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Live recording at major festival Audio Interfaces
Old 29th March 2010
  #31
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Sigma's Avatar
2 mics on an almost 45 deg for near crowd.. 2 mics face forward for far crowd

if you have the tracks
Old 29th March 2010
  #32
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Where is the splitter usually situated? Side stage, FOH?

Bearing this in mind, where would be the best place to setup my rig?
Old 30th March 2010
  #33
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
Where is the splitter usually situated? Side stage, FOH?

Bearing this in mind, where would be the best place to setup my rig?
The split is on the stage

dude i worked on the VR in the apollo studio because i didn't want to be shoehorned inna truck and i had 40 inputs

if you are off site and can hear it's much better
Old 30th March 2010
  #34
Gear Head
 

Won't have that luxury i'm afraid.

Best scenario i can hope for is side of the stage, beside monitor desk, taking the split and setting up a few audience mics at the front of the stage.

I've played on this stage before so im familiar with the layout which is a bonus.
Old 30th March 2010
  #35
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
Won't have that luxury i'm afraid.

Best scenario i can hope for is side of the stage, beside monitor desk, taking the split and setting up a few audience mics at the front of the stage.

I've played on this stage before so im familiar with the layout which is a bonus.
then def just worry about a good clean signal to work with later
Old 30th March 2010
  #36
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Do yourself and your client a favor. Hire a professional location recording company and manage, then mix the project.

There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Let experienced professionals handle the foot work and logistics.

Not to be rude, but from your posts it shows you have no experience with live sound or live recording. A studio background is of little or no use in a live situation. Just like in the studio, it takes years to properly learn live sound and live recording.

It seems your job is to produce a finished mix for the client. They don't care who owns, setup, or manages the gear. Neither does the FOH or sound crew. Find someone who knows how to do it. Supervise the project and do a good job for the client. That should be your focus.

I can tell you, you can't record live sitting next to a monitor desk. Your better off mixing in a parking lot than at that position.

I also don't know how you can figure what a "good" budget is when you don't know anything about this. I've used everything from a 2 track to the largest trucks Ed Greene ever built. Budgets ranged from $0 to $50,000 per day. Generally not good to settle for a price on a job when you have no concept of what it could cost.
Old 30th March 2010
  #37
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ssaudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
I'm also a little lost here in terms of external equipment i'd need eg. Splitters/preamps etc, so any advice would be greatly appreciated
Bring at least 2 assistants and have your own comms sytem (you will have to clear the comms with the Production manager). You cannot rely on mobile phones at a festival.
You will have to setup backstage and most likely in the back of a van, it is very unlikely there will be any room for you elsewhere, so be prepared for at least a 150' multi-core cable run.
Be prepared to monitor almost exclusively on closed backed headphones - unless you are very lucky you will not be able to park your unsoundproofed van in anything like a quiet spot.
You will need to ask for power - you could supply your own, but I doubt you can afford it.
Splits wise, you will have to supply your own - unless you are psychic, budget for 48 channels of active splits with the accompanying multi-core
You will have absolutely no interfacing be it technical or personal with the FOH guys beyond a simple line-check - you might get more, but don't count on it - be nice to them and they'll give you a comms link. If you get comms, don't abuse them - you are the least important guy there, unobtrusiveness is key.
You will have to use the mics/DI's they provide, but they will let you rig your own ambient stage, audience and PA mics - but you will need the appropriate clamps and meet all H&SE requirements.
Make sure you are running a backup system.
Make sure every bit of gear you bring is properly tested and carries the correct certification - I've seen 'installation equipment' having to be removed because of missing PAT stickers many a time - people can be very fussy at events.
Make sure you are aware of all the documentation and legal issues that are involved with the recordings.
Plan all this in advance with the relevant Production Manager - leave no stone unturned.
Be clear on all your contractual obligations.

