The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Tags: ,

Lifespan of CDR's Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 8th September 2011
  #1
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Talking Lifespan of CDR's

I'm not sure of whether this is the best forum to be posting this in, however, as it is the forum I most regularly frequent and something others here do get involved with I thought it was probably relevent.

A good friend of mine came around yesterday. He is retired, but used to record a lot of local orchestra's and alike over the last 40 years. He has been archiving his old recordings and made a 20-30 disc set of the local youth orchestra's which he sold to ex-members. This he did about 3-5 years ago. He has just been contacted by one of the players that bought a set to tell him that 4-5 of the disc's no longer played and she was looking for replacements.

Being that many people still speculate on the lifespan of CDR's and this "client" was obviously not someone likely to be playing them on a daily basis, I felt it gave a good indication of a "real world" scenario.

My friend who is a pensioner living on a basic English pension, is in the difficult situation of having to replace these discs at his own cost and time. I accept that this is not a lot in his case, (he sold about 10-15 complete sets ever), however, it does show the potential liability those offering CDR duplication could be opening themselves up to.


Regards


Roland
Old 8th September 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 

There are big differences in the quality of CD-R:s, there are also considerably more expensive blanks which should last for 100 years or so. Normal disks can not be guaranteed for more than 10 years or so. If one is selling audio CD-R disks he should consider this also.

There are also special audio CD-R disks meant for slow burning speeds and longer life.
Old 8th September 2011
  #3
I have cdrs from 1996 that still work. I don't use them often but they all work. These are burned at like 2x or 4x cause thats the fastest they had at that time. lol I payed $400 for my ricoh cd burner and that was at my employee discount and an open box item discount at that. It was at least $600 for a 2x burner. It had that plastic tray caddy you put the disc in first.

I was making akai library sample cds using arcane sample transferring software to go from the sampler via scsi to a hard drive, hard drive scsi to computer and finally computer scsi to burner. What a mission. That's 16 years ago at this point and probably only within a year or so of cdrs becoming available.
Old 8th September 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
 
The Listener's Avatar
My earliest CD-Rs are from the end of millenia - ca.98/99, I still remember what a revelation it was when we started burning our own CD-R, while just a few years ago the CD-R recorders used to cost a fortune and were only in the domain of bigger studios and broadcasting houses. Anyway - all those CD-Rs still work. They were burned at 1x and 2x speed.

10 year life-span estimation obviously works, I have to re-copy them slowly...

I guess for only 3-5 years of those CD-Rs there must be something else wrong - not the age problem.

And anyway - you guarantee that it will work when you hand it out... not to last through the years... and all the physical abuse CDs get... scratches, temperature, etc. Why would one feel responsible to replace something he handed out 5 years ago and it worked then - hell, you mostly don't get such a warranty even for cars...
Old 8th September 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petrus View Post
There are big differences in the quality of CD-R:s, there are also considerably more expensive blanks which should last for 100 years or so. Normal disks can not be guaranteed for more than 10 years or so. If one is selling audio CD-R disks he should consider this also.

There are also special audio CD-R disks meant for slow burning speeds and longer life.
Whilst I wouldn't dispute that not all discs are made equal, on the whole, I'm afraid that I would disagree with this.

I've been burning CDR's since the early days. I had one of the very original Marantz CDR-1's back when they were first released. Disc's cost £50.00 each, were a dark green colour and had a failure rate of around 10-20%.

What I would say about these discs, was that as time went on, failure rate dropped significantly and a good number of years later they still played, much, I suspect, due to the darker coating holding up longer.

It became desirable for discs to have a lighter coating (as they looked more like CD's) and I believe that there became certain health and safety issues about the toxicity of the chemicals used in the manufacture process of early discs.

We need to differentiate between the quality of discs in terms of block error rates in relationship to different manufacturers, burners and burn speeds. On the Mastering Web Board, several well respected mastering engineers undertook tests of differing disc's, and the results obtained by burning at slower (one to one, etc) speeds. The results appeared to be mixed and surprisingly higher burn speeds at times produced lower error counts. It was hypothesized that the discs were optimized for burring at higher than one to one speeds to reflect the higher speeds of most CDR drives. Moreover I would suggest that the quality of the burn isn't really the issue as regards lifespan. Potentially you could have a disc with quite high error counts that because the dye remained stable for longer would play for many years, where as a disc that had incredibly low errors if the dye became unstable or "aged" due to exposure to the players laser or even worse, subject to sunlight, could fail in a very short time.

