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led lights hum- how best to deal with it?
Old 17th October 2016
  #1
Gear Addict
 

led lights hum- how best to deal with it?

not sure if this is the right forum for this, but it seems like you guys might deal with this, so i'm giving it a shot.

here's my story: i'm trying to get live and compiled takes of performances and recordings in my home studio. mostly acoustic guitar, percussion and vocals (for now).

in order to get some video of the proceedings, i got an led light panel (Aputure Light Storm LS 1s), and hope to add an led fresnel at some point, in addition to a practical light here and there.

and now, the problem: i'm noticing the mics are picking up a hum from the lights, right around 9500k or so. i tried moving the light to a different power strip, then to a different outlet, and then finally powering it from the next room. neither made much of a difference at all. don't have an extension on hand right now to try to power it from further away.

i was able to eq it out with some severe chopping with a tiny q right around that frequency, but i was wondering if there was a better, and less destructive way to handle this. i need the lights- there isn't a way around that. and i can't really afford to replace my mics right now, either. i suppose the other obvious answer would be to run the lights off of battery power and see if that changes anything, but i don't have any of those yet, as they are expensive and the time limit isn't beneficial to me.

i did note that my dynamic vocal mic (sm7) picked up the hum, but when i switched over to my phantom powered condenser (an sm81) it didn't pick up any of that hum. those are my best sounding mics for my current needs, so i'm not sure what to do with this info just yet. none of my other mics require phantom power, so i can't fully confirm this discovery.

edit- should also note i'm already plugged into a battery of tripp lite and furman power strips with their various noise reduction and shielding and banks and such. it didn't make a difference which power strip the light was plugged into.

thanks fellas

Last edited by eor; 17th October 2016 at 10:55 AM..
Old 17th October 2016
  #2
Lives for gear
Lights have always produced spurious artefacts
LEDs are some of the quietest arrays
I presume you mean 9.5Khz,this is hardly hum and can be notched out , or is it dimmer buzz ?
Send a sample please
Old 17th October 2016
  #3
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolo 46 View Post
Lights have always produced spurious artefacts
LEDs are some of the quietest arrays
I presume you mean 9.5Khz,this is hardly hum and can be notched out , or is it dimmer buzz ?
Send a sample please
you are correct- i did mean 9.5khz. must have been thinking of color temperature there. and you may also be correct about the nomenclature- "buzz" may be more correct than "hum". it is a buzzy electric sound that i can notch out and cover up with other tracks. since i'm just doing vocals and acoustic guitars to start, i'm not losing much info at that frequency, but as i get into percussion, cymbals, and guitar harmonics/feedback, etc, i wonder if i should go about it differently.

given the small size of the room, a mic will always be within 5-10' of a light, for what that's worth. i can't say whether the dimmer is causing it or not- it didn't occur to me to play with the intensity or color temperature of the light to see if that makes a difference. one more thing to investigate.

i'll have to start some accounts and see if i can post something here, as i'm not set up for that, yet.
Old 17th October 2016
  #4
Can you power the lights from batteries?

Sometimes "inexpensive" or "cheap" LED lighting uses very inexpensive "SCR" type dimmers that would put off some noise in the audio. They could also be using switching type power supplies to change the AC into DC that could also be putting noise into your recordings. If you can bypass the AC to DC converter and power the lights off batteries it MAY take care of the problem.

Best of luck!
Old 17th October 2016
  #5
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
Can you power the lights from batteries?

Sometimes "inexpensive" or "cheap" LED lighting uses very inexpensive "SCR" type dimmers that would put off some noise in the audio. They could also be using switching type power supplies to change the AC into DC that could also be putting noise into your recordings. If you can bypass the AC to DC converter and power the lights off batteries it MAY take care of the problem.

Best of luck!
considering v mount batteries start at around $300 a pop (without the charger), and i won't even know if that helps until after i spend the cash, i'm hoping there is another solution out there. not to mention they run less than one hour per charge, meaning i'd have to work fast or swap between power sources in an annoying fashion (i'm already working the instruments, the mics, the cameras and the lights as is). i will mess with the dimmer to see what changes, though- maybe there is a clue there.
Old 17th October 2016
  #6
I looked up the lights you have on line. There are no perceived "problems" with them generating noise that I can find. The type of problem you are describing is usually from a bad switching type power supply or an over loaded switching power supply. Do you have access to another supply? One way to check is to take an AM radio, tune it off a station and hold it next to your lights and or power supply. If the radio makes a similar noise to what you are experiencing then I suggest you try another supply.