Good luck
Old 30th March 2010
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
ehhh i was scared the first time i did a live recording [patti labelle at the apollo]

get a splitter use as many mikes as you can that will sound good from the FOH guy..but make sure you have your go to mikes..make SURE any sub mixers on the stage [think keyboard player with a buncha modules] are in phase with separate outs of main keyboard outs that you might split out before the submixer

have them TEST and retest the wireless mikes for vocals

make sure you have peak limiters set up on any tracks that are dynamic because a squash is far less annoying than overload jizz..we were running two 48 track sony digital tape recorders staggered

you'll be fine and you'll prob love it

i put in my agreement that i could go to a few shows of the artists before i did my gig..that way i could see the live set up and review stuff beforehand

the worst i had to deal with was the butthead stage manager who put the friggin fog machines behind the background singers and the FOH eng that was pissed that he wasn't doing the recording who threw phase reversal on some keyboard DI boxes [ lame and easily caught]

make friends with as many of the crew as you can

You obviously don't do much live recording...and if you do...you are giving the wrong advice...sorry have to be blunt like a couple of others...it's not about getting a splitter and making sure the DI's phase isn't flipped...it's about incorporating your gear into the festival situation when everyone there really doesn't want you there...getting in and setting up early...how's that gonna happen...having 48 channels conversion &mic pres in a rack patched and ready to go...with a backup system...how's that gonna happen...how are you monitoring this? when do you get to line check.?... which is more involved when there's a three way split...what if the monitor guy is getting buzzes on channels after you set up your split...what are you gonna say? do?...I'm only touching the surface here...any FOH guy isn't gonna want you around... because you are taking up precious stage time and space...being able to get in, set up and invisible takes some experience and that's only some of what you need to do that gig...you should start in a smaller setting to get your feet wet...or better yet, head over to remote possibilities and hire a couple of those guys to do it while you assist and learn.

Trying to help.
Old 30th March 2010
  #39
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Seb RIOU's Avatar
 

wow guys, chill out.
I was reluctant when I thought it was a major Stage A multitrack recording, but for a 1000 people stage, I think ali.harman should definetely do it.

He'll get the thrills, maybe puke seconds before GO, but if he gets his **** together and use good advice (like Mike's) , he'll be fine.
Old 30th March 2010
  #40
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Sigma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
You obviously don't do much live recording...and if you do...you are giving the wrong advice...sorry have to be blunt like a couple of others...it's not about getting a splitter and making sure the DI's phase isn't flipped...it's about incorporating your gear into the festival situation when everyone there really doesn't want you there...getting in and setting up early...how's that gonna happen...having 48 channels conversion &mic pres in a rack patched and ready to go...with a backup system...how's that gonna happen...how are you monitoring this? when do you get to line check.?... which is more involved when there's a three way split...what if the monitor guy is getting buzzes on channels after you set up your split...what are you gonna say? do?...I'm only touching the surface here...any FOH guy isn't gonna want you around... because you are taking up precious stage time and space...being able to get in, set up and invisible takes some experience and that's only some of what you need to do that gig...you should start in a smaller setting to get your feet wet...or better yet, head over to remote possibilities and hire a couple of those guys to do it while you assist and learn.

Trying to help.
i'd do the same thing as when there are 20 musicians in the studio on union budget..basic audio is basic audio..if you don't know how to quickly trace out a hum or buzz go into the fast food biz..it ain't rocket science

only did 3 "concert" remotes but they were decent acts..patti labelle ... brian mcnight and parts of pieces of a dream with gerald veasley...and had no problems..live concert tracking isn't much different than the studio..and if he was asked then people trust him already

it's not like asking the guy to do FOH or monitors
Old 30th March 2010
  #41
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Jim Kerr's Avatar
 

Hire out - learn.

Even if you want to get into live sound as a career I don't think you want to get your feet wet this way. Yeah you could rent a splitter and set up your new gear and set your levels and thats IS all it takes but there IS so much more..Everything that these guys are saying is true. Invisibility etc. You could pull it off, but you really would have to make a big "to-do" list.

If you go for it .....find out if the monitor desk is the split. A lot of venues run the mic lines into the monitor desk and then direct out of the channels to FOH if that's the case you will need your own transformer balanced split. Forget about getting anything out of monitors at that point, plus the monitor guy is gonna be way busy.

If the venues has a split on the stage then MAYBE you can jump on the direct outs of the monitor console. If you go with a Tascam x48 or hd24 you'll probably be ok in regards of grounding issues ie NOISE.

