granting, accredited school NONE of your credits will transfer and you will have to start all over again. Maybe look into going to a local community college, save some money and buy some gear and get started on your own. In today's market place having a degree from a non accredited school is honestly not worth much. You have to decide what it is that you want to do but i would look around to see what other choices you have that maybe make more sense.

Last edited by Thomas W. Bethe; 3 days ago at 01:59 PM.. Reason: Spelling
Old 1 week ago
  #24
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By now you're probably detecting a fair degree of caution in all the advice above here...and I think it's well founded. The training > career path structures that existed long ago aren't there any longer, so past your internship you'll be very much on your own.

Rather than waiting for one of theses academies/colleges to create your opportunities for you...why not step out in front of the pack and invent your own.

Regardless of whether you see yourself in 10 years time running a studio or working PA systems in a conference centre, there's much you can do now to immerse yourself in the basics of sound recording and broadcast....and it probably won't cost you anything !

You could offer your services to a community radio station, learning how to run the mixing board and prep up their broadcast studios at each change of program shift.

Find a local PA hire company and offer to assist with toting cabinets, laying cables, learn the essentials of signal fault tracing, maintenance and soldering. Assist setting up at your local worship hall or church, perhaps recording their services and arranging to distribute these to the ill and elderly members who can't get there on a Sunday.

There are numerous niches and opportunities to immerse yourself in the many and varied aspects of audio engineering in your community...and if you choose wisely these will usually come with inbuilt tutorship and experienced guidance from elders.

You can flesh out such practical experience with theory studies online and from books, make contact with ham radio guys and learn from their experience.

Any one of these avenues could blossom out into a part-time work opportunity...if you show enthusiasm and willingness to learn. If you structure your own experiences like this, you'll gain as much or more knowledge than your compadres in the audio-eng course...and you'll be better placed to say yes if/when more secure employment is offered !

Make a point to delve into as many areas as you can, but don't leave any of these before you've acquired a good working knowledge of what it means to operate with competence and resourcefulness, make your mark...leave an impression on their minds.

CRAS = mercenary, crass...be self-sufficient and self-directed: it's the route to offering so much value to an organization that they can't fail to recognize your competence.... and reward it with employment !!
Old 5 days ago
  #25
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I appreciate all the advice given and will deeply consider it all. Thank you all so much for all of your concern and time to reply! If anybody has any more advice, do not fail to share it, thank you!
Old 5 days ago
  #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shosty View Post
There are so many different areas and branches of this. Which style of music do you want to focus on? Are you interested in on-location recording, studio work, mastering?
I'm more interested in mastering. My musical interests actually aren't specific to any certain genre. My personal favorites are R&B, Alternative rock, Pop, and Rap. I also love to write.
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