As to batteries...there are alternatives like a gel cell with an adapter and charger. Cost would be less than $50.00 and would give you some serious run time. The batteries spec'd are for mobility which, according to your post is not needed.

Best of luck!
Old 17th October 2016
  #7
Gear Addict
 

interesting! i messed with the dimmer that controls the light output as suggested. there is less but still audible buzz at its lower settings, and the buzz gets worse and worse as you raise the intensity. but strangely, after around 67-67% output, it disappears completely. it seems to be at its worse right around 50%.

now guess where i like to set my light?

so i guess now i can either investigate batteries or learn to use the light at floodlight settings. luckily, the nearest radio of any kind is in my car, several floors below. so that test isn't going to work, unless i can drive it up here. i would love to hear more about these gel batteries, if you have a suggestion to look up. failing that, i can probably rent something locally from one of the supply houses, if worse comes to worse. i'd rather throw that money toward a purchase, but what can you do? the lights are pretty stationary for now, but that will eventually change. this is the only one of these lights that i have at the moment, so i only have the one power supply it came with. it serves its lighting duties just fine, so i may be a stretch to call it faulty or malfunctioning.

to clarify things, i did make a recording that was thrillingly narrated by me. i'll try and post that somewhere, somehow.
Old 17th October 2016
  #8
Lives for gear
Posting files is easy ,drag and drop ,dimmers can be horrible offenders but they do need clean feeds
Run a clean supply (No conditioning) from another spur
Old 17th October 2016
  #9
Quote:
Originally Posted by eor View Post
interesting! i messed with the dimmer that controls the light output as suggested. there is less but still audible buzz at its lower settings, and the buzz gets worse and worse as you raise the intensity. but strangely, after around 67-67% output, it disappears completely. it seems to be at its worse right around 50%.

now guess where i like to set my light?

so i guess now i can either investigate batteries or learn to use the light at floodlight settings. luckily, the nearest radio of any kind is in my car, several floors below. so that test isn't going to work, unless i can drive it up here. i would love to hear more about these gel batteries, if you have a suggestion to look up. failing that, i can probably rent something locally from one of the supply houses, if worse comes to worse. i'd rather throw that money toward a purchase, but what can you do? the lights are pretty stationary for now, but that will eventually change. this is the only one of these lights that i have at the moment, so i only have the one power supply it came with. it serves its lighting duties just fine, so i may be a stretch to call it faulty or malfunctioning.

to clarify things, i did make a recording that was thrillingly narrated by me. i'll try and post that somewhere, somehow.
Sounds like an poorly designed SCR dimmer circuit to me. They always misbehave about 50% of their duty cycle. So you may have found your problem. I would contact the company and find out if this is a "general" problem with all their units or with your specific unit. Could just be some bad component in the dimmer circuit or a bad design. Only they can tell you for sure.

Gel batteries may or may not be a solution if it is the dimmer circuit that is misbehaving. I would call the company first. Gel batteries are available almost everywhere and are used in UPS power supplies and emergency lighting. Here is a link to on such battery on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/VMAXTANKS-V10...teries+for+UPS

Best of luck.
Old 17th October 2016
  #10
Gear Addict
 

ok, here's an mp3 i made that shows the buzz in its various states. i had to convert because the wav was too big but this really isn't a critical listening thing so i hope its ok. aside from a little plug in volume boost (and mp3 conversion), nothing was added or changed- peaks should be around -20db. just me messing with the lights and fumbling in the dark. weirdly, i think it was quieter at full blast that it was off.

special guest appearance from a trash truck

i also took a screen shot while it was open adobe sound booth with the spectral frequency display up. interesting, no?
Attached Thumbnails
led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-led-light-buzz-test.jpg  
Attached Files

led light buzz test.mp3 (4.32 MB, 1744 views)

Old 17th October 2016
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Bruce Watson's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
Sometimes "inexpensive" or "cheap" LED lighting uses very inexpensive "SCR" type dimmers that would put off some noise in the audio.
Yes. Crap dimmers are a bane if there ever was one. That's why man invented scrims.
Old 18th October 2016
  #12
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
how big of a Space are we talking about here ??? you say in your House .. how many rooms, 1 or more ??