If you do introduce a hum into the line it will have to be fixed...as in "unplug that"

find out if you are allowed to lift a ground OF YOUR GEAR ONLY in the venue. OF YOUR GEAR ONLY. (There are laws about this.)

Definitely make friends.

You said the FOH guy is a good friend, let him set you up with his direct outs or whatever if that is an option. Don't expect to get the inserts.

A lot of bands have their own FOH and they will yank a 24 ch "oh he's recording the show for someone" snake from the inserts like Tarzan. So yeah forget the inserts.

Definitely don't get a stage hand in trouble by asking them for help.

DO NOT TOUCH ANYTHING THAT IS NOT YOURS!!!

DON'T EVEN TOUCH YOUR OWN STUFF.. ask before you unplug something even if its your own.

Rent the gear. A split alone can cost $2000 new.

24bit LEAVE HEADROOM

If you don't get these things in order - hire out. Plus what's wrong with hiring out. You'll get what you need I think. Either way have fun.
Old 30th March 2010
  #42
Gear Head
 

I am slightly confused by the level of fuss this has caused.

There are plenty of small time engineers who offer live recording at gigs. A typical budget setup is from my recent research:

2x 8 channel radial spliiter
2x Maudio Profire 2626
1x Macbook pro

Not the best compared to the 48 channel spltter etc. However live recordings are done using this or a similar setup, and the results are fairly decent. I shall be going above this spec level, however it can and is done on a budget similar to this.

I shall clarify a few things for those who've come in late to the thread:

1) The gig isn't till August, I will be getting live sound experience between now and then (with the company who supply the system at the festival). I am using this forum to get a basis of information before meeting up with these guys so I don't look like a nob chinning them about the basics of live recording.

2) The company who are paying me, are paying them. They are good guys (very unlike the apparent unhelpful, destructive nobheads some of you seem to be describing. I have toured extensively in the US & UK and I know the type you mean).
Old 30th March 2010
  #43
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It seems cool. You know I think a lot of the responses including mine are just cause you state that you are new to this and being new is kewl as anything else, we all we're new at some point right? You seem like you know the scene and if the crew is cool then they should help you out if you need it. You could just take the FOH guy aside and say "dude..this is my first time..blah blah" throw him a fifty..you know. Its just if it gets crazy then it gets crazy. We've all seen it and the responses here are just to avoid that.
I would feel fine with that budget rig no prob. Go for it!
Old 30th March 2010
  #44
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
I am slightly confused by the level of fuss this has caused.

There are plenty of small time engineers who offer live recording at gigs. A typical budget setup is from my recent research:

2x 8 channel radial spliiter
2x Maudio Profire 2626
1x Macbook pro

Not the best compared to the 48 channel spltter etc. However live recordings are done using this or a similar setup, and the results are fairly decent. I shall be going above this spec level, however it can and is done on a budget similar to this.

I shall clarify a few things for those who've come in late to the thread:

1) The gig isn't till August, I will be getting live sound experience between now and then (with the company who supply the system at the festival). I am using this forum to get a basis of information before meeting up with these guys so I don't look like a nob chinning them about the basics of live recording.

2) The company who are paying me, are paying them. They are good guys (very unlike the apparent unhelpful, destructive nobheads some of you seem to be describing. I have toured extensively in the US & UK and I know the type you mean).
Just get stuck in sunshine, follow the advice given but dont let it dishearten you. It wont go perfectly smoothly but what does, especially first time. I will agree you should get a wench to help you. I work in a medium sized club and do FOH and recording and I have done some great recordings IMO. I have only just got a mate to come in and help me do things like cabeling, mic stands and such. Just make sure its someone whos work you dont feel you need to double check. Also think Is it a major band if its not you wont need a major budget. great things can be recorded on not so expensive equipment. Just make sure its reliable. And you have your tech side sorted. I THINK YOU SHOULD GET OFF THIS FORUM AND RESEACH LIVE RECORDING FROM LIVE RECORDING WEBSITES, reseach PASSIVE splitters, 24 bit, preamps, interfaces and so on
Old 30th March 2010
  #45
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this is great info..i'll be recording a small festival soon with 2 api and great river pres on a rosetta and a profire 2626 i just traded out for my digi002 for better pres and higher track counts.
Old 30th March 2010
  #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plexisys View Post
Do yourself and your client a favor. Hire a professional location recording company and manage, then mix the project.
Do this.