In my experience, I have found that the "lighter" coated CDR's do not seem to be holding up as well as some of the older, original CDR's. I don't think that we should be surprised by this, a lighter coating only has to fade a little to become unreadable.

I do understand that there are possible manufacturers who may make claims of 100 years lifespan of CDR's, I think these claims are difficult if not impossible to substantiate. Again this has been recently debated on the Mastering Web Board.

My own take on it, whatever the manufacturers may claim, many of these discs even different brands, originate from the same factories, many using the same proprietary technology. The general understanding that discs probably have a life expectancy of around ten years, doesn't preclude someone having one that lasts 10- 15 years or maybe longer, it also doesn't mean that others may last significantly shorter.

The customer who complained to my friend, had 6 discs of which 2 that originally worked, stopped working. Other disc's continued to work. I can't call these discs faulty as they did originally work, short of being seriously scratched (this doesn't appear to be the case) the next best culprit would be the dye coating breaking down.

My point is that as a medium to long term storage solution CDR's should be viewed as "dubious". I also think that those duplicating for clients as a retail solution are selling clients a product that is ultimately "not fit for it's purpose".

I've had CD's replicated for clients for many years, and had the opportunity to get into CDR duplication a good number of years ago. I could have made a lot of money, however, I couldn't hand on heart back up the product as I've been aware of the shortcomings.
Old 8th September 2011
  #6
Lives for gear
 

Hello Roland-
I used high quality discs, and had a failure rate of 0% when the discs were recorded! Over thousands of discs, I had only one disc returned, and only one failed for me when recording. That's an almost impossible record. This means to me that when they were made, they were darned good.

However, within a few years, maybe 5 or 6, I noticed some of my own discs beginning to fail. As someone else mentioned, manufacturers seemed to create thinner discs and coatings as time went on since the beginning of the CDR era. The coatings of many discs seemed to fail-some of the failed discs had become almost transparent! And I was a bit concerned that new discs being manufactured were relatively transparent as well. One can certainly see through them, although in a limited way. I add that the discs were well stored, out of light and in good temperature and humidity conditions.

A very long time ago, I advised clients to either create new discs of their material, or store the material on hard drives.

I also had told them the same thing about DATs several years earlier. I'm sure that advice was never followed, and I'd be surprised if the advice about the discs were followed either.

It was and is a temporary medium. At the beginning of the "era," no one had a real clue about longevity, despite the claims. This impression is not helped my ridiculous life claims made on the containers in office supply stores that consumers see. Nor is it helped by claims made on discs aimed toward professionals.

I don't think refunding discs that have gone bad is a practice that is consistent with retail or commercial standards, and seems inappropriate as well for the medium. Very few products have unlimited lifetime guarantees. Would a retail store replace a defective CD 4 or more years after purchase? How about a year after purchase?

Of course, the odd exception can always be made. And some of the discs can probably be read on various computers, or more likely, CDR recorders you might have around. You could try to help out, but I would hesitate about getting in too far, or establishing a precedent.

In fact, I've wondered if there is a market for rescuing failing CDR's!

Perhaps we should go back to LP's.
Old 8th September 2011
  #7
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Hi JEGG,

That's really the point I'm making. Obviously the failure rates I was talking about were in the burning process, with early discs (we are talking about 1988!) I, like you, can't remember the last time a disc failed on me whilst burning.

I can recount a client I had for whom we used to press the CD's for her label. the label had about 100 releases on, most of which we had pressed. As CD sales dropped, initial order quantities dropped from around 1,000 to 500. Eventually the client asked if we could do less than 500, I pointed out the fact that manufacturing plant's were not interested in lower quantities as much of the cost even for 500, was involved in the preparation for production (i.e. glass mastering, producing the press master, artwork plates, imposition, etc.) The client then told me they had been approached by a company offering to do limited run's (100-300) using CDR's and digital print. I told my client that I couldn't offer the same service as I knew the limitations, and I couldn't back them up as I knew the disc's had a limited life span and were unsuitable for retailing.

