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How Do I "Remote Record" As A Full-Time Job??
Old 20th December 2005
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Talking How Do I "Remote Record" As A Full-Time Job??

Jay Frigoletto:

I came across your posting on GEARSLUTZ and visited your WEB-site, looking at both your studio and remote recording facilities. Both are, of course, very impressive!!

I've built up an "On-Location" recording facility, nowhere near what you have, but for a 1-person operation it's OK (it also fits into my Chevy Cavalier!!). My system consists of a MACKIE SDR24/96 fed by 3-PreSonus "Digi-Max" 8-channel mic pre's (using the ADAT 'out's & in's). I have over 50 microphones available from SE Electronics, SENNHEISER, NADY, EV, Rode and ROYER.

My mixing & production gear consists of a MACKIE 32*8 board, DynAudio BM-15A powered monitors, 2-mono and 5-stereo TC Electronic "Triple-C" compressors, a TC Electronic "Finalizer", 3-PreSonus "ACP-88's", a SONY "W66" professional CD writer and various effects and reverb processors. In addition, I have spent about $4,000 on acoustic treatment material from Acoustic Sciences Corp. that I've installed into my mixing control room (11.5' X 18'). I tried to do things right!

I've recorded some classical music (brass quintets, woodwind quintets, 90-voice choirs w/pipe organ), some 2 and 3-person acoustic groups, some heavy blues and heavy-metal bands, etc., but I just can't seem to get enough business to keep myself busy doing just "On-Location" recording my main job!! None of the above artists/groups/musicians ever have enough money to actually PAY me for my recording services. So.....my question to you is: What can I possibly do to get to the level where various musical entities will actually PAY me to record and produce them??

As someone here has also mentioned, I have about 30-years of experience (on and off) having done pretty much the same thing during the mid-70's. Musicians back then didn't have any money either!! 30-years later, it's no different!!

I keep myself alive by working as a "Senior Electronics Mechanical Packaging & PCB Designer", but doing what YOU do is what I've always wanted to do all of my life!! I've been "on-the-road" with a rock band and with a PA company as a sound engineer and MUCH prefer the life of working in audio over working in corporate laboratories. I just don't know how to market my "On-Location" recording services to those entities who are capable of having the money to PAY to have this type of work done.

By reading this thread, I see that there are several guys/companies who seem to be able to make a living doing remote recordings.....I just haven't found the key!!

Any suggestions? Anyone??

Thanks to all who have spent the time to read this and THANK YOU to anyone who answers back. [email protected]

Thanks!

JBWilliams
Old 21st December 2005
  #2
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
The post you wrote in the "What multitrack recorder for remote work?" thread was valuble and a very important topic...

I didn't think the topic was relative to that thread.
So I split the thread in two and started this new one for you.

I trust we can continue the discussion regarding your issues here.

Also consider checking the Remote Possibilities archives for more information on this topic -- we have discussed this in detail before.

All the best!
Old 23rd December 2005
  #3
Lives for gear
 

Hi JB,

While I don't do strictly remote recording, it is an increasingly large portion of my business. I do however make 100% of my income from my recording business....

I think you're making a mistake by undervaluing (free! tutt ) your work.
It has been my experience that musicians DO have money, but like everyone, they will avoid spending it if they can. Sometimes by standing firm on your price (providing it's reasonable) will gain you respect from potential clients. Your confidence in your abilities and the quality of your work will win them over in the end. Perception is a HUGE factor when it comes to value. People often equate price with quality (for right or wrong).....You DON"T want to be known as the guy who will work for free. Trust me on that one....it's a never ending cycle that's hard to break out of.


Just my 24 bits....
Old 26th December 2005
  #4
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Listen to exactly what Zak said!! He is absolutely on point with this matter.

Raise your rates to equal your quality and service. Make sure you match them correctly -- Now, that's valuable.
Old 26th December 2005
  #5
Lives for gear
 
Don S's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zakco
Hi JB,

I think you're making a mistake by undervaluing (free! tutt ) your work.
It has been my experience that musicians DO have money, but like everyone, they will avoid spending it if they can.
Absolutely!

People only value what they pay for!
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