You're still involved, your name still gets on the final result, and it will be done properly... Not to mention you'll learn a hell of a lot in the process... Such as: don't get in the fvcking way, learn how to read individuals "annoyance" level, not to mention a lot of tech stuff.

There is simply too much gear to rent/buy to do this properly, especially if it's your first job. You don't even know if you like it or not yet.

Keep this in mind: This isn't an optional service that you happen to be offering to your client that already hired you for FOH or something else... They are HIRING YOU TO RECORD THE STAGE. If anything happens, and it will, it's on you. It's not an "oh well" situation... You didn't do your freakin job!

If you were asking how to occasionally offer live multitrack recordings to your FOH clients, that would be cool as hell!!! HOWEVER, that's not the case... You're bidding on a job that you don't have the equipment, staff, or knowledge to handle. You not only have potential to give yourself a bad reputation, but you also might be giving sound dudes everywhere a bad name...

Ya know... ALL priests like little boys...

Hire out the live bit, and then take over for the post part....
Old 30th March 2010
  #47
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Ive done loads of live work now and my opinion is dont listen to the people here making it sound like an impossible task that you cannot do because it isnt that bad.. It sounds like the gig is a bit bigger than you would prefer to have early on but if you cover yourself well then its not that hard...

Organise with a hire company to get ISO line splitters and make sure you test them before you get to the gig.. You are going to want to split the signal either off stage or before the FOH. I would suggest off stage, so stage lines will hit your splitter first and then out to the normal stagebox.. This will of course be split afterwards also for foldback and FOH, but you should come first in the process.. You should have cables ready to feed off your splitter to stagebox, that way the only change the event engineers have had to accomodate is plugging into your split instead of the stagebox..

I would suggest you get a splitter that allows 3 way split so one can go to the normal stagebox/FOH and you can take two feeds for yourself and run a dedicated hardware recorder on one and use your second split for a DAW. That means you will need double pre amps and cabling for every line you are taking off stage.. Be ready to have loads of cables..

Get a copy of the stage plot and know where you can set up that is sheltered and has access to power that is also out of everyones way, ideally behind the stage if you can because this allows you to monitor without being as affected by volume from foldback or FOH. So you also need to ensure you have long cabling for all your lines.. Make sure your power source is clean and isnt taken from lighting etc.. Dont be piggy backing power off something dodgey..

Some other things i would suggest is make sure you get there really early and have your stuff setup well before anyone even starts doing line checks.. You want to be able to monitor every single thing that happens as its going, and give yourself time to overcome any probs.. I would suggest you also take an iPod or something and use it as a dummy source into the splitters before they get the stage mics and lines up, that way you know every line into your pre amps and recorders are working on the day.

Also be prepared to give the FOH the direct line from the splitters and you take the isolated splits.. That means you will need to run your own phantom power off your pres for anything that needs it, but it allows FOH to operate their own phantom power also, this means you are more invisible to them..

Another thing to consider is crowd mics.. At the very least i would suggest 2 x shotguns pointed off stage out towards the crowd, you could add some wireless mics out near FOH also if you wanted.. You need to at least get some of the ambience from the gig but then its often helpful to embelish crowd tracks with samples when mixing..

Those are the main things you need to worry about.. Just get there early and be ready to get no support from anyone.. Sounds harsh but its reality.. Also be prepared that something is going to stop working or fail so ensure you have two systems recording.. If you can, get someone along with you to help..

If all goes well you will enjoy it.. Its a totally different dynamic to studio and it can be really great.. If you are lucky you might capture a few really great recordings which can be inpsiring to mix..
Old 30th March 2010
  #48
Just don´t forget to record the audience.