Leave the Lights full up and put some Diffusion on the lights themselves - 216, Gridcloth, etc - like we do for any video shoot .. or use lower wattage LED's where needed and have supplemental lighting when you need more gas .. avoid the Dimmers if issues ..

cheers john
Old 18th October 2016
  #13
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
50% is typically the "worst case" for any kind of dimmer. That is where the power sine-wave is at the peak and produces the maximum glitch.

However, as already noted, the high frequency suggests that they are using a switch-mode power-supply (SMPS). And SMPS are notoriously noisy even when not dimming. As already suggested, you could use an AM radio to "probe" around and see where the 9.5Khz is being radiated. You may be able to add some shielding to reduce the radiated EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference).
Old 19th October 2016
  #14
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jwh1192 View Post
how big of a Space are we talking about here ??? you say in your House .. how many rooms, 1 or more ??

Leave the Lights full up and put some Diffusion on the lights themselves - 216, Gridcloth, etc - like we do for any video shoot .. or use lower wattage LED's where needed and have supplemental lighting when you need more gas .. avoid the Dimmers if issues
its a spare bedroom- maybe 11'x13' or so? so not a lot of room to eat up all that light power. i'm already using a softbox bounced off the (grey) ceiling and 45% was kind of a lot of light already. i may have to get fancy here, or at least rethink some things.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
50% is typically the "worst case" for any kind of dimmer. That is where the power sine-wave is at the peak and produces the maximum glitch.

However, as already noted, the high frequency suggests that they are using a switch-mode power-supply (SMPS). And SMPS are notoriously noisy even when not dimming. As already suggested, you could use an AM radio to "probe" around and see where the 9.5Khz is being radiated. You may be able to add some shielding to reduce the radiated EMI (ElectroMagnetic Interference).
this is my first time attempting to record with lights and my first "real" light, so this is all new to me. i guess i'll have to keep an eye out for a cheap radio. but this shielding thing could be interesting. can i just wrap the dimmer up in something? hopefully something cheap and easy?
Old 19th October 2016
  #15
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
Chances are the EMI is being radiated from the wiring and/or the LED array itself.

I would try getting a large "snap-around" ferrite choke and run the wire through it several times...

Old 19th October 2016
  #16
This it the cheapest AM radio I could find.

https://www.amazon.com/Kaito-KA200-P...words=am+radio

Best of luck!
Old 19th October 2016
  #17
Gear Guru
 
jwh1192's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by eor View Post
its a spare bedroom- maybe 11'x13' or so? so not a lot of room to eat up all that light power. i'm already using a softbox bounced off the (grey) ceiling and 45% was kind of a lot of light already. i may have to get fancy here, or at least rethink some things.


this is my first time attempting to record with lights and my first "real" light, so this is all new to me. i guess i'll have to keep an eye out for a cheap radio. but this shielding thing could be interesting. can i just wrap the dimmer up in something? hopefully something cheap and easy?
may i ask,what kind of camera you are using ?? practical light might be the best choice for you .. what i mean by that is just normal lighting - lamps, windows, and such .. give a natural look .. you would be amazed at what you can get with todays cameras ... this way you can use low wattage bulbs in regular lamps and not have to worry about dimmers .. just a thought ..
Old 19th October 2016
  #18
Lives for gear
 
lame pseudonym's Avatar
 

Not for nothin', but any time you're using a dimmer you're asking for trouble, and it was always thus.
You want less light get smaller light bulbs. Or a Variac. You can try a Variac.
Old 21st October 2016
  #19
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Chances are the EMI is being radiated from the wiring and/or the LED array itself.

