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new room tuning software from Rode
Old 26th January 2018
  #1
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new room tuning software from Rode

For those here who routinely need to perform room tuning/analysis (perhaps you're setting up a PA as well as recording).... this might be of interest (Mac based only): FuzzMeasure - RODETEST
Another Rode empire-building acquisition..... YouTube

An interesting spin-off could be the upcoming new Rode measurement mic, typically these have ruler flat responses...but maybe don't shine so brightly in the self-noise dept. ?

Last edited by studer58; 26th January 2018 at 10:37 AM..
Old 26th January 2018
  #2
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JCBigler's Avatar
I saw that earlier. The price looks attractive, but even at half the cost, it's going to be hard to compete with Smaart and a decent pair of Earthworks M23/M30s.

Also, if that mic at the beginning of the video is the new measurement mic, it looks a little big for measurement duties.

And no Windows client is a deal breaker for a lot of people.
Old 27th January 2018
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCBigler View Post
Also, if that mic at the beginning of the video is the new measurement mic, it looks a little big for measurement duties.

And no Windows client is a deal breaker for a lot of people.
Agreed...if doesn't look like the business end of a camera used to investigate the innards of the human body, it isn't a true measurement mic !

Yes Rode should definitely outsource the code-rewriting to get Win users onboard....they are losing a lot of potential users in neglecting that
Old 19th May 2019
  #4
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What happend to this, anyone seen any test mics from røde?
Old 20th May 2019
  #5
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dsp for correction (after analysis)

fuzzmeasure has been around for quite some time; didn't know it got sold to/bought by rode...

regarding measurement mics: self noise for frequency and phase measurements isn't much of an issue; it's about linearity and frequency range (or very rarely about max. spl before clipping).

the main thing (and the most tricky part) though is the interpretation of measurement data and how to make best use of the dsp for correction (and for some folks, what the dsp can do or cannot do...)

my setup is a b&k 4007 (or multiple 4007's for multiple measurement positions in large venues), sometimes via wireless transmitters, into madiface xt (or additional preamps), smaart running on a mac air, anonther mac air running windows to control a lake lm44 (or dlp or a bunch of lake processors): i'll take this setup almost anywhere - if the lake doesn't get used for studio speaker or pa alignment, it's quite helpful on inserts (for sophisticated alignment of spot mics or to have some control over a vocal mic of a singer walking in front of a large pa...)

PLEASE don't refer to 'room correction': it's about frequency response/time alignment/phase coherency!




p.s. if someone is into serious amounts of tweaking, check out this:

https://newton.outline.it/control.html

your choice what to use in front of it/for analysis: fm looks quite nice actually!

Last edited by deedeeyeah; 20th May 2019 at 10:17 AM.. Reason: edited and p.s. added
Old 20th May 2019
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCBigler View Post
I saw that earlier. The price looks attractive, but even at half the cost, it's going to be hard to compete with Smaart and a decent pair of Earthworks M23/M30s.
Smaart starts at 500$ onwards. Not sure why something for 99$ wouldn't be interesting. Also Smaart doesn't do waterfall and EDT measurements.

That said Rode has increated FM's price significantly since they bought it.

FM is very nice. Pretty much like REW but much nicer interface and less cluttered or lets say "ugly Java nerdy" style. Below the line you can do the same things (and more) with REW for free but FM is **much** easier to get started with.

Smaart is great for live IR and transfer function but not to find room issues like reverb time over frequency etc. it's more a tool to calibrate a given system not so much to measure room acoustics.
Old 21st May 2019
  #7
This stuff is like pushing down ping-pong balls in water with your thumb. I had some of the best "tune" LA control rooms. It worked pretty good if you bolted down the mixing chair and taped your head to a 2x4.

Move 2 inches and it all changed.
Old 21st May 2019
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
This stuff is like pushing down ping-pong balls in water with your thumb. I had some of the best "tune" LA control rooms. It worked pretty good if you bolted down the mixing chair and taped your head to a 2x4.

Move 2 inches and it all changed.
this stuff is pretty efficient: if sound changes every two inches, it's the acoustic design which is poor or the speakers: dsp does not mess up sound in such a weird way! it can do a lot of things but not this...
Old 22nd May 2019
  #9
Try it and hear it for yourself. Control rooms are full of nulls and peaks. Measure your room, take an hour with the room EQ's and then move that mic two inches. Be prepared to start all over again.
Old 22nd May 2019
  #10
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well, it's part of what i'm doing... - my experience regarding the use of dsp seems to be vastly different: i'm running my lake dsp's in all my five studios, use it with temporary setups for location recording, for adjusting large pa systems etc.

it's true that measurements prior to eq alignments needs to get averaged from several points in the room, usually a
within the listening area. but moving a few inches should not make much of a difference or else the acoustic design of the room is very poor (or the speakers have a very small dispersion); small rooms are much more difficult to get them sound right over larger area (or at all...)

what you experience (no doubt about that) cannot come from dsp; there is no algorithm which could be responsible for what you're describing - it's gotta be how the speakers react in a specific room.
Old 22nd May 2019
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Try it and hear it for yourself. Control rooms are full of nulls and peaks. Measure your room, take an hour with the room EQ's and then move that mic two inches. Be prepared to start all over again.
It is trivial with SMAART to take dozens of measurements in different spots and create an average from them. You could do 40 measurements across everywhere the engineer is likely to be while mixing in twenty minutes with a single mic.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dasbin View Post
It is trivial with SMAART to take dozens of measurements in different spots and create an average from them. You could do 40 measurements across everywhere the engineer is likely to be while mixing in twenty minutes with a single mic.
With the right audio interface, and enough mics, you can do it all at the same time. Takes about 2 seconds to take 40 measurements. Will take hours to get all the mics cables and set up and gained properly.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dasbin View Post
It is trivial with SMAART to take dozens of measurements in different spots and create an average from them. You could do 40 measurements across everywhere the engineer is likely to be while mixing in twenty minutes with a single mic.
Yeah but that doesn't mean your sound will be the same in every listening spot. As with all statistics an average person is likely to be non-existent in reality ;-)
Old 4 weeks ago
  #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apple-q View Post
Yeah but that doesn't mean your sound will be the same in every listening spot. As with all statistics an average person is likely to be non-existent in reality ;-)
you're missing the point of averaging: a room usually doesn't show much difference between measuring points close to the listening position (or it needs to be treated) but also, it's not about emulating mr. average's hearing capability, it's about correction minor fr issues so the listening experience remains largely the same over a wider area or gets optimized for a very specific position.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JCBigler View Post
With the right audio interface, and enough mics, you can do it all at the same time. Takes about 2 seconds to take 40 measurements. Will take hours to get all the mics cables and set up and gained properly.
use a single mic with a wireless transmitter - and no, gain isn't an issue (unless your room is very large/measuring positions are very distant from the speakers)
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