Its a fail to mix a live record without the energy of the people singing and clapping.
Old 31st March 2010
  #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papanauta View Post
Its a fail to mix a live record without the energy of the people singing and clapping.
Indeed
Old 31st March 2010
  #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigma View Post
i'd do the same thing as when there are 20 musicians in the studio on union budget..basic audio is basic audio..if you don't know how to quickly trace out a hum or buzz go into the fast food biz..it ain't rocket science

only did 3 "concert" remotes but they were decent acts..patti labelle ... brian mcnight and parts of pieces of a dream with gerald veasley...and had no problems..live concert tracking isn't much different than the studio..and if he was asked then people trust him already

it's not like asking the guy to do FOH or monitors
actually it is just as nerve racking and difficult...Live concert tracking is definitely different...I can't believe what you are suggesting Sig..you seem to have a ton of experience in the studio

Quickly tracing out a hum and a buzz from a three way split in a live hostile environment when there is zero time (and so many unknown variables) is not easy my friend...I do both for living and I can assure you that a 1000 person venue is very substantial size and will probably have noted and decent acts..and the OP will not pull it off and will definitely look stupid doing it....again, I'm not suggesting the OP doesn't do it, but rather do it under supervision from someone with good experience...also..

...ANY size venue deserves a pro attitude and approach...the thinking that "oh it's only the small stage" is really poor...and won't get you anywhere...you gotta treat it the same wherever you are and whoever you are doing it with...that's the gig


Now go grab a coupla guys in Steve's forum and do a good job.
Old 31st March 2010
  #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebulb View Post
Ive done loads of live work now and my opinion is dont listen to the people here making it sound like an impossible task that you cannot do because it isnt that bad.. It sounds like the gig is a bit bigger than you would prefer to have early on but if you cover yourself well then its not that hard...

Organise with a hire company to get ISO line splitters and make sure you test them before you get to the gig.. You are going to want to split the signal either off stage or before the FOH. I would suggest off stage, so stage lines will hit your splitter first and then out to the normal stagebox.. This will of course be split afterwards also for foldback and FOH, but you should come first in the process.. You should have cables ready to feed off your splitter to stagebox, that way the only change the event engineers have had to accomodate is plugging into your split instead of the stagebox..

I would suggest you get a splitter that allows 3 way split so one can go to the normal stagebox/FOH and you can take two feeds for yourself and run a dedicated hardware recorder on one and use your second split for a DAW. That means you will need double pre amps and cabling for every line you are taking off stage.. Be ready to have loads of cables..

Get a copy of the stage plot and know where you can set up that is sheltered and has access to power that is also out of everyones way, ideally behind the stage if you can because this allows you to monitor without being as affected by volume from foldback or FOH. So you also need to ensure you have long cabling for all your lines.. Make sure your power source is clean and isnt taken from lighting etc.. Dont be piggy backing power off something dodgey..

Some other things i would suggest is make sure you get there really early and have your stuff setup well before anyone even starts doing line checks.. You want to be able to monitor every single thing that happens as its going, and give yourself time to overcome any probs.. I would suggest you also take an iPod or something and use it as a dummy source into the splitters before they get the stage mics and lines up, that way you know every line into your pre amps and recorders are working on the day.

Also be prepared to give the FOH the direct line from the splitters and you take the isolated splits.. That means you will need to run your own phantom power off your pres for anything that needs it, but it allows FOH to operate their own phantom power also, this means you are more invisible to them..

Another thing to consider is crowd mics.. At the very least i would suggest 2 x shotguns pointed off stage out towards the crowd, you could add some wireless mics out near FOH also if you wanted.. You need to at least get some of the ambience from the gig but then its often helpful to embelish crowd tracks with samples when mixing..

Those are the main things you need to worry about.. Just get there early and be ready to get no support from anyone.. Sounds harsh but its reality.. Also be prepared that something is going to stop working or fail so ensure you have two systems recording.. If you can, get someone along with you to help..

If all goes well you will enjoy it.. Its a totally different dynamic to studio and it can be really great.. If you are lucky you might capture a few really great recordings which can be inpsiring to mix..
You just explained why he shouldn't do it...he has no clue of any of the above process...no one said it was impossible. We're trying to be realistic. I could care less if the guy falls flat on his face or if he gets annointed the next king of audio.

Again give yourself a fighting chance and bring a pro or two
Old 31st March 2010
  #52
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edva's Avatar
Two or three Metric Halo 2882's and a Mac, with direct outs provided by your friend at FOH, will get you a long way. Very simple in this type of scenario.
Old 31st March 2010
  #53
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Brian Cares's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
You just explained why he shouldn't do it...he has no clue of any of the above process...no one said it was impossible. We're trying to be realistic. I could care less if the guy falls flat on his face or if he gets annointed the next king of audio.