I would try getting a large "snap-around" ferrite choke and run the wire through it several times...
never heard of these before, but now that i looked them up, i've seen them several times before. i guess that's why so many of my cables have those little lumps on them. does size matter with these? would a bigger one work better? can i use several smaller ones to the same effect? i found several on amazon in varying sizes but they all seem to be pretty small.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jwh1192 View Post
may i ask,what kind of camera you are using ?? practical light might be the best choice for you .. what i mean by that is just normal lighting - lamps, windows, and such .. give a natural look .. you would be amazed at what you can get with todays cameras ... this way you can use low wattage bulbs in regular lamps and not have to worry about dimmers .. just a thought ..
i had wanted to avoid relying entirely on practicals just so i can have more options and be vaguely "professional". i also shoot stills, and i obviously didn't have a buzzing problem there so i didn't notice until much later. so i'm already stuck with the thing, but i do expect to supplement it with practicals for the near future, at least.

my local cvs tends to have a great selection of outdated technology, so maybe i can pick up a cheap radio there. otherwise, i can add that to my amazon order, i guess.
Old 21st October 2016
  #20
Lives for gear
 
Richard Crowley's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by eor View Post
never heard of these before, but now that i looked them up, i've seen them several times before. i guess that's why so many of my cables have those little lumps on them.
Yes, they are added to the cables exactly for the purpose of reducing either the EMI coming out of the connector, or the EMI going into the connector.

Quote:
does size matter with these? would a bigger one work better? can i use several smaller ones to the same effect?
Yes, size (and ferrite composition) matter significantly. The lower the frequency you are trying to block, the larger the choke you need. And your 9.5KHz frequency is very low by EMI standards. It is possible that several smaller chokes in series might be effective, but not as much as a larger single choke.

Quote:
i found several on amazon in varying sizes but they all seem to be pretty small.
You might want to check out more specific electronic parts vendors like...
All Electronics - Ferrites
BG Micro - Ferrites
MPJA - Ferrite Filters and Chokes
Parts Express - Ferrites
Electronic Goldmine - Ferrite / Toroids
Alltronics - Ferrites, Cores & Toroids
Surplus Sales - Split Beads - 43 Material
Old 22nd October 2016
  #21
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
Yes, size (and ferrite composition) matter significantly. The lower the frequency you are trying to block, the larger the choke you need. And your 9.5KHz frequency is very low by EMI standards. It is possible that several smaller chokes in series might be effective, but not as much as a larger single choke.
i'll pour through that list and attempt to apply the principles you gave above. i'll report back once i have new findings.

now i wonder if these would work on the random buzzing i get from my guitar's pedal board and amp, as well... worth a shot, i guess.
Old 28th October 2016
  #22
Gear Addict
 

so i did something that for whatever reason hadn't occurred to me yet- while trying to decide which choke i needed, i figured i should attempt to measure the cable. and imagine my surprise to see a familiar cylindrical lump on the power cable, in between the light's control and the giant line lump. its about 3" all the way around. and apparently, it sucks at it's job.

have a few more questions-

i'm guessing these need to fit flush onto the cable, right? so i'd have to buy one that matched the diameter of my cable, i assume.
how much is enough? are they rated for certain frequencies? how do i know which is right for me? do i just get the biggest one i can find and clip it on?
would one on either side of the line lump make a difference, or should they all be grouped together?

sorry for the dumb questions, but this really isn't my thing at all.
Old 27th November 2016
  #23
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
ok, i'm back. i ordered a bunch of split beads from that site, in the 3/8" and 1/2" sizes. they weren't going answer any of my questions about the suitability of the beads for my needs, so i got sick of waiting and just ordered them. their website and ordering process is fairly archaic, but they moved pretty quickly once they had my money. shipping was fairly prompt.

so i finally get around to slapping them on, and.... nothing. not a single bit of difference. not in the pitch or volume of the buzzing. i tried two of the 1/2" and five of the 3/8" on either side of the line lump for the light. nothing at all. massive, massive disappointment. since they are here, i'll try them on my pedal boards and power strips and stuff just because, but otherwise, i just hope i can return these.

back at square one, then. what now?
Old 27th November 2016
  #24
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Richard Crowley's Avatar
Well, "slapping them on" is not necessarily a very effective way of dealing with the problem. Unfortunately you have a rather complex and sticky problem and it will take more than "slapping them on" to research and resolve the problem.