Now bearing in mind that this was a classical label, prior to this I had produced pressed CD's for them (these should given reasonable treatment last almost a lifetime).

The client wasn't making much money, they were getting older and their avarice coloured there judgment. They eventually did go with the CDR duplication. In time they will get failures, and people will complain.

I feel sorry for people buying the CD's at £10-12 each expecting a quality product that should last, at that price that is what they are paying for. Whilst they may look like (to your average man in the street) a "proper" CD, the likes of which they would expect to buy in any high street store, they are instead getting some "cruddy" CDR's with digital printed inserts.

This now goes back a few years ago and my ex client will now be close to 70, I doubt that the label will continue to exist in the next few years so customers will have little chance of recourse.
Old 8th September 2011
  #8
Lives for gear
 
hbphotoav's Avatar
 

I have a slew of CDR-Ms recorded in the late-90s (typically on TDK and Maxell media) as well as the bulk CD-Rs I've used since acquiring a TASCAM recorder in 2005. They are largely RiData and Taiyo-Yuden white inkjet printable. I've had very few failures at burn stage, and have not had any (of, admittedly, few) "bulk" duplicates (most of the bulk media I distribute are DVD-Rs... same suppliers, same results). I wonder if the white coating on the inkjet media has any ameliorating influence on longevity.

Ah, well. When I deliver anything on CD/DVD (mostly live events), I usually include at least two in the initial pricing, and I try always to make it a point to immediately store the duplicate away in a safe deposit box, or other similarly dark, climate-controlled environment... and then, as "new" digital storage media is brought to market, to transfer it to the new format.

I fear for the images, movies and music of my children, and theirs. My collection of over 1,000 LPs and about the same of commercially produced music CDs still brings me satisfaction, now nearly 50 years past the first exemplars... a Chicago Transit Authority LP (1968) is the first I remember purchasing, and I have a dozen or so of my Dad's, bought in the '50s. We're at 30 years from the first commercial CD releases, and my Erich Künzel/Cinci Orch "Star Wars" and Phil Collins "No Jacket Required" still play fine. But, I never traveled with them on the visor of the car, and, having been well trained in the Correct and Proper Handling of LPs, they were never otherwise abused.

Time, as they say, will tell. I guess when RAM storage gets to the sub-atomic level, it won't matter anymore, anyway (The Singularity Is Near - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). The Cloud, run amok.

HB
Old 8th September 2011
  #9
Mitsu gold discs are "rated" at 200 years, but I doubt it. I still use them as none have failed... yet.
Old 8th September 2011
  #10
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Mitsu gold discs are "rated" at 200 years, but I doubt it. I still use them as none have failed... yet.
I would love to know how those are in a couple hundred years, but, alas, I won't be here any more (weeping away......)

And neither will you, which may be a good thing if your clients are expecting them to be "golden" in a couple of centuries. (I mean this in jest, seasoned with a grain of truth.)
Old 8th September 2011
  #11
Lives for gear
 

Hi again, Roland:

A few thoughts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland View Post
prior to this I had produced pressed CD's for them (these should given reasonable treatment last almost a lifetime).
We should be careful with that one-the one about the life of "conventionally" made CD's.

1. We don't know. You know they haven't been around *that* long. LP's and *those* kinds of platters have been around a lot longer, which is why we are able to judge them.

2. What will happen to CD players? In the not too distant future, there may be fewer CD players/readers than turntables! No kidding. Which will render the whole issue moot. It's clear where Tony Faulkner thinks things are going. Discs are over. Wow. (Remember when that "you know who" computer manufacturer had the gaul to remove floppy drives from its computers. And the audacity of the same computer maker who is now removing disc readers/writers.......? Hmmm.) How much longer will the lifetime of CD's be relevant to the general population?

3. What is a defect, what is damage, and what are the implications in thinking about the lifetime of a disc?

I am amused that when people damage vinyl, they are perfectly capable of calling it damage, accepting that they or someone else did it, and have no second thoughts about it.