Again give yourself a fighting chance and bring a pro or two

Well. I have been in pretty much the same situation. All what these guys say is true.

BUT: Its manageable. I mean: youre a sound engineer. Are you?


Just take all the advice, try to figure out your setup before you go there. Try to gather as much information as you could possibly get.

Check the splitter situation.

Check the stage management. Try to find the REALLY important person. When i did my first live recording gig at the mainstage of a huge festival everybody would behave like azz.

Everybody? No. The guy who really understood my situation and really tried to help me out was the mainstage mangager. All of his assistants would ignore me completely. But he would even do a linecheck for me while Animal Collective performed. He also would come to my recording truck and hand over the tracksheets for the upcoming acts. He just behaved like a real pro.

Make sure you get the tracksheets. Sometimes bands have weird layouts..

Try to setup a stagecam to see what happens while soundcheck.

Consider the Alesis HD24 for recording. These are rocksolid and i would trust them more than any laptop computer. Note that these come without preamps. You will need preamp banks or a board with preamps.

I dont get the anti-thingy on this thread. We all have (had) to start at some certain point. With some research and very good preparation you can do this gig, no problem.

I was a little afraid when i got the offer to do my first job of this kind and asked colleagues to help me out. But as no one had the time to come with me i was on my own.

I HAD TO manage the whole situation. Of course there were quite some quirks in the whole process. But finally this job led me to mix a bunch of major league bands. I even was asked to mix Oasis for lifestreaming but i respectfully rejected the offer as THIS was really a bit too much
Old 31st March 2010
  #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
You just explained why he shouldn't do it...he has no clue of any of the above process...no one said it was impossible. We're trying to be realistic. I could care less if the guy falls flat on his face or if he gets annointed the next king of audio.

Again give yourself a fighting chance and bring a pro or two

He had no glue of the process before i posted, but he does now

If you are an experienced studio engineer and you know how to patch in signal and troubleshoot in a studio, its not unrealistic to transition it out live.. Most of your success will be down to good preparation.

I totally support the idea of being cautious and not over stepping your abilities but at the same time this idea of hum or buzz being out of control and not being able to locate without "pro's" around is over reacting a bit i think..
Old 31st March 2010
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebulb View Post
He had no glue of the process before i posted, but he does now

If you are an experienced studio engineer and you know how to patch in signal and troubleshoot in a studio, its not unrealistic to transition it out live.. Most of your success will be down to good preparation.

I totally support the idea of being cautious and not over stepping your abilities but at the same time this idea of hum or buzz being out of control and not being able to locate without "pro's" around is over reacting a bit i think..

No it's not overeacting. This is what we do. We don't get paid to mix at FOH. We get paid to mix in any given situation. Same applies to live recording. There is no anti anything coming from this guy. I'm all for expanding those horizons..

have to say...most of the "just do it...you'll never know until you try" comments are just bull****....of course you have to beleive you can do something and try to improve and get better and all of that...but with an attitude of "this is a small stage...I'll just grab the inserts from FOH...I'm an engineer how hard can it be?"...you are going to get carved a new asshole by the production crew...and rightly so.

I don't think the OP should do this gig.
Old 31st March 2010
  #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
No it's not overeacting.
Its my feeling that some of the resposnses here really only qualify as discouragement.. It doesnt sound like the OPs skill and experience is so far off this to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
have to say...most of the "just do it...you'll never know until you try" comments are just bull****....of course you have to beleive you can do something and try to improve and get better and all of that...but with an attitude of "this is a small stage...I'll just grab the inserts from FOH...I'm an engineer how hard can it be?"...you are going to get carved a new asshole by the production crew...and rightly so.
Anyone who carves a new asshole to someone just because they dont know something is a moron, and there are a few that you learn to ignore.. But if you stay respectful and follow the tips in this thread that generally wont happen..

Yes trying to take lines off inserts at a large festival is a recipe for disaster but thats why you explain the alternatives.. Seems to me like the only thing the OP didnt really know about was the ISO splitters which is understandable since you wouldnt need them in a typical studio enviroment..

