The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
Considering Mic Upgrades For Orchestral
Old 2 weeks ago
  #61
Lives for gear
 
tourtelot's Avatar
Yes, in fact. The only place I have ever used them is as string spots. I don't do much large-scale work like that even in the best of times so they really just sit in the locker. I would take that money and put it into something I can use now.

Tequila!

D.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #62
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jnorman View Post
Okay, I think we have cleared things up quite well for Sean now...
If you call having a nervous breakdown "cleared up."
Old 2 weeks ago
  #63
Lives for gear
 

There is an opinion thread on the subject

‘Anyone try the Schoeps MK5 against single capsules?’

on gearslutz
Old 2 weeks ago
  #64
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by emenelton View Post
There is an opinion thread on the subject

‘Anyone try the Schoeps MK5 against single capsules?’

on gearslutz
Yes, lots of them, in fact! Nothing clearly conclusive, I'd say, with the one consensus being that Schoeps mics are really good.

All this discussion of omni mains has raised a couple of new questions for me, though. First, it's interesting that Richard King recommends using the conductor's podium as a rough measure for the AB mic spacing, which is about 1-1.5m. Most everybody else around here suggests considerably closer spacing, down to as low as 67cm. Curious.

Also, I'm wondering if folks opt for different mains configurations (namely ORTF or NOS) when soloists invade the front of the stage. I've found pianos behind conductors and soloists and vocalists downstage from the strings to be a bit disruptive to my carefully laid plans for recording the orchestra. Anybody else?
Old 2 weeks ago
  #65
There’s no perfect solution, it’s really down to taste. Lots of people use 3 mics in a tree or m3 configuration, too.

You might listen to a bunch of 90’s and 2000’s Richard King orchestral recordings, and Tony Faulkner recordings from the same period, and see what soundstage you prefer. It’s a generalization, but Tony would have tended towards the omnis at 66cm and Richard at a meter+.... though that won’t have been the only variable Contributing to the final sound of a recording, it might give some sense of where you want to start.

Soloists are invariably going to be a factor for live concert recording. It’s just something else being taken into account when setting up. I’ve not found any bulletproof solutions to keeping them in perspective and in balance. Best advice is to make sure you get a soundcheck with the soloist, so you can make any necessary adjustments.

I guess one other thing I’d recommend is having the ability to go higher than you might think necessary, up to 12 feet or more. Adding height to a pair at the front of the ensemble can help even out the balance and perspective between upstage and downstage elements, so if your soloist is too loud or too present, moving the mics up higher can help to even this out, though you may find you need to compensate by pulling the mics a little downstage if the orchestral focus or balance shifts too much to the rear of the ensemble. Having a boom on your stand can come in very handy here too, if you end up with a lack of flexibility in where your stand’s footprint needs to go.

It can also help to spot some of the vulnerable sections within the orchestra, as well as the soloist, giving a bit more flexibility if certain parts are getting lost, though this isn’t always practical for live event recording.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #66
Lives for gear
 

All good advice, thanks. I can't put all of it into practice due to the limitations of my specific recording scenarios, but if nothing else it's comforting to hear there are no bulletproof solutions. Given that I've actually been pretty pleased with what I've gotten from the outside omnis in my four-mic arrays, I'll likely lean toward the narrower spacing. I can also keep an ORTF pair in the middle as a safety, and I use a Latch Lake stand with a boom, so I should be able to try a little more height for the complex soloist setups.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #67
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanmccoy View Post
As long as they don't lose the magic.
as much as i like my gear, it consists of a bunch of (selected) tools: there's no 'magic' in any of them!

[ocassionally there is magic in a performance/concert (which doesn't get affected by the choice of gear), more often in people's thinking though (which then does affect their choice of gear)...
Old 2 weeks ago
  #68
Lives for gear
 
wildplum's Avatar
I am going to go in a little different direction. If you are profitable with your current set up and your clients are happy, why endure the extra expense? What do you gain for the cost; what is the goal?

Now, I am not saying don't buy the new mics (this is GS after all), only that perhaps a cost/benefits analysis might be in order. Certainly you (or your mate) can find something to do with the extra bread. On the other hand, if the analysis supports the new purchase...
Old 1 week ago
  #69
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wildplum View Post
I am going to go in a little different direction. If you are profitable with your current set up and your clients are happy, why endure the extra expense? What do you gain for the cost; what is the goal?

Now, I am not saying don't buy the new mics (this is GS after all), only that perhaps a cost/benefits analysis might be in order. Certainly you (or your mate) can find something to do with the extra bread. On the other hand, if the analysis supports the new purchase...
Yeah this is Gearslutz, and "cost/benefits analysis" and "Gearslutz" make for strange bedfellows.

I do appreciate the thought, though. I have no doubt that I could keep my clientele happy for the rest of my career with the 60 or so quality mics I have now. And as Deedeeyeah pointed out, the real magic comes from the music and the players.

That said, I know that my vocal sounds got better when I got my Aurora Audio GTQC and TubeTech CL1B, my drum sounds got better when I got my API preamps, etc., not to mention all the sonic problems a large mic locker can address. So while gear isn't the end-all, it can make a substantial difference. I've been at this long enough to know that a new pair of high-end mics won't likely blow my mind, but every once in awhile one has to take a plunge (sometimes costly) to satisfy one's professional drive for perfection—and I see these freakin' Schoeps mics just about every single time I watch a classical recording video that sounds phenomenal.
Old 4 days ago
  #70
Lives for gear
 

Just to update, I'm now the proud owner of a matched pair of CMC65's. They'll get their first use in a couple of weeks at one of many strange COVID-19-related recording sessions I'll be doing this summer, this one of live instruments and a small choir, spread out all over a concert hall.

Maybe I imagined it, but when I picked one up out of the box, it sent a tingle up my arm.
Old 3 days ago
  #71
Gear Nut
Enjoy, Sean!! MK5 my most often-used caps.
📝 Reply
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
🖨️ Show Printable Version
✉️ Email this Page
🔍 Search thread
♾️ Similar Threads
🎙️ View mentioned gear
Forum Jump
Forum Jump