If you want our help with this, can you provide a few necessary pieces of evidence?
1) Link to the details of your noisy LED lamp. Preferable something with pictures front, back and sides, including cables, external supply box, etc.
2) Sample recording demonstrating the recorded noise. Something with normal recorded vocal (or instrument) along with the noise so we can hear the ratio, etc. And details of how you have the mic positioned relative to the lamp. Photo of the setup would help also.
3) Photos of HOW you applied the ferrite chokes to the lamp cable.
Old 27th November 2016
  #25
I still think it has something to do with the power supply. Have you tried switching to a different supply? In the "good old days" wall warts had a hefty transformer in them with some type of rectifier and a smoothing cap. Then manufacture figured out that it would be cheaper to forgo the transformer and substitute a small circuit card to "do the same thing". This means that you are taking AC level voltage and converting it to run your lights or whatever without the benefits of a transformer to knock down the voltages. They also started using switching type supplies which can be very high in EMI if not properly designed or implemented. FWIW
Old 27th November 2016
  #26
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Crowley View Post
1) Link to the details of your noisy LED lamp. Preferable something with pictures front, back and sides, including cables, external supply box, etc.
2) Sample recording demonstrating the recorded noise. Something with normal recorded vocal (or instrument) along with the noise so we can hear the ratio, etc. And details of how you have the mic positioned relative to the lamp. Photo of the setup would help also.
3) Photos of HOW you applied the ferrite chokes to the lamp cable.

1- http://www.aputure.com/en/LS-1-Studio.html

here's a link to the product, with some basic photos, and a link to the fairly useless manual, which provides these specs for the power: 8a operation current, dc 15v power supply, 120w power. i can provide an supplemental photos you may need of the i/o and such. its a chinese company, so there isn't much useful info available from them. i did finally find a us distributor email, so i'll try that, too. they were amazon only until recently.

2. the clip and photo in post #10 still works, but its just me narrating and messing with the dial on the dimmer, if that helps. i can try to make an acoustic guitar track if need be.

the positioning of the lamp didn't seem to affect anything whether it was right next to the mic, or on the other side of the room. i tried plugging it in from a different room but it was still the same. i guess i could move the whole thing to a different room altogether to see what, if anything changes, in the hopes of learning something but that obviously isn't much of a solution. the room is pretty small and the lights need to be there.

3. i got the clip on ferrite chokes in plastic housing in two sizes. they simply snap on around the cable. there's only one way to do it. i don't know how the circumference of the cable vs the opening of the choke changes things (if at all), because the vendor ignored my question. :/ they make contact with the cable but the fit is a bit loose- you can slide them around. they aren't flush or wrapped around/part of the cable like an oem one would be. the standard cable already has one, for what its worth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas W. Bethe View Post
I still think it has something to do with the power supply. Have you tried switching to a different supply? In the "good old days" wall warts had a hefty transformer in them with some type of rectifier and a smoothing cap. Then manufacture figured out that it would be cheaper to forgo the transformer and substitute a small circuit card to "do the same thing". This means that you are taking AC level voltage and converting it to run your lights or whatever without the benefits of a transformer to knock down the voltages. They also started using switching type supplies which can be very high in EMI if not properly designed or implemented. FWIW
its the only one that i have, so i haven't tried a different supply, or a battery, for that matter. the chokes seemed like a simpler and cheaper solution. but maybe not. the provided supply seems to be oem and it functions perfectly as a light. which was the intention, obviously. i may have to check some more cinematography oriented sources and see if anyone else has had this issue and how they've dealt with it. maybe i'm just lucky.

as always, much obliged for the help, fellas. i'll get started on my homework and report back when i have something new.
Old 27th November 2016
  #27
Deleted User
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by eor View Post
ok, i'm back. i ordered a bunch of split beads from that site, in the 3/8" and 1/2" sizes. they weren't going answer any of my questions about the suitability of the beads for my needs, so i got sick of waiting and just ordered them. their website and ordering process is fairly archaic, but they moved pretty quickly once they had my money. shipping was fairly prompt.

so i finally get around to slapping them on, and.... nothing. not a single bit of difference. not in the pitch or volume of the buzzing. i tried two of the 1/2" and five of the 3/8" on either side of the line lump for the light. nothing at all. massive, massive disappointment. since they are here, i'll try them on my pedal boards and power strips and stuff just because, but otherwise, i just hope i can return these.

