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Video cameras Condenser Microphones
Old 10th October 2018
  #61
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Yannick's Avatar
 

I currently own a Panasonic GX80, which does a great job when shooting in 4K and then exporting as 1080p.

As I have 2-3 very good lenses (had an ancient m43 photocamera as well), I am looking into the 1300 dollar Blackmagic pocket cinema 4K (which has a free Resolve copy included !).

It shoots unlimited,continuous (its a camera), it has prores & raw (soon blackmagic braw), and you can connect a cheap Samsung T5 USB3 1-2TB harddisc, and record straight to that.

As a bonus, it has very good lowlight performance as well.

The price makes it a no-brainer for high-quality concert shooting (on tripods, it has no stabilisation).

For the price of a GH5S, you buy two of them, it has at least equal video performance (color will be better), and better codec.

Old 10th October 2018
  #62
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I wonder if the m4/3 format is going to be with us 5 or 10 years from now or if the full frame and crop sensor cameras from Nikon, Canon, Fuji, and Sony are going to crush the m4/3 format. That's something to keep in mind before spending a lot on m4/3 bodies and lens.
Old 10th October 2018
  #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
I wonder if the m4/3 format is going to be with us 5 or 10 years from now or if the full frame and crop sensor cameras from Nikon, Canon, Fuji, and Sony are going to crush the m4/3 format. That's something to keep in mind before spending a lot on m4/3 bodies and lens.
Maybe. But smallness, unlimited recording, high battery life and IBS in the MFT cameras will make them last. Full frame is also tech posturing a little I think. Even Panasonic have announced a FF camera, but the GH5, GH5s, GH4 are very capable cameras. Also the BMPCC 4k and the Micro 4k have MFT mounts. Most controlled video shoots have plenty of light.
Old 10th October 2018
  #64
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jnorman's Avatar
Overheating in FF sensors is still a problem for long video sessions. MFT does not have this problem.
Old 10th October 2018
  #65
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I also think MFT is going to be around for quite a while. Panasonic and Olympus (and Leica) continue to develop new lenses and new cameras. And lenses from most other common mounts (except Sony E-mount) can be used on MFT cameras with adapters. You can buy a MFT camera like the BMD Pocket 4K and never actually use a MFT lens on it -- you can use PL-mount cinema lenses, Nikon lenses, Canon lenses, Zeiss lenses, and Leica lenses on it, among others, plus lots of vintage glass.
Old 11th October 2018
  #66
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
I wonder if the m4/3 format is going to be with us 5 or 10 years from now or if the full frame and crop sensor cameras from Nikon, Canon, Fuji, and Sony are going to crush the m4/3 format. That's something to keep in mind before spending a lot on m4/3 bodies and lens.
In addition to the overheating problems and such, there's still lots of banding, rolling shutter, etc effects in the video output of many full-frame cameras. Sony's especially bad with banding artifacts. Some FF, like the new Canon EOS R, are using crop sensors when shooting 4k as well and perform considerably worse than a pannie gh5 family camera in many situations. Maybe 5 years from now the full frames will be there, but at the moment that's not where I'd put my money.

For 4k, the GH5S is pretty well optimized in terms of sensor/pixel size, and provides excellent hands-on control of what you need. It reliably does what it's supposed to as well. There's loads of lenses for the system, including plenty with stepless apertures, etc. You really need to step up to a considerably higher price bracket to do much better. If 8k video becomes mainstream, though, "all bets are off."
Old 11th October 2018
  #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
I'd suggest taking a careful look at the new Fuji XT-3, particularly if you are outputting to a Ninja.
Here is a review of sorts.
YouTube

But it is actually a much more sterling endorsement of the camera that actually filmed this review. Guess which camera he's using?
Old 11th October 2018
  #68
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For music-related stuff, I use a pair of GH5. Otherwise, Leica M.
Old 11th October 2018
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Spearritt View Post
Here is a review of sorts.
YouTube

But it is actually a much more sterling endorsement of the camera that actually filmed this review. Guess which camera he's using?
It would have been tough to make a video of himself using the XT3 if he had used the XT3 to make the video.

Comparison summary begins at 13:40: YouTube

and also: YouTube direct comparison of GH5 v XT3.

Generally, the criticisms appear to be the internal battery life and lack of a rotating flip out screen, and the internal video recording life is limited to 30 minutes. http://www.fujifilm.com/products/dig...talogue_01.pdf It looks like there may be a way to use an external power bank, but I'm not clear on that just yet.

Some of the the strengths would be the quick and accurate AF, the larger sensor, and to my eye, color rendition, not to mention Fuji's dial controls and build quality.
Old 11th October 2018
  #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oudplayer View Post
In addition to the overheating problems and such, there's still lots of banding, rolling shutter, etc effects in the video output of many full-frame cameras. Sony's especially bad with banding artifacts. Some FF, like the new Canon EOS R, are using crop sensors when shooting 4k as well and perform considerably worse than a pannie gh5 family camera in many situations. Maybe 5 years from now the full frames will be there, but at the moment that's not where I'd put my money.

For 4k, the GH5S is pretty well optimized in terms of sensor/pixel size, and provides excellent hands-on control of what you need. It reliably does what it's supposed to as well. There's loads of lenses for the system, including plenty with stepless apertures, etc. You really need to step up to a considerably higher price bracket to do much better. If 8k video becomes mainstream, though, "all bets are off."
Nicely put.

I'm a long time GH4 user; slowly getting ready to upgrade, but will get the GH5(non-S) as I shoot with a lot of vintage lenses and would appreciate the in-body stabilization.

I know I'm not the first person to rue the omission of that feature from the S model, but rue it I shall.
Old 25th October 2018
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradh View Post
When this was released "Sleepwalking in the Rift" a film directed by Cary Fukunaga for Maiyet on Vimeo some video and film DoPs speculated that it was shot on a film camera or an Alexa. In fact it was shot on a Canon 5D circa 2008. That's a full-frame camera versus MFT on the GH5 so not really a fair comparison, but the 5D wasn't all that much more expensive. And the cameras that people thought this film came from cost tens of thousands of dollars.

A few people did call it correctly. But the point is that it fooled some experts, and more importantly it didn't matter. It's a beautiful film. If your client and 99% of your audience think it looks and sounds great, does it really matter what the 1% who criticize technical aspects of the image think?
The 5D is a professional V DSLR, and even today is pretty much the benchmark in its class. As you yourself mention, it’s full frame and not a fair comparison to a micro four thirds. Also, just because some famous DPs shot a video with it and it looks beautiful, that doesn’t equate to creating content on the cheap. How expensive were the lenses used in that video? Professional fast glass?

Regardless, this debate was about comparing a four thousand dollar microphone to a four hundred dollar camera. It’s idiotic either way you sum it up. Sure, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Or the ear. BecUse the same argument could be made for using a two hundred dollar mic over a pro studio version
Old 1st November 2018
  #72
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New video from Tony Northrup in which he offers his personal opinions on why the m4/3 format may be on the way out: YouTube

The core of his view appears to be that smartphones have severely undermined camera sales at the lower end of the camera market causing manufacturers to compete for the higher end of the camera market. He states that sensor manufacturing costs have declined to the point that full frame and crop sensor cameras can now be had for less than the price of some m4/3 cameras, and then he discusses his own experience with m4/3 noise versus full frame cameras and what all of this may mean for the future of m4/3 format sales when that share of the market appears to be declining.

There are some camera sales charts that show the decline in overall camera sales, and the rise of Sony's share of the full frame market in 2017-2018. My personal speculation is that Panasonic looked at the sales charts and this influenced their decision to bring a full frame camera to market. Similarly, Nikon and Canon must have been looking at the same trends and decided to bring their own full frame mirrorless cameras to market to try to hold on to their customer base against Sony.

Fujifilm differentiated itself by improving its crop sensor mirrorless camera to maintain its position in that market, but bypassed full frame entirely to offer medium format cameras essentially leaving the other manufacturers to fight in the full frame market.
Old 1st November 2018
  #73
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king2070lplaya's Avatar
I've just put together a rig of Lumix GX85's, which will run for the length of the card or the battery in 4k.

I use them with a dummy battery and 15600 Anker chargers, as the stock batteries are very small and there are no grip options. A stock battery will last about an hour shooting 4k.

I'm currently using them with dummy adapters and my old Nikkor AI and Tamron Adaptall lens collection, as AF isn't really a necessary feature for the kind of work we're talking about. The built-in stabilization makes this a feasable solution, which it wouldn't really be on cameras without it. The glass also looks amazing on the little panny sensor, which is a big plus for me.

But I've used the Lumix 2.8 zooms (12-35, 35-100) in the past, as well as Canon stabilized zoom lenses on speedboosters, and those would all be good all-in-one solutions as well.

For the price and quality, the GX85 cannot be beat. I picked both of mine up for around 350 a piece. They punch way above their belt, better looking than a GH4 by about a stop and sharper in general. GH5 probably looks a little bit better, yeah, and has a bit better low light performance. Once you get to talking about FF sensors, LOGs, and cinema cameras the results improve dramatically, but unless you're picking up a C100 or C200 or equivalent, you're going to need an external recorder for uninterrupted shooting, and so any of those options are around 1000% or more expensive. I'll put that money I saved into mics.