Also whats ridiculous is many manuals for external recorders will actually suggest using inserts as the source for the recorder, which makes it understandable why some people might think this way at first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by glissando View Post
I don't think the OP should do this gig.
yes i got that feeling.
Old 31st March 2010
  #57
Gear Head
 

Situation is:

I have to record 1 track per band (16 bands playing on the stage over three days). So that's 16 songs to record and mix. I will be there with my setup from the moment the power is switched on (the day before the festival opens to the public), and my equipment will be subject to the same line checks as the FOH and monitors. I have ensured this will happen on the basis of the info gained from this forum.

I'm not going into this blind. I will be buying a setup suitable for recording in a variety of venues and will be testing my system out before the festival.

As I have already mentioned, I will have the support of the FOH PA guys, and can get them to order a three-way splitter in order to accomodate me, and ask them for assistance for anything else I may need (within obvious reason). This is not just because I know them and they're nice chaps, as I have already said it's because the accomodation of the live recording will be in their contracts.

This is the first recording I have done out of the studio and really didn't have a clue about the live stiuation. I was using the advice on this forum in order to get me started before going to the FOH guys. I will be doing a lot more research, and will have a few live recordings under my belt (albeit in a smaller venues) before the FOH guys ever get a sniff of me. There will still be a lot to learn by that point but I will be in a much more knowledgable position.

Yes there are a few major things I didn't know, but that has been rectified for the most part thanks to a certain few members of the forum who decided to write a few paragraphs offering very helpful information and advice, as opposed to spending the same amount of time ranting about why I shouldn't do it.

Reading back over my initial post, it's clear I wasn't specific enough about the finer details, and I apologise for that, however i'm only just getting all the info from the festivial as to what's expected from me. This it seems led to a certain few having a bit of a freak out.

I am very grateful for all comments, however at one point I was ready to throw the towel in and pass up a very good opportunity.
Old 31st March 2010
  #58
Lives for gear
I do a lot of remotes, and often tag the console. I see this a little differently, although all the advice given was good.

If you are basically there for the duration of the show, and you have been hired by the promoter, who also hired the sound company, who you say you know, I think its worth a conversation to tag either the FOH or Monitor console. You say ita a side stage....I have to wonder if they are pating evough to warrant you showing up with a splitter, a console, a redundant recording.

If they are....thats the preferred way to go. But I will bet they are not.

In which case you might want to investigate some of the other options. If you can wire your set up in one time and not have to be bugging them all the time, it might be a workable situation. You might investigate if the console DI has a jumper to make it pre EQ, and even if you have to offer to switch the jumpers for the company they might be willing to let you.

Granted, there are a lot of variables there, but if the relationships work I think its worth investigating. One thing on your side is you have time to work this out.

I disagree with those that tell you to back out, although I don't disagree you are under qualified. But it insn't rocket science, and if theyliked you enough to ask you to do it, I'm guessing you can.

The JoeCo boxes, if they work as advertised are a great idea. I do most of mine with Tascam MX24s tagging the FOH, and it has worked great. Ten commercially released CDs.
Old 31st March 2010
  #59
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
Yes there are a few major things I didn't know, but that has been rectified for the most part thanks to a certain few members of the forum who decided to write a few paragraphs offering very helpful information and advice, as opposed to spending the same amount of time ranting about why I shouldn't do it.
Exactly my point.. The whole purpose of a forum is to ask questions like you were and get answers before you put yourself in any position.. Not to just be told you cant do it because you werent aware of a few points..

The fact you have said you will be doing some low key gigs before the festival also suggests you will be in a better position.. Just dont get complacent with anything if it goes smooth the first few times..


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali.harman View Post
I am very grateful for all comments, however at one point I was ready to throw the towel in and pass up a very good opportunity.
Which would have been a shame.. Best of luck.
Old 31st March 2010
  #60
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steffmo View Post
I do most of mine with Tascam MX24s tagging the FOH, and it has worked great. Ten commercially released CDs.
Have you ever had any probs at all with the tascam MX24 live ? Any drop outs of any kind or other criticisms of it ?
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