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So, How Long Have You Been Involved in Location Recording & Production?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
So, How Long Have You Been Involved in Location Recording & Production?

Here's my timeline...

1975 -- Hobby
1976 -- Hobby turns into serious interest.
1977 -- Serious interest turns into starting Aura-Sonic, Ltd., a mobile & location recording business.
2020 -- Still at it and loving every minute of it...


Well, almost every minute of it.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #2
Lives for gear
 
emrr's Avatar
If recording your own gigs counts, it starts 1987. Training, 1990. Work for other people, 1994. I spend most of my time in studio, but there’s a mix of live music shows, webcast and broadcast, and records made on location.

Last edited by emrr; 2 weeks ago at 08:20 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
1970 for me. A year later I was location recording my College's music program. I grew up in LA surrounded by the best in the music biz.

At Cal State I kept hearing this phrase: "Too many mixers, not enough fixers". I had an electronics/music background so I merged them.

Last edited by Jim Williams; 6 days ago at 06:47 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
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loujudson's Avatar
1966, high school choir and band:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2ySYPenFn8

I played bass, made the recording, and sang on this. My first record!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #5
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tourtelot's Avatar
Mid-1970's working for See Factor, Weisberg Sound, Clair Bros. Audio and Record Plant NYC. Lots of different sound "jobs" since then but still doing it.

D.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #6
Lives for gear
1965, I started working for a World Broadcaster, then moved into Metropolitan film for TV and thence to a Region specialising in the Natural World, Music and Arts, Anthropology and Drama.
I was made redundant in 92 and became a freelance and worked for the same clients for another 15 yrs, then I took up recording Classical music.
Its been a great journey.
Roger
Old 2 weeks ago
  #7
Lives for gear
 

1978*

my drum teacher took me to an orchestra recording, intended for a radio broadcast...

...which led to assisting the engineer (who became my mentor) for 15 years.

___


*i was rather young back then though; it took another 4 years before i did the first recording on my own. i went a different road for higher education, kept working as a freelancer in different music-related business before becoming a professional in 1987.

___


i enjoy working in different areas of our profession: live sound, touring, studio, some studio design, installations, location recording, broadcasting, a bit of teaching.

i also enjoy working with a variety of genre (from classical music to jazz to r'n'r) and with different art form and in much different situations (from ballet to festivals).

and i enjoy doing something completely different, unrelated to music in my other life!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
I carried around cassette recorders ever since the day I walked into the local big box store, looking for some kind of "nice" little reel-to-reel, and all they had was this whole new technology, machines that only played reels of tape housed in little plastic casings!

I can remember sitting in the sunset with my buddies in a half-built track house, for some reason taping our musings, maybe because it was my last day before heading off to college... and when I listened back, the battery had been draining out, so our conversation accelerated into chipmunk-talk and finally into dizzying sizzle.

I had a proto-walkman style unit when we were busted, on one of my returns to the hometown, and I sure kept it rolling during the encounter. I had a show on the radio (@ San Francisco State College) and the drawling copper, ordering us around, called me "Show on The Radio," as in, "you, Show on The Radio, you stand over here..." and in the peculiarest twist of all, these public servants found, out in the school yard playing field, the top of my friend Scott's six-shooter (drug paraphernalia reference from the 70's, a pipe with six rotating bowls) and then, in a burst of staggeringy surprising leniency, sent us off with the gizmo and a warning. (Later in a sarcastic mood I mashed up the tape with the cartoon theme song that went, "Now promenade all around the room, and find yourself a good seat! The Show's a'gonna be starting soon, time to watch... time to watch... time to watch....)

I had a nicer, mono recorder with a manual gain setting, which was a huge leap forward--the automatic level controls of those first generation apparati were immensely frustrating to work with-- and recorded Moby Grape at a DAY ON THE GRASS afternoon concert/celebration/rally in the city.

So, what, starting in the middle/late 1970's, to answer the question. Something nigh on 40 odd years?... some of them very odd indeed.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
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Plush's Avatar
1965--had a Sony tape recorder. Lugged it out with some Sony mics to record an interview with an exchange student from France.

1974-1976-recording concerts at Northwestern University. I was a student there and they had built Pick-Staiger Hall, a brand new hall with good recording equipment. The rest is history.

1979-1982, 1991-1992--did sound design for Remains Theatre in Chicago

1981-founded Ealing Mobile Recording, classical music recording company.

1986-1987-side job--worked at Studio Sonics Corp selling Studer and Stellavox.

2008--changed the name of the company to Atelier HudSonic

Now 39 years in the business.

the rest is history.