Curiously, CD's are assumed to be "magic glass." When someone digs deep scratches into that, or does other damage, that is viewed as "defective" because it didn't resist it. Everyday, I see many CD's and CDR's left on dashboards in very hot sun! Would someone do this with an LP?

If I scratch or melt an LP, I did it. If I scratch or melt or dunk a CD/R, it's the disc's fault.

With this sort of thing, CDR's are even more prone to damage by friction, water, heat, and sun.

Finally, my point: This sort of damage leaves the disc inoperative-or mostly so. So, should disc "lifetime" include the damage likely experienced that will put the disc out of order? As opposed to the damaged LP, which experiences damage in "shades of gray (grey)?"

...............................

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland View Post
I feel sorry for people buying the CD's at £10-12 each expecting a quality product that should last, at that price that is what they are paying for.

Way off topic, but you guys across the pond are getting serious money for CDR's!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland View Post
Whilst they may look like (to your average man in the street) a "proper" CD, the likes of which they would expect to buy in any high street store, they are instead getting some "cruddy" CDR's with digital printed inserts.
Interestingly, I have been really surprised on a few occasions when I've purchased a "real" CD on a established label in a retail "record" store only to discover it was a CDR! Nothing cruddy about it, everything was first rate. But a CDR? (And no, it was not bootleg.) Somehow, those guys seem to access even better looking (cosmetically) discs than we have available-you have to look very hard to find that it's a CDR. In several cases, I noticed it only days later!

Any ideas? What will I do with my wonderfully made and fully featured, fully interfaced (understatement!) 1st generation HHB recorder? It hasn't been exercised in a long while.
Old 8th September 2011
  #12
Lives for gear
 
hbphotoav's Avatar
 

As soon as I was "learned" about such things enough to notice, I began (in about 1972) transferring my new LPs, whether "standard" or "audiophile", to compact cassette. The main reason was that, as an itinerant photographer of church directories in Texas, I spent a lot more time over those years in a car than I did in front of my Sansui AU-999, Pioneer PL-12D and stacked Altec 891As. The secondary reason was that, even with the best of care, the "quality" of sound depreciated, however slightly, with every playback of an LP. Thus, I do have a couple hundred mid-'70s to late '80s LPs with maybe two or three spins. "Pristine" would describe them well.

CDs were a better deal, what with error correction that would cover surface scratches that would have been plainly obvious on any LP, and with a form factor that Sony immediately capitalized upon with CD Walkman and a cassette adapter. In-dash players (my first was in a '97 BMW I bought in '04... I don't buy new cars) made it all the more better... and the iPod was a true user's delight. Between AIFs (my "room tuning" selections, and most of the classical repertoire) and Apple Lossless, I don't need no steeenking MP3s to have 41.5 days of music at my fingertips... and, now, my new CDs (yes... I still order them from Amazon, now that Tower and Borders have gone the way of the dinosaur) never have to leave the ManCave. Treasures for the (indeterminate) future.

I guess my take is this: I have transferred formats in order to preserve the integrity of the licensed copies of music I buy, or the music I created (thank you TEAC, for the 3340!), for decades. I now have to do the same for the events I track for clients, and their final mixes and (at this point) CDs. I think I've done my due diligence (and satisfied my ethical inclinations regarding the contract) if I deliver a dupe set, made to the best of my technological ability on quality media, and strongly suggest that one be filed, dark and comfortably, and the other be uploaded to the client's current state-of-the-art digital storage media, and the CD be put away. I file my file copy of the job, dark and comfortable, and keep the session around on a hard drive as long as I can. If I can sell the client on a "tape" fee (i.e., bill for a new raw drive for the session), I will either deliver that with the suggestion of bank box storage with an annual spin-up, or keep it in my stacks, doing the same.

Seems to work OK for me. But, then, I'm far from a high-output provider, with my 10 or 12 projects a year.

