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Nevaton MC59
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Gear Head
 

Nevaton MC59

Hi! Anybody has tried the Nevaton MC59 microphones? I was surprised by the ridiculously low self noise and the reasonable price.
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Gear Maniac
 
DaveyJones's Avatar
 

I have not tried but I'm equally interested.

Any takers? Also impressive is the small for factor; smaller, perhaps, than even the new Schoeps body?
Old 6 days ago
  #3
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mljung's Avatar
The Nevaton Website say's: Very low self noise (5 dBA) coupled with high SPL handling (140dB), I wonder how this was measured. If it's actually that much better than so many other contenders in the small or medium diaphragm area, they must have invented something out of the microphone world. Very curious about them...

::
Mads
Old 6 days ago
  #4
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by mljung View Post
The Nevaton Website say's: Very low self noise (5 dBA) coupled with high SPL handling (140dB), I wonder how this was measured. If it's actually that much better than so many other contenders in the small or medium diaphragm area, they must have invented something out of the microphone world. Very curious about them...

::
Mads
From memory, only the Rode NT-1a equals that 5dBA self noise, and that's an LD mic (easier to achieve with a larger capsule)
Old 5 days ago
  #5
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by studer58 View Post
From memory, only the Rode NT-1a equals that 5dBA self noise, and that's an LD mic (easier to achieve with a larger capsule)
The LDC Lewitt LCT 540 Subzero claims 4 dB(A) self-noise and 41 mV/Pa sensitivity, which Lewitt says results in a mic with "self-noise below the threshold of human hearing". I believe I read that laws of physics set the 'minimum' self-noise threshold at 4 dB due to the characteristics of the movement of air molecules. Anyway, its very surprising that a SDC mic like the Nevaton MC59 would have a self-noise figure of 5 dB(A); it will be interesting to hear what the GS community thinks of it.

Last edited by jimjazzdad; 5 days ago at 02:32 PM..
Old 5 days ago
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad View Post
The LDC Lewitt LCT 540 Subzero claims 4 dB(A) self-noise and 41 mV/Pa sensitivity, which Lewitt says results in a mic with "self-noise below the threshold of human hearing". I believe I read that laws of physics set the 'minimum' self-noise threshold at 4 dB due to the characteristics of the movement of air molecules. Anyway, its very surprising that a SDC mic like the Nevaton MC59 would have a self-noise figure of 5 dB(A); it will be interesting to hear what the GS community thinks of it.
I'd be worried that tinnitus might kick in while using a mic that quiet....as if to supply some modicum of 'natural background noise' in the almost complete absence of it in the mic ....
Old 4 days ago
  #7
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Earcatcher's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjazzdad View Post
The LDC Lewitt LCT 540 Subzero claims 4 dB(A) self-noise and 41 mV/Pa sensitivity, which Lewitt says results in a mic with "self-noise below the threshold of human hearing". I believe I read that laws of physics set the 'minimum' self-noise threshold at 4 dB due to the characteristics of the movement of air molecules. Anyway, its very surprising that a SDC mic like the Nevaton MC59 would have a self-noise figure of 5 dB(A); it will be interesting to hear what the GS community thinks of it.
Don't forget that the MC59's membrane is 20mm in diameter, which is more than most SDCs.

I heard some samples of the MC59: they have a rather smooth sound with a little "sparkle" in the top end. Overall "weight" of the wide cardioid capsule was a little lighter than Schoeps Mk21. The different capsules however do not share the same frequency response, so they are not as predictable as the Schoeps capsule family. The Nevaton MC49 has a sound which appeals a bit more to me, but it doesn't have such low noise as the MC59.
Old 4 days ago
  #8
Lives for gear
It's helpful to remember that there can be variation in the type and spectra of noise that manifests itself in microphones...somewhat similar to the varieties of noise shaping employed in the family of dithering algorithms.

Most mic noise down at the minimal end (4-5dB ?) is probably going to be thermal or (non Boris) Johnson noise, but there can also be LF hum, RF breakthrough, hiss etc and the relative distribution of this across the audible spectrum will determine how easily it's detected or masked in human hearing, and the weighting measure applied will also reflect this.
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