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Creating CDs of long format live concerts
Old 29th January 2007
  #1
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Matt Pneumatic's Avatar
 

Talking Creating CDs of long format live concerts

I was wondering how everyone creates their CDs from their audio worstations for selling after a concert or for archival purposes. For example, you hear all these situations where remote truck companies are able to create CDs for concertgoers for sale immediately after a performance. I can't just record the performances directly to a CD-R because I do need to create clean starts at the beginning and end of the CDs.

I ask this because I'm looking to streamline my workflow on how I'm archiving my performances to CD from my audio workstation. Generally speaking I will have 4/5 performances per week of about 4 hours in length of each performance. There are no pauses or breaks in the recording because it is a broadcast situation and the machine has to be running continuously. Obviously I can't sit and bounce these files in real time after the fact. My goal would hopefully be to get this archival process down to 2-3 hours per 4-5 hour concert recording.

Also, is there any CD burning software out there that will recognize regions in an audio file? Or is there a better audio workstation application similar to that of Sadie which allows you to create PQ indexes and will allow you to burn CDs directly from within the editing application?

Thank you,
Matt
Old 29th January 2007
  #2
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Matt Pneumatic's Avatar
 

One thing I used to do was create indexes within files in Pro Tools and when I imported the SDII audio files in Roxio Jam, Jam would recognize the 'text markers' or 'numeric markers'. Therefore all the PQ codes would be created automatically for me. The problem is that is seems as if Toast 8 doesn't have this feature.
Old 29th January 2007
  #3
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chadly's Avatar
 

Matt:

I've been using Wavelab for delivery for my stereo work. PT files -> Wavelab audiomontage, a bit of limiting if it's going out right then. I can edit/burn a show in about 15 minutes in a pinch.

How are things? It's been quite awhile since we've talked!

Chad
Old 29th January 2007
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Stereo to Masterlink

We use a Masterlink (or two) to create a "live" two track mix directly at the time of the performance. I use the Cranesong spider and the AES out is sent to one Masterlink and the SPDIF out to another. Every 60-70 minutes we switch the master recorder and as the next peformance is being recorded, we are able to trim, fade-in etc the recording and have a CD ready.

The direct channel AES outs and/or the direct outs are sent to a Genex to keep a "backup" of the tracks in case the live two track mix does not work out.

Hope this helps,

Baithak
Old 29th January 2007
  #5
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I use Samplitude, it seems made for the kind of application you are talking about.

The process is very simple:
- import the wave files (or whatever you have). No limit on number of tracks. Markers are recognized. Or if you preferr it, record directly with the program.
- divide at songs. This is done "non-destructive" and takes no time
- add fade-ins and fade outs, still non-desctructive, takes no time. Adjust position and length to fit music, listen til you are satisfied (still no bouncing)

When done with the dividing process, and any volume mixing you care to do.
- use the command "Set CD markers at object boundaries" (no time again). Add or remove markers as necessary (often not needed)
- burn CD. Done inside the program, about 10 minutes.

NO bouncing at all (unless you want to of course).

There is a "little" brother called Magix Music Studio that has all the functions above. It is limited to 8 tracks and has less elaborate plugins and also lacks some other features but will get the job above done. Larger brother is Sequioa which has additional functions.

I would probably split the digital signals (Adat) and run to two recorders. One would be the computer, possibly a laptop, and the other a more reliable backup, say a dedicated hard-disc recorder. If no snags occurs all need is on the computer and you could simply clear the hard-disk recorder once the CD is made.

In a de-luxe situation, you could edit the CD-s at the same time as the "show" is running. Samplitude can actually edit at the same time as it records, the program handles it but I have always been too scared doing that. One way would be to have two PC-s and a network data drive. One records and the other is used to edit. Or you could run the two machines alternatively, while one is recording the other is used to edit and at a good place you switch. (this is all extra). Let the recording run for an hour or two and start editing the first discs while recording continues on the other machine. Once done with those, start them mass-copying (perhaps a dedicated machine for that) and go on with editing extra material. First three hours (of the four) could possibly be ready to distribute before the audience leaves and the last within an hour or so.

Gunnar
Old 29th January 2007
  #6
Lives for gear
 

After I record a concert I go through it and place cue markers before each song. It's really a very quick process, especially if I know the songs. Look at your waveform; you'll be able to see it before you hear it usually. It usually takes me about 20-30 minutes to split a 2 hour show. I think Nero has a feature that will import cue splits. I don't have Nero so I select from cue x to cue y, save selection as, then go to the next. If you do this then turn on your cursor snapping.
Old 29th January 2007
  #7
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Adebar's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt
Obviously I can't sit and bounce these files in real time after the fact. My goal would hopefully be to get this archival process down to 2-3 hours per 4-5 hour concert recording.

Also, is there any CD burning software out there that will recognize regions in an audio file? Or is there a better audio workstation application similar to that of Sadie which allows you to create PQ indexes and will allow you to burn CDs directly from within the editing application?

Thank you,
Matt
All you are looking for can be done with Soundblade from Sonic Studio.
No bouncing, very fast PQ editing and burning directly. You can even create a DDP in the background at the same time.

http://sonicstudio.com
Old 30th January 2007
  #8
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Karl Jackson's Avatar
 

Background recording

You mention SADiE, so you may already be aware that with SADiE you are able to record in the background while you edit the material in the foreground. I use this quite a lot, and find it useful for situations that require quick turnaround. Simply start recording, drag the (still recording) clip to the EDL, and start editing. When you get to the end of the clip in the EDL, drag the right hand edge of the clip to the right to reveal material recorded since you dropped the clip in the EDL. When recording a concert this way, the CD can be done and burning within minutes of the end of the show, and to multiple CD burners if you have that capacity.

Also - you mention that this is for archival. That being the case, would a hard drive based archival scenario work just as well (think metadata, redundant copies, automated backups, etc...)?

Best,

Karl Jackson
Old 2nd February 2007
  #9
Gear Nut
 
Matt Pneumatic's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Karl Jackson View Post
You mention SADiE, so you may already be aware that with SADiE you are able to record in the background while you edit the material in the foreground. I use this quite a lot, and find it useful for situations that require quick turnaround. Simply start recording, drag the (still recording) clip to the EDL, and start editing. When you get to the end of the clip in the EDL, drag the right hand edge of the clip to the right to reveal material recorded since you dropped the clip in the EDL. When recording a concert this way, the CD can be done and burning within minutes of the end of the show, and to multiple CD burners if you have that capacity.

Also - you mention that this is for archival. That being the case, would a hard drive based archival scenario work just as well (think metadata, redundant copies, automated backups, etc...)?

Best,

Karl Jackson

Thanks karl. This is helpful. Unfortunately I think that we are going to have to switch our entire system over to Pro Tools for the sake of standardizing a system that would be fimiliar to new hires in the future. There are aspects of Sadie that I do enjoy though.

As far as the archival goes, we are archiving the operas on CD due to cost of the actual media combined with backup costs. Ideally we'd love to just keep it all on a network for ease of accessability, but that's going to take quite a bit of time to transfer all the CDs to a server. Probably a summer project.
Old 2nd February 2007
  #10
Gear Nut
 
Matt Pneumatic's Avatar
 

Meta data search applications???

Also, does anyone out there know of any search applications that could tie into searching the artist, title, composer, notes, etc. of a library of WAV files?

-matt
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