HB
Old 9th September 2011
  #13
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JEGG View Post
Interestingly, I have been really surprised on a few occasions when I've purchased a "real" CD on a established label in a retail "record" store only to discover it was a CDR!
Did it have the Compact Disk logo on it? If it did not, you were not buying a CD. If it did, the company is lying as a CD-R can never be Red Book, and only BR disks can carry the CD logo.
Old 9th September 2011
  #14
Lives for gear
 
The Listener's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland View Post
Obviously the failure rates I was talking about were in the burning process, with early discs (we are talking about 1988!) I, like you, can't remember the last time a disc failed on me whilst burning.
Are you sure it was 1988? Wasn't the CD-R introduced in 1991 - so says Phillips' official history, but you could be one of the beta testers, but wow... I hardly even knew what a regular CD is in 1988. To burn one myself was still science fiction.
Old 9th September 2011
  #15
Lives for gear
 
d_fu's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Listener View Post
Are you sure it was 1988?
Make it 1998 and it makes sense heh
Old 11th September 2011
  #16
Lives for gear
 

I have quite a few CDs (not CDrs) that stopped working after 15 years. They are stored properly, as I copy them and listen to the copies. Even so, the silver seemed to perish, and that is that. So I do not see that much difference in practice between CDs and CDRs
Old 11th September 2011
  #17
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by faramita View Post
I have quite a few CDs (not CDrs) that stopped working after 15 years. They are stored properly, as I copy them and listen to the copies. Even so, the silver seemed to perish, and that is that. So I do not see that much difference in practice between CDs and CDRs
There was a well documented problem with CD's manufactured by Dupont optical a few years ago. They used a silver coating rather than aluminum and it ended up tarnishing which caused the CD's to stop playing.

By consequence, I have a large collection of CD's (over 1,000) many dating back to the 80's, and with the exception of one disc that was manufactured by Dupont which has the silver tarnish problem, they all still play. They have all been well treated in that they have been stored in their cases, but I have seen no reason to suspect that they will not continue to play for a good number of years yet.

CDR's, by consequence, have a totally different construction. They have an oscillating groove, that is used by the recorder to lay out the burn, however, this makes them more difficult to track when being read by a drive/CD player. You can run into problems when playing them with Technics or Panasonic drives as they use linear tracking as against the radial tracking that Phillips style drives do. They also record the data by burning away a dye coating, this appears to be the major problem in that these dye's break down over time.
Old 12th September 2011
  #18
Lives for gear
 

A few years ago I ripped all my CDs, some going back to 1986. Zero problems.

I have had one CD burner since 2003.

I have had different brand CDRs during that time.

The ones that failed were Sony.

I can also tell you to stay away from Memorex DVD-DLs.
Old 13th September 2011
  #19
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roland View Post
There was a well documented problem with CD's manufactured by Dupont optical a few years ago. They used a silver coating rather than aluminum and it ended up tarnishing which caused the CD's to stop playing.

By consequence, I have a large collection of CD's (over 1,000) many dating back to the 80's, and with the exception of one disc that was manufactured by Dupont which has the silver tarnish problem, they all still play. They have all been well treated in that they have been stored in their cases, but I have seen no reason to suspect that they will not continue to play for a good number of years yet.

CDR's, by consequence, have a totally different construction. They have an oscillating groove, that is used by the recorder to lay out the burn, however, this makes them more difficult to track when being read by a drive/CD player. You can run into problems when playing them with Technics or Panasonic drives as they use linear tracking as against the radial tracking that Phillips style drives do. They also record the data by burning away a dye coating, this appears to be the major problem in that these dye's break down over time.
Thanks for the technical info. I am also aware that public perceives CDrs as inferior and that is that. I generally back up all my music, did on casettes before CDs mainly for convenience reasons, so I am OK. But I would not guarantee CDr or a CD, no matter what specs the industry tells me. CDrs I send out are supposed to last 100 years, well, that is a laugh. I remember when CDs came out they were showing how you can drill a hole in them and they still play.... Now just a thumbprint causes them to malfunction. So I take all the specs with more tan a speck of salt.
Old 14th September 2011
  #20
Here for the gear
 

We've had a lot of success with the Taiyo Yuden CDr and DVDr. Of course, what makes a CDr so great is also what makes it less than perfect. But when burned slower - we don't go faster than 16x - we've had people tell us that they thought that their music sounded better than the original master. Go figure.

Duplication has its place. If someone only requires a small quantity, it would be irresponsible to require them to replicate 500 or more.

And archiving is indeed different than producing a product for end user consumption.

