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Jaco Pastorius
Old 13th March 2018
  #181
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
Wasn't George Garzone a thing then at that area?
Huge! The Fringe had one of the longest running gigs in Boston. I studied with Rich Appleman for a while, the bassist on that gig.

Also, two other big influences on the scene were teacher Charlie Banacos and guitarist Mick Goodrick. It seemed like everyone studied with Banacos.
Old 13th March 2018
  #182
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinhurwitz View Post
Huge! The Fringe had one of the longest running gigs in Boston. I studied with Rich Appleman for a while, the bassist on that gig.

Also, two other big influences on the scene were teacher Charlie Banacos and guitarist Mick Goodrick. It seemed like everyone studied with Banacos.
Yeah, I've heard much about the Fringe.

Speaking of tenor players in that area, Garzone and Jerry Bergonzi - two world class heavyweights, just incredible talents second to none that deserve much greater recognition. (I'd include Joe Lovano, but he's gotten plenty of acclaim)

I remember hearing a story about Michael Brecker doing a master class at Berklee, and someone asked him,"What does it feel like to be the greatest living tenor player in the world?", to which Brecker replied,"I don't know, why don't you ask Jerry Bergonzi..."
Old 13th March 2018
  #183
I did a lot of work for those jazz-fusion bands in the 1970's. Everytime one of those musicians talked about Jaco they praised his talent. Then they said he was an @sshole. I never met him so I wouldn't know.
Old 13th March 2018
  #184
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I agree and dig the comments extending what was happening during the late 70s and early 80s.

During that time I was a teenager. I used to put on a business suit and glasses and attempt to impersonate a 21-year old. I was thereby able to gain repeated entrance to San Francisco's Keystone corner, where I sat about 8 feet away from artists during typically week long gigs. A lot of people came through: McCoy Tyner, Rasaahn Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins, Stan Getz, Elvin Jones, Charlie Haden and Bill Evans. The only drink I knew how to order was a black Russian, which I would nurse along and which I can't stand to this day. I'm sorry that I never actually got to see Jaco perform live. What he did with harmonics, adjusting his hand position rapidly to pluck the string at its exact half-way point blows my mind. And at such a high speed. He could have been purple. I wouldn't have cared.

I'm aware that some great musicians have personality problems. It's okay, I'll still dig their records. Every once in a while I do get the chance to see somebody get brought down a peg or two, and that's always interesting. Once when I was a Berklee I saw Chick Corea get an attitude adjustment. He brought in one of his new compositions and dared anybody to sight read it. Newly arrived Christian Jacob (who had just finished his doctorate in classical piano from the Sorbonne), sat down at the piano, looked at the score for about a minute, then put it aside and played it perfectly from memory. Chick's mouth dropped open.
Old 13th March 2018
  #185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ttippie View Post
During that time I was a teenager. I used to put on a business suit and glasses and attempt to impersonate a 21-year old. I was thereby able to gain repeated entrance to San Francisco's Keystone corner, where I sat about 8 feet away from artists during typically week long gigs. A lot of people came through: McCoy Tyner, Rasaahn Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Sonny Rollins, Stan Getz, Elvin Jones, Charlie Haden and Bill Evans. The only drink I knew how to order was a black Russian, which I would nurse along and which I can't stand to this day.
Bright Moments!

I was too young to have caught Rasaahn (something I always regret), but I'd frequent Keystone Korner as a high school kid - they always let me in for some reason, always drank their Turkish coffee, which was thick as hell.

God, saw so much great music there: Pharoah Sanders, Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, Joe Henderson, Old and New Dreams, Bobby Hutcherson, Bruce Foreman, George Cables, Lew Tabackin, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Jessica Williams, Eddie Harris, Billy Higgins, Idris Muhammad, Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton, Stan Getz, many many more...

Also saw just as many great shows at the Great American Music Hall.

Those were amazing times to see incredible music, and be literally spitting distance away from the musicians.
Old 13th March 2018
  #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
Bright Moments!

I was too young to have caught Rasaahn (something I always regret), but I'd frequent Keystone Korner as a high school kid - they always let me in for some reason, always drank their Turkish coffee, which was thick as hell.

God, saw so much great music there: Pharoah Sanders, Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, Joe Henderson, Old and New Dreams, Bobby Hutcherson, Bruce Foreman, George Cables, Lew Tabackin, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Jessica Williams, Eddie Harris, Billy Higgins, Idris Muhammad, Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton, Stan Getz, many many more...

Also saw just as many great shows at the Great American Music Hall.

Those were amazing times to see incredible music, and be literally spitting distance away from the musicians.
Hah, small world. I took the woman who is now my wife there on our first date, and guess who we saw? Jessica Williams (who quit playing and lives in Seattle now.) Her trumpet player then, a young Tom Peron, comes over to my house to play every week. He is actually a really great teacher.

Tom has a lot of stories about Jessica. I wasn't there that night, but once when a customer was giving her a hard time, she stopped playing, got up from the piano and beat the crap out of him...then went right back to her solo. The word on the street is: watch out for her straight right hand.
Old 13th March 2018
  #187
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
Yeah, I've heard much about the Fringe.

Speaking of tenor players in that area, Garzone and Jerry Bergonzi - two world class heavyweights, just incredible talents second to none that deserve much greater recognition. (I'd include Joe Lovano, but he's gotten plenty of acclaim)

I remember hearing a story about Michael Brecker doing a master class at Berklee, and someone asked him,"What does it feel like to be the greatest living tenor player in the world?", to which Brecker replied,"I don't know, why don't you ask Jerry Bergonzi..."
Man, you are bringing me back!

Before I went to Berklee, I was at UMass Amherst. They wouldn't let me study electric bass in the music department, so it was either enter as an oboist or go to Berklee. So, to check things out, I went to Berklee and went up to the bass department to see if anyone would take me on as a student outside of the school. Bruce Gertz stepped up and schedule a lesson at his place on Beacon St. a couple of Saturday mornings later.

I drove back to Boston on the Friday before in a raging blizzard. I got to Gertz' apartment, and the streets were blanketed in snow and deserted. He answered the door all bleary eyed. "Oh man, I had a gig with Stern last night and we're still up. I cancelled all my lessons. Oh well, you came all this way, come on in." I had no idea who Stern was, but this greasy haired dude came out of the back room, and came up to me, leaning with his hand on my chest and asked "Hey man, you got anything to get high on?" And then tumbled into the kitchen. Two weeks later, I saw him play with Miles and was utterly stunned. After that, I saw Stern around Boston regularly, usually when he was gigging with Mitch Forman and Bill Evans. I even recorded some of those shows, but sadly the tapes deteriorated.

In those days, it seemed like the guitar players at Berklee were either in the Stern camp or Scofield camp and both came around regularly for clinics.

Big fun!

(Oh, and I did the recital that made the Berklee administration decide they needed rules about recitals, but that's another story).
Old 13th March 2018
  #188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwinhurwitz View Post
Man, you are bringing me back!

Before I went to Berklee, I was at UMass Amherst. They wouldn't let me study electric bass in the music department, so it was either enter as an oboist or go to Berklee. So, to check things out, I went to Berklee and went up to the bass department to see if anyone would take me on as a student outside of the school. Bruce Gertz stepped up and schedule a lesson at his place on Beacon St. a couple of Saturday mornings later.

I drove back to Boston on the Friday before in a raging blizzard. I got to Gertz' apartment, and the streets were blanketed in snow and deserted. He answered the door all bleary eyed. "Oh man, I had a gig with Stern last night and we're still up. I cancelled all my lessons. Oh well, you came all this way, come on in." I had no idea who Stern was, but this greasy haired dude came out of the back room, and came up to me, leaning with his hand on my chest and asked "Hey man, you got anything to get high on?" And then tumbled into the kitchen. Two weeks later, I saw him play with Miles and was utterly stunned. After that, I saw Stern around Boston regularly, usually when he was gigging with Mitch Forman and Bill Evans. I even recorded some of those shows, but sadly the tapes deteriorated.

In those days, it seemed like the guitar players at Berklee were either in the Stern camp or Scofield camp and both came around regularly for clinics.

Big fun!

(Oh, and I did the recital that made the Berklee administration decide they needed rules about recitals, but that's another story).
Oh, man, that's awesome. I would have loved to be a fly on the wall for that visit. Yeah, back in the day...

Once when I was playing a session, Jacki Byard (an awesome pianist) walked in..with his tenor. I immediately stood up to get off the bandstand but Jacki motioned me to sit back down. Anyway, in his gravelly voice he said only one word, "Misty". Then he counted it off about 320 metronome, which owned me. I kept messing up on the bridge. I know because he looked at me every time i did. Anyway, after a very humbling 5 minutes he called for a cadenza, took a swig of a bottle of what I assume was vodka, and said, "Eb Locrian." Then he played a mind blowing arpeggio, followed by, "Ab Lydian," and another torrent of notes. Then he looked at me and said, "I know my ****."

That was humbling. I got off the stage so fast after that you could hear a breeze behind me. But, you know, sometimes it's the hard lessons that really stick with us.

Anyway, I don't mean to hijack the thread on Jaco Pastorius. I just love listening to his music.
Old 13th March 2018
  #189
Jaki Byard grew up in Worcester MA in my dad's neighborhood. My uncle (his older brother) was a trumpet player, so Jaki was frequent houseguest and they played a bunch of gigs together back in their late teens, early 20s. What an amazing musician! No better person to get your *ss humbled by. I would have loved to be a fly on wall for that!

My uncle used to take my dad down to Birdland and sneak him in.



I'm sure Jaco would approve of the celebration of all music!
Old 6 days ago
  #190
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodrigo_Guitar View Post
I don`t get this guy. He sounds pretty average to me.

What am I missing?
You are missing a brain.
Old 6 days ago
  #191
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One Word

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodrigo_Guitar View Post
I don`t get this guy. He sounds pretty average to me.

What am I missing?
You are missing a brain!
Old 5 days ago
  #192
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First of all, you have to take Jaco in context. When he showed up on the scene he sounded like no one else had, and everyone sat up and paid attention, whether they loved it or not. And he was such an influence on bass players that his uniqueness became a common style onto itself. Imagine hearing Hendrix's first album today for the first time, after hearing decades of Hendrix influenced guitarists.

Second, he was on plenty of stuff that isn't great, so go search out his great stuff. I love his Weather Report, Word Of Mouth, Joni Mitchell stuff. You may dislike those and like something else. Plus, it's totally OK to not like his style of playing. His tone is kind of an acquired taste when it's new to you. But he was a truly high functioning bassist and musician, who contributed tons to the music he played on.
Old 5 days ago
  #193
Speaking of jazz bassists, Jamaaladeen Tacuma is my favorite recently. Totally underrated. Can't get enough of free funk, but it's hard to find many albums in that style.
Old 5 days ago
  #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pichi View Post
Speaking of jazz bassists, Jamaaladeen Tacuma is my favorite recently. Totally underrated. Can't get enough of free funk, but it's hard to find many albums in that style.
I kinda go hot and cold with Jamaaldeen.

I think he's best on James Blood Ulmer's Tales of Captain Black, with Ornette on it.
Old 5 days ago
  #195
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12tone View Post
I kinda go hot and cold with Jamaaldeen.

I think he's best on James Blood Ulmer's Tales of Captain Black, with Ornette on it.
Yeah, I have that one, it's great. But I'm especially digging his solo albums Jukebox and Renaissance Man. I haven't picked up the others yet. I love his embrace of the 'new' technology in the '80s. His funky style of playing meshes really well with drum machines and synths.
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