back at square one, then. what now?
Get a couple Shielded CAT5 Cable with Shielded RJ45 Connector... connect those to your Controller DMX in/outs, and on the other end put some tape over the pins just to isolate them and wrap/cover foil around those ends use a rubber band to make tight, this is to terminate those two in/outs on the controller, might use a couple of those bead on the CAT5. Also take an Ohm meter and check the ground prong on the power cord to the shield on the controller connector , if no continuity, check just the power cord grounds end to end, I seen bad ones. You might try wrapping the power supply with foil (if its not a vented PS) and put the foil ends of the CAT5 with/against that foil wrapped PS. If that works, you may need to make a an shielded inclosure for the PS if it seems to get hot being wrapped.Trying to create a EMI shield. Hope your following me?
Attached Thumbnails
led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-controller.jpg   led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-dmx.jpg   led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-ps.jpg  

Last edited by Deleted User; 27th November 2016 at 04:19 PM.. Reason: typo
Old 27th November 2016
  #28
Deleted User
Guest
Quote:
Originally Posted by eor View Post
1- http://www.aputure.com/en/LS-1-Studio.html

here's a link to the product, with some basic photos, and a link to the fairly useless manual, which provides these specs for the power: 8a operation current, dc 15v power supply, 120w power. i can provide an supplemental photos you may need of the i/o and such. its a chinese company, so there isn't much useful info available from them. i did finally find a us distributor email, so i'll try that, too. they were amazon only until recently.

2. the clip and photo in post #10 still works, but its just me narrating and messing with the dial on the dimmer, if that helps. i can try to make an acoustic guitar track if need be.

the positioning of the lamp didn't seem to affect anything whether it was right next to the mic, or on the other side of the room. i tried plugging it in from a different room but it was still the same. i guess i could move the whole thing to a different room altogether to see what, if anything changes, in the hopes of learning something but that obviously isn't much of a solution. the room is pretty small and the lights need to be there.

3. i got the clip on ferrite chokes in plastic housing in two sizes. they simply snap on around the cable. there's only one way to do it. i don't know how the circumference of the cable vs the opening of the choke changes things (if at all), because the vendor ignored my question. :/ they make contact with the cable but the fit is a bit loose- you can slide them around. they aren't flush or wrapped around/part of the cable like an oem one would be. the standard cable already has one, for what its worth.



its the only one that i have, so i haven't tried a different supply, or a battery, for that matter. the chokes seemed like a simpler and cheaper solution. but maybe not. the provided supply seems to be oem and it functions perfectly as a light. which was the intention, obviously. i may have to check some more cinematography oriented sources and see if anyone else has had this issue and how they've dealt with it. maybe i'm just lucky.

as always, much obliged for the help, fellas. i'll get started on my homework and report back when i have something new.
You Say "i got the clip on ferrite chokes in plastic housing in two sizes. they simply snap on around the cable. there's only one way to do it. i don't know how the circumference of the cable vs the opening of the choke changes things (if at all), because the vendor ignored my question. :/ they make contact with the cable but the fit is a bit loose- you can slide them around. they aren't flush or wrapped around/part of the cable like an oem one would be. the standard cable already has one, for what its worth."

You didn't/couldn't make a loop through the chokes? if not they're not going to work, Period,.
Old 27th November 2016
  #29
Deleted User
Guest
You should have something like this going on.
Attached Thumbnails
led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-ferrite-chokes-_.jpg  
Old 27th November 2016
  #30
Gear Addict
 

ok, here's a verrrry rough acoustic guitar/vocal clip featuring two mics and the buzz. the levels are a little hot to make the point come across, but no other plugins or processing was done. it doesn't sound all that great but it was 7am i let it ring out so you can hear the buzz both on its own and in context. i had to squish it into an mp3 to be able to post it, so hopefully that doesn't defeat the purpose of it.

a couple of photos- one of the back of the power supply with the specs listed, and one of the supply with the chokes installed. you can see the smaller white ones leading to the light, and the larger black ones heading toward the power strip.

perhaps worth noting is that there is just under 10' of cable from the light to the power strip, including the line lump. so i couldn't wrap the cord around the chokes as in the photo way up the thread if i wanted to. is there a clever way around that? they are too short. and they do slide on the cable like an abacus, but they are on there. the chokes aren't wide enough to accommodate more than one pass, anyhow.

i'll check out the cat 5 cables, thanks.
Attached Thumbnails
led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-lightstorm-power-supply.jpg   led lights hum- how best to deal with it?-chokes-supply.jpg  
Attached Files

gtr-vox buzz test.mp3 (2.23 MB, 1075 views)

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