Hard to say what the next 50 years will bring in terms how well the CDS hold up - let's just hope that there are devices to play them on!
Old 15th September 2011
  #21
Lives for gear
 
hbphotoav's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CDMaker View Post
... Hard to say what the next 50 years will bring in terms how well the CDS hold up - let's just hope that there are devices to play them on!
Don't forget... there are still machines that can "play" the remaining Edison cylinders, wire from wire recorders, and lacquer Victrola disks. It isn't cheap, and it isn't necessarily easy, but there are ways to transcribe them for either enjoyment or archival storage.
Old 15th September 2011
  #22
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hbphotoav View Post
Don't forget... there are still machines that can "play" the remaining Edison cylinders, wire from wire recorders, and lacquer Victrola disks. It isn't cheap, and it isn't necessarily easy, but there are ways to transcribe them for either enjoyment or archival storage.
True, however analog media degrades "gracefully." There are ways to recover at least something usable from a scratched area on an LP or wax cylinder.

Digital media doesn't degrade gracefully and gradually like that. When digital media goes sour, we get black holes of data dropouts, that may or may not be recoverable (and usually isn't, when a CD or DVD dies). It's like the difference between old analog phone tech and our brave new digital cell phone age. It used to be that we'd get static on the line, but you could still hear the conversation. Now, it just drops out and disappears. It reminds me of a joke I heard recently about an elderly person who wanted to know why phones don't work anymore.
Old 15th September 2011
  #23
Lives for gear
 
Roland's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDMaker View Post
We've had a lot of success with the Taiyo Yuden CDr and DVDr. Of course, what makes a CDr so great is also what makes it less than perfect. But when burned slower - we don't go faster than 16x - we've had people tell us that they thought that their music sounded better than the original master. Go figure.

Duplication has its place. If someone only requires a small quantity, it would be irresponsible to require them to replicate 500 or more.

And archiving is indeed different than producing a product for end user consumption.

Hard to say what the next 50 years will bring in terms how well the CDS hold up - let's just hope that there are devices to play them on!

The Taiyo disc's of course have one of the best reputations amongst CDR brand's, however, their reputation is built upon their low block error rates. This is no indication as to their long term stability, if the coating breaks down, it breaks down and the disc becomes unplayable.

I've not been making the case for CD's against CDR's for archiving purposes, just the factor that the difference in manufacturing techniques means that CDR's have a limited lifespan that already is starting to get documented. CD's have been around for 30 years and in the vast majority of cases, (subject of course to lack of mistreatment or accidental damage) do still play. The situation with Dupont was a one of scenario with a manufacturer that decided to use a silver coating rather than the usual sputtered, coating that every other manufacturer I know of uses. Aluminum sputtered discs do not suffer this discoloration problem.

I'm not talking about denying a customer the chance to make copies via CDR, particularly if their use if for demo, promo, etc, however, it is certainly unfair on an end user that buy's a "CD" retail, then finds in 5-10 years it no longer plays. He doesn't know that the band decided to go with CDR's to"cheapen-up" on the product because they couldn't afford to press 500 CD's with a plant, but he's been sold a product that is certainly inferior in relationship to it's potential lifespan.

I don't expect you to necessarily agree with me, however, your forum name and your tag do suggest that you are unlikely to be totally unbiased in your view.
Old 15th September 2011
  #24
Lives for gear
 
Corran's Avatar
 

A couple of thoughts.

These days the first thing almost anyone does when they buy a CD is stick it in their computer and rip it into iTunes (except me, I hate iTunes!). At that point the CD is either lost or put away and never used again. Even if they do listen to it a few times it's usually not that long. Now 3-5 years ago maybe the market wasn't so saturated with mp3 players so the customers didn't do this.

This is coming from the standpoint of the typical CD duplication of high school concerts and the like. I use high-quality media (TY, Verbatim, etc.) and I haven't had a single complaint about failing CD's even from my first gigs 6-7 years ago. They are all on the clients' computers; I've had plenty of requests for replacements of lost CD's though! (Including one poor girl whose laptop was stolen with the CD in it before she even listened to it).

Everything digital fails eventually. If you sell your business to a spry young person in a few decades will you expect him to replace CD's that are failing after 40-50 years of use??
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump