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Silent shutter mode, still photos.... and recording
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Lives for gear
Silent shutter mode, still photos.... and recording

It can be a worry when a stills photographer is wandering round a concert or recording session you're engineering for...great camera...but those clicks !!

Here's a solution ?

YouTube
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Lives for gear
Yes, I prefer it when the photographers at the concerts I work have taken the precaution to silence their cameras.

It's a feature that's not unique to Olympus. For example, in my Panasonic FZ2500 and FZ1000 cameras 'Silent Mode' is a menu choice that is exactly that...except that in the FZ1000 there is a tiny mechanical noise that's perceptible when your ear is 1-inch from the camera. I think the FZ2500 is completely silent in that respect.

Last edited by MediaGary; 1 week ago at 03:50 PM.. Reason: added differentiation
Old 1 week ago
  #3
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JCBigler's Avatar
Anyone know if the Canon or Nikon mirrorless cameras have this silent feature also? I love my Canon 60D, but I’m sure the shutter noise would be way too loud to use during any recording session. And this would actually give me a reason to consider adding a mirrorless camera. (Like any of us need a legitimate excuse to buy more gear. . )
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
Generally when you set a mirrorless camera to silent shutter, it means the camera is using an electronic shutter in which a signal is passed starting at one corner running across each line of the sensor to the bottom corner. If you have flicker in the lighting, you can sometimes see a banding effect in the overall photo caused by different parts of the sensor being exposed to different lighting due to the flicker. It pretty much ruins the photo in my experience. Correcting it would mean having to spend valuable time editing each band in the photo to try to achieve some uniformity across the entire photo, and the results probably wouldn't look that great. I don't have the patience to even try.

A DSLR lifts a mirror to expose all of the sensor at once. So no banding and usually no banding using the mechanical shutter on a mirrorless camera, but then you have the mechanical shutter noise which varies from model to model.

In my experience, my mics do a fantastic job of picking up shutter clicks even with an audience present. It can be worse than ever now because so many cameras will shoot 8-10 FPS.

Canon's CEO forecast that sales of interchangeable lens cameras will fall by 50% over the next two years. We're entering a time of transition in the camera market where Nikon and Canon evidently feel pressured by losing sales to Sony mirrorless and continue to respond with their own offerings. My suggestion is to be very, very careful about buying cameras until things settle a bit more.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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jwh1192's Avatar
now if we can Sync the Shutters to the Beat via wireless .. haha
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Gear Addict
 

I have been doing a considerable amount of shooting of very quiet performances (Renaissance and baroque music, combination Medici-era theater and music, experimental music/theater, and other quiet acoustic ensembles) with a Nikon Z7 and now also a Fujifilm GFX50S, both mirrorless.

While I've been a slow adopter of mirrorless, what they enable has been a revelation in what I can photograph, and how. Events that simply couldn't be photographed due to noise and intrusion can now be documented, because these cameras have dedicated silent shooting modes, using a purely electronic shutter, as mentioned above.

The flip side is dealing with lighting flicker from LEDs and projectors. It can be nightmarish. Luckily, often, those lights tend to be restricted to background, so main subjects still look okay, but it is a very real problem.

Sometimes, if you can figure out the frequency of the LEDs with test shots, and then shoot at that same speed, or a multiple thereof, you can mitigate the problem. But sometimes conditions prohibit shooting at that shutter speed. Having image stabilization in a lens or body, or not having it can make big differences here, and each camera handles lighting differently.

It's a struggle, but worth it, for being able to get good pictures of performances that would not otherwise be photographed.
Old 1 week ago
  #7
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hbphotoav's Avatar
 

I was a photographer-for-money long before I was a location recordist. I've kept some clients (NSO archives from 1984-2014) by learning when to shoot (film cameras and DSLRs) and how to shoot (most current concert stuff is for small-form - magazine publication less than 1/4 page) so good placement, a 70-200/2.8, a Nikon D800 on a solid monopod, and 1080p video, properly exposed, has become my "silent" option since 2012. 24 or 30fps provides decent "peak-of-the-action" capture when the program material doesn't allow for the mirror clack to be covered. I've also learned to stop shooting when the event has sufficient coverage. Then, it's "sit back and enjoy the concert" time. You gotta know when to hold 'em, and know when to shoot 'em.

I'm also waiting for the next iteration of the Z6... love my Nikkor lenses... and I never was a "bleeding edge" guy.

One old owl's experience.

HB

P.S. : Most LED lighting is of Satan. Gimme well-focused 3200K PARs, fresnels and ellipsoidals any day...
Old 1 week ago
  #8
Lives for gear
^I'm curious how many D series lens do you own? None of which will work on the Z6 or Z7 even with the adapter because they eliminated the screw drive.

Nikon also reduced the number of buttons for controlling the Z cameras compared to something like the D800. The Zs have no battery grip and use only one card slot requiring an expensive XQD card. I suspect mirrorless cameras are less expensive to manufacture since there's no mirror mechanism, but they priced the Z7 body at $3547 v. $3100 for the D850 at current prices. And the 50mm f.18 S lens is $597 versus $217 for the G version and $131 for the D series.

I wonder if the major camera manufacturers have this notion that they can be more profitable if they make fewer cameras and lenses with much, much higher profit margins.

Coming back to the main topic, the Fujifilm XH1 has a very quiet shutter mechanism. Currently priced at $1300 with the battery grip, it's a mirrorless camera worth considering if your goal is to photograph a concert quietly using the mechanical shutter without having to worry about banding. But $1300 also buys the full frame Canon RP which allows the use of Canon EF lenses, but which has a battery with something like only a 250 shot rating. I believe it's also a proprietary chipped battery. And back to the one card slot.

Last edited by 2manyrocks; 1 week ago at 12:30 PM..
Old 1 week ago
  #9
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hbphotoav's Avatar
 

Primary lenses are 24-120 f:4 G ED, and VR 70-200 G ED f:2.8. I also carry an old 35-70 2.8 for backup; an ancient manual focus 18mm 3.5 rectilinear, and a 50mm 1.8 for bokeh. Two D800 bodies, SB900, and a new Nissin Di700A for backup (lots of grip'n'grin and cocktail party candids on the corporate stuff). Leitz mini tabletop tripod, 16-bay NiMH charging station, Eneloops, four Nikon chargers, four spare Nikon EN-EL15 batteries. All rides in a LowePro carryon roller. That's been my rig for the past 8 years...
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Lives for gear
Your transition would be easier than mine (9 d series lens plus some Tamrons).

For the benefit of anyone seriously looking at the mirrorless option, Fuji owners have free access to Capture One Express for Fuji and can also buy Capture One Express Pro for Fujifilm for $109 at the moment. I'm not as familiar with its cataloging tools, but the white balance and exposure tools in Capture One are excellent.

The masking tool in the Capture One Pro version also works very well. I had a situation with a conductor being lit by one set of lighting with a different color temp than the background lighting and was able to easily balance the white balance with the masking tool.

Sadly, no Capture One discounts for Nikon owners at the moment.

Fuji's use of a shutter speed dial + command wheel and the battery common to it's ASPC line--I wish they'd change that when they update the XH1 to the XH2.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
^I'm curious how many D series lens do you own?
None. I mostly use pre-AI/AI/AI-S all manual lenses, or more modern AF-S G lenses, or the new S 24-70.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
Nikon also reduced the number of buttons for controlling the Z cameras compared to something like the D800.
I am mildly vexed by this on occasion, but get by. I also shoot a D500, for context, mainly for birds and other wildlife.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
The Zs have no battery grip...
For me, irrelevant. Smaller and lighter is better.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
...only one card slot requiring an expensive XQD card.
The 'only one' card slot is, for me, an irrelevant complaint.

I got a free card included with the camera. It works great. No complaints.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
I suspect mirrorless cameras are less expensive to manufacture since there's no mirror mechanism, but they priced the Z7 body at $3547 v. $3100 for the D850 at current prices.
I agonized between the two. For me, the extra money for the Z7 buys A LOT more flexibility across all features sets, and most of the oft-heard complaints in digital internet photography land are anywhere from irrelevant to ridiculous. Yes, the AF is slower. I don't care at all. I'm taking the best digital pictures of my life with this and the MF Fuji.

Moreover, for shooting all manual lenses--as I do most of the time--it's no contest. The Z7 is leagues ahead of the D850.

If I really need speed above all else, I use the D500. I shot a bunch of pictures of wrens on it just this morning. It was great!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
And the 50mm f.18 S lens is $597 versus $217 for the G version and $131 for the D series.
The S is a superior lens optically. For its performance, the price feels fair.
Old 1 week ago
  #12
Lives for gear
^ if you don't mind, what software are you using to edit your Z7 and Fuji files?
Old 6 days ago
  #13
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
^ if you don't mind, what software are you using to edit your Z7 and Fuji files?
Lightroom.
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