Last edited by Plush; 1 week ago at 08:33 PM..
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Lives for gear
 
jimjazzdad's Avatar
1972 - I became involved with university radio and had my first close encounter with an Ampex 351...and I went on to become an AV technician.
1975 - My 1st attempt at a 'taper' recording - Pink Floyd using a Uher Report 4400 (a dismal failure).
1975 - My 2nd attempt at a live recording - a big band summer lawn party, again with the Uher (success this time!).
2008 - after a long hiatus of 30 years in an unrelated career, I started recording live performances of a young jazz singer (my daughter!) using a Korg D888...and I never looked back!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Long story short:

--1967:
borrowed and pawnshop tape decks, music recording and radio/sound art. Boundless enthusiasm, good health and no knowledge, experience or industry connections whatsoever.


--2020:
better gear, still pretty down for any sort of recording and still making radio/sound art (my 19th album released in 2019!); health less great, have gained some hard-won experience and a reputation of sorts!
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
Lives for gear
 

Started in 1980 as a volunteer at the Cherry Tree Music Co-op ( a now closed folk club in Philadelphia) where I learned how to do live sound and live recording.
Since then I have done archive recording in a 200 yr old barn (wonderfully naturally warm acoustics) at the Old Songs Festival of Traditional Music and Dance near Albany. I have branched out in genres to add live classical music (Chestnut Street Singers, Wayne Oratorio Society), jazz-multiple live concert videos (and some live sound) for Phyllis Chapell, world music-live sound and recording. I love the variety and love supporting
music and musicians ( nice people without big egos)
I like as a volunteer. (Always situations where if I didn’t volunteer it wouldn’t happen at all or only with someone’s smartphone. The other advantage of being a volunteer is that my gear is covered by my Homeowner’s insurance. Otherwise it cost me
$1000 or more per year).
Being part of the folk music scene was a nice balance
to the stress of medical school, residency and being
a pediatrician. Being retired now I have lots more time and energy to enjoy the music and learn new skills.

Last edited by Folkie; 2 weeks ago at 12:10 PM.. Reason: added comments
Old 2 weeks ago
  #13
Gear Addict
 

1984: after teen years with soldering iron in hand, started at UCL and spent 3 years at Film Soc with occasional academic study - deeply immersed in Nagra, Revox B77 and sepmag (and, occasionally, the Arri). Also 35mm projectionist during those years at the Bloomsbury Theatre (good experience at the other end).

Didn't become Christopher Nolan (another alumnus), and did little recording in the later 80s or 90s, but from the early 2000s - with the dropping costs of gear (I was never going to buy a 16mm camera and Nagra myself!) - have re-immersed myself first in film and then increasingly in sound (both recording and live mixing), all strictly amateur and not encroaching where professionals might tread. As with Folkie, it's been light relief!
Old 1 week ago
  #14
1962 started my college career at Ohio University. Did a lot of "on location" music recordings for the RTV department

1964 started my own business, Mark Infinity Sound, doing recordings using an Altec M-21 (https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/altec_...phone_21b.html) and an Ampex 601 mono tape machine that I bought in Columbus, OH from a recording studio. My first record was the Gamertsfelder Hall Glee Club.

1966 Drafted into the US Army. I did home town interviews and was the voice of Fort Campbell, KY

1969 Worked for WVIZ-TV as an audio engineer and did lots of studio and remote recordings.

1969 Went to work at Oberlin College as Director of Audio Services and Concert Sound. I did over 3000 live concert recordings while there.

1995 Started my own company Acoustik Musik, Ltd, and I am still doing remote recordings and mastering and restorations. I also have another company that does video work called Room with a View Productions.

That's about all to my career.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
...and, when do you think you're gonna retired?

I have considered it from time to time, yet never make the effort to make it so.
I have too many thinks I still want to accomplish.
What say you?
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Lives for gear
 

Retire? And do what? Die?
Old 1 week ago
  #17
I feel like for people in my generation, “location recording” is far more the norm than the exception.

I bought a Presonus Firepod in 2006 and that started the journey; first house songwriter demos with friends, then house tracks, then house EP’s, then house records. I look back on those times of recording whole bands in the friend-with-the-high-ceilings house/apartment living room with much fondness and nostalgia.

I really got into classical recording the year after I finished undergrad, when a friend asked me to accompany on his senior recital and I had to practice my ass off on piano to prepare (all of my studies have been in trumpet, fwiw). I don’t know exactly why that was the trigger, or why I said yes, but it was a pivotal couple of months for me.

Since then, it’s been 10ish years of learning, practicing, getting fortunate with the opportunities and jobs available and offered to me. Lately most of work hasn’t been so remote, and I am so grateful to finally have a steady job (and a union job at that!) on which to build a life outside of work.

I’ve been very fortunate to turn my great passion and onetime hobby into a profession and daily practice. It’s pretty great.
Old 1 week ago
  #18
Tom, I didn’t know all that about you. I grew up on WVIZ!

That’s a great career, man. One to be proud of.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
1962 started my college career at Ohio University. Did a lot of "on location" music recordings for the RTV department

1964 started my own business, Mark Infinity Sound, doing recordings using an Altec M-21 (https://www.radiomuseum.org/r/altec_...phone_21b.html) and an Ampex 601 mono tape machine that I bought in Columbus, OH from a recording studio. My first record was the Gamertsfelder Hall Glee Club.

1966 Drafted into the US Army. I did home town interviews and was the voice of Fort Campbell, KY

1969 Worked for WVIZ-TV as an audio engineer and did lots of studio and remote recordings.

1969 Went to work at Oberlin College as Director of Audio Services and Concert Sound. I did over 3000 live concert recordings while there.

1995 Started my own company Acoustik Musik, Ltd, and I am still doing remote recordings and mastering and restorations. I also have another company that does video work called Room with a View Productions.

That's about all to my career.
Old 1 week ago
  #19
Lives for gear
 
loujudson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by philper View Post
Retire? And do what? Die?
I think I retired when I was about 22. I was pretty much a wild hippie (IT WAS 1972) and took 10 or 15 years to become self supporting. Now I lok on that as my retirment, and now I can't afford to "retire" so I will work until I can't any more!
Old 1 week ago
  #20
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hbphotoav's Avatar
 

1964- Learned how to turn on/off the DuKane amplifier at my Dad's church in Cadiz, Ohio.
1965- Got a trombone.
1966- Got a camera (Argus C3). Built a darkroom.
1968- Got a guitar, in Barberton, Ohio. Also got Pentax SLR with a prime and a telephoto for Christmas.
1969- Used my Dad's Wollensak and Shure 565SD pair (which I still own) to record my HS jazz band (bass trombonist). Also met my first PA, a Shure VocalMaster, on tour (cross country USA, Northern Europe) with Continental Singers. A light went on. In my brain.
1970- Got a Nikkormat. Got a lot of pictures in the HS yearbook. Chicks bought them. I made money. Light went on. Again. Started college at Asbury in Kentucky. Shot pictures for the yearbook and ran their VocalMaster.
1971- Rode a Honda CB750 Four across the country and back with two buddies all summer. Travel. Nice.
1972- Transferred to Baylor University. Got a job shooting photos for the daily paper. Bought a nice stereo, including a TEAC 450 cassette recorder.
1973- Got a job shooting pictures for a church directory company. Put 140,000 miles on two vehicles before graduation. Travel. Work, but nice. Bought a biamped Altec A7 PA and a Peavey Stereo 800 mixer.
1975- Graduated BA/Journalism. Bought a pair of Primo mics and a pair of Sony C55s, and a TEAC A3340S. Recorded everything I could, including two church choral LPs. Mixed a production of "Godspell".
1977- Got married to my first wife, went to work for the phone company in Mansfield, OH. Started mixing and live-recording a great little gospel/rock band.
1979- Got sick of corporate life. Moved back to Texas. Took photos, did some weekend DJ, sold stereos, engineered a demo studio, had a kid.
1981- Moved back to Mansfield, OH. Did some live sound. Played bass in a 3-piece, my one "paying" music gig. Did commercial photography in a studio, mostly microwaves and industrial pumps. Got laid off.
1982- Moved to NashVegas. Had another kid. Opened a commercial photo studio. Did live sound and weekend DJ. Recorded church music events.
1996- Became a touring video director, 5-years, spring/fall runs. Built a nice controlled SD system. Unfortunately, I still have it.
1997- Got involved live-recording (audio and video) the annual International Church Music Festival at Bern, Coventry, Chester, and Rome, until 2010.
2000- Stopped doing weekend DJ. Started doing location photo coverage and audio/visual production for corporate events around the country.
2002- Spent 12 years with a church plant, as audio visual provider (ElectroVoice Entertainer 200) and consultant (d+b Audiotechnik array system, M7CL48). Continued roadwork with national clients.
2020- Still serving the AV clients and Photo clients I care to work for; contract audio consultant/live sound mix for two private schools and two churches; live concert PA, recording, editing and/or mixing when I can, and sleeping late at every opportunity.

I have had the enviable "job" (since 1982) of figuring out how to make a living playing with my toys, while making friends on most of the continents, paying off a house, enjoying grandkids, nice coffees, tasty beers and (of late) fine bourbons. Still married to my first wife.

In the words of the inimitable Joe Walsh... "Life's Been Good To Me (So Far)"... and I'm grateful.

I'm also grateful for the education, discussion and fellowship that this here bunch of fine folks has provided since my dear friend Rich Mays ("Sonare"... RIP) said, in 2008, to me... "You may want to check out the forum over on Gearslutz called Remote Possibilities"... He was not wrong.

Cheers, all. And, Thanks.

HB

Last edited by hbphotoav; 1 week ago at 05:59 AM..
Old 6 days ago
  #21
Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post
Tom, I didn’t know all that about you. I grew up on WVIZ!

That’s a great career, man. One to be proud of.
Thanks!!!
Old 3 days ago
  #22
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by loujudson View Post
I think I retired when I was about 22. I was pretty much a wild hippie (IT WAS 1972) and took 10 or 15 years to become self supporting. Now I lok on that as my retirment, and now I can't afford to "retire" so I will work until I can't any more!
I empathize with how you feel about retiring when you were about 22 years old

I definitely love what I do for a living.
Old 3 days ago
  #23
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by philper View Post
Retire? And do what? Die?
Exactly!
Old 2 days ago
  #24
Someone once said that the most important thing is to find something you love to do more than anything else. If you fortunate it will also be something you are also very good at.

Then you wake up every day looking forward to it, not retirement. You can sleep when you are dead.
Old 2 days ago
  #25
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loujudson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Someone once said that the most important thing is to find something you love to do more than anything else. If you fortunate it will also be something you are also very good at.

Then you wake up every day looking forward to it, not retirement. You can sleep when you are dead.
This is good, Jim, but there is a third factor: Love to do, good at, but will it make money?

I did live sound and recording for about 20 years before it really paid my way (but then I'm not the entrepreneur or corporate type. You need to choose your clients well. Took me a long time to realize that.
Old 2 days ago
  #26
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Someone once said that the most important thing is to find something you love to do more than anything else. If you fortunate it will also be something you are also very good at.

Then you wake up every day looking forward to it, not retirement. You can sleep when you are dead.
Brilliant!
Old 1 day ago
  #27
I wonder... most everybody "enjoys" music, but I think maybehaps your quintessential remotester might deserve a clinical diagnosis of "stubbornly, rabidly, compulsively fixated on music and/or obsessed with its capture," like the lieutenant on The Fugitive.

Like, to me there's no question that it's an important thing to preserve, for all time, the brilliant output of musicians and other artists, and even drummers ( ) rather than these efforts just drifting off into space, lost except for their memory.

In ancient times we would've been the scribes around Homer or the transcriptionists for Stephen Foster or the shamen of the village, perfecting the chants. It's a timeless lure-- you need to transcend your daily existence, and experience a sonority that explains it all... simply irresistible, eh?
Old 1 day ago
  #28
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
I like your perspective. I've met folks that feel like this about their work. It's quite a special way to look at it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
I wonder... most everybody "enjoys" music, but I think maybehaps your quintessential remotester might deserve a clinical diagnosis of "stubbornly, rabidly, compulsively fixated on music and/or obsessed with its capture," like the lieutenant on The Fugitive.

Like, to me there's no question that it's an important thing to preserve, for all time, the brilliant output of musicians and other artists, and even drummers ( ) rather than these efforts just drifting off into space, lost except for their memory.

In ancient times we would've been the scribes around Homer or the transcriptionists for Stephen Foster or the shamen of the village, perfecting the chants. It's a timeless lure-- you need to transcend your daily existence, and experience a sonority that explains it all... simply irresistible, eh?
Old 1 day ago
  #29
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelpatterson View Post
I wonder... most everybody "enjoys" music, but I think maybehaps your quintessential remotester might deserve a clinical diagnosis of "stubbornly, rabidly, compulsively fixated on music and/or obsessed with its capture," like the lieutenant on The Fugitive.

Like, to me there's no question that it's an important thing to preserve, for all time, the brilliant output of musicians and other artists, and even drummers ( ) rather than these efforts just drifting off into space, lost except for......
I dunno Joel, I think there’s a place for forgetting, for not scrupulously recording every tree that falls in the forest....just because modern tech allows you to do so ? There’s a place also for discernment and selectivity, otherwise you’re just an indiscriminate logging recorder....simply cos you can ?! Posterity won’t necessarily thank you for it...you also need to allow some of the detritus to fall to the forest floor, become compost...
Old 22 hours ago
  #30
Right-o, and somehow it seems to always work out that if I'm hired to document something, it's usually very worthwhile: a rehearsed group of talented performers in a lushly reverberant hall or finely tuned stage in a club.

Although I can easily imagine myself at Steve Foster's feet, jotting down every last wisp of an idea, and him grabbing the sheet of paper out of my hands and shrieking, " 'Moon, June, Daniel Boone'-- look, I was just free associating! You're going to make me sound like an idiot!" and crumpling it and tossing it into the dust bin.
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