Last edited by king2070lplaya; 1st November 2018 at 07:39 PM..
Old 1st November 2018
  #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post
I've just put together a rig of Lumix GX85's, which will run for the length of the card or the battery in 4k.

...For the price and quality, the GX85 cannot be beat. I picked both of mine up for around 350 a piece. They punch way above their belt, better looking than a GH4 by about a stop and sharper in general. GH5 probably looks a little bit better, yeah, and has a bit better low light performance.
Very interesting perspective.

I just recently bought the new Nikon Z7, not primarily for video, but I've been stunned by its performance in this regard, especially using the many classic pre-AI/AI/AIS lenses I own. Suddenly, being able to shoot full frame 4k is a reality for me. 10bit too, once I get an external recorder.

This morning, for the first time, the thought occurred to me that I might sell my GH4 and leave M43 altogether, but having an inexpensive M43 camera like the GX85 sure seems appealing for, say, a long, static master shot, where absolute image quality isn't necessarily a first priority.

You really think the image quality is on par with the GH4? I was happy with my GH4 images, and was planning to upgrade soon to the GH5...but this Z7 has me thinking now about just simplifying.


Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post

...I'll put that money I saved into mics.
Amen to that!
Old 1st November 2018
  #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post
Once you get to talking about FF sensors, LOGs, and cinema cameras the results improve dramatically, but unless you're picking up a C100 or C200 or equivalent, you're going to need an external recorder for uninterrupted shooting, and so any of those options are around 1000% or more expensive.
The new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is only about $1,300, takes MFT lenses (or a huge variety of other lenses using adapters, including Nikon, Canon, Zeiss, PL mount, Leica, just about anything except Sony e-mount lenses) and can save files on an SSD. The image quality and dynamic range are excellent. Apparently the mini-XLR input has a good preamp (I saw one review where a person tested it against his Sound Devices MixPre 3 and could hear no difference in noise or sound quality) although the 3.5mm input jack is noisy and should be avoided.
Old 1st November 2018
  #76
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king2070lplaya's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by pieter k View Post

You really think the image quality is on par with the GH4? I was happy with my GH4 images, and was planning to upgrade soon to the GH5...but this Z7 has me thinking now about just simplifying.
For perspective, the GH4 was my main camera for a few years, and I would say the GX85 is superior in the following ways: I think the removal of the antialiasing filter from the 16mp sensor made a big difference in terms of the level of detail that could be resolved through the lens, and the processor seems to do a better job translating in low light. I never wanted to shoot the GH4 above about ISO 1000-1250, with this camera I get comparable noise levels starting at about 2000, and the detail is retained further that the GH4, to where I would be comfortable shooting a wide at around 3200 if I knew I could denoise later.

The GX85 has the benefit of being a newer camera in the digital era, where a spending year or two in time can improve quality more than spending $1000 in money; that said it is certainly built to a price point. Features were compromised, but seemingly not where it really matters to get a good image. Compared to Fuji and Sony offerings, the viewfinder and back screen are notably inferior, But they do still accurately show you your exposure, focus, and composition, so for me this is far from a practical necessity or a dealbreaker. It isn't weather sealed, and time will tell how it holds up under the duress of regular and frequent use (GH4 was a workhorse in this respect).

For a B camera, I'd definitely recommend trying it out. Buy it used, sell it if you don't like it, not much risk there. And since there are so many adapting options for m43, I'd recommend just using your current lineup of glass.
Old 1st November 2018
  #77
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king2070lplaya's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradh View Post
The new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is only about $1,300, takes MFT lenses (or a huge variety of other lenses using adapters, including Nikon, Canon, Zeiss, PL mount, Leica, just about anything except Sony e-mount lenses) and can save files on an SSD. The image quality and dynamic range are excellent. Apparently the mini-XLR input has a good preamp (I saw one review where a person tested it against his Sound Devices MixPre 3 and could hear no difference in noise or sound quality) although the 3.5mm input jack is noisy and should be avoided.
I'd be interested how it compares in terms of low light performance, and also how the recording format changes (specifically whether it lengthens or shortens) the workflow in postproduction, and whether those comparisons warrant the increased price for the kind of work I'm being asked to do.

We had an URSA Mini 4.6k at the last place I worked for about a week, but it didn't stand up under low light like even a GH4 could and was replaced with a 5D MKIV (this seems to be a common issue with cinema cameras designed for well/intentionally lit stages and scenes, even expensive ones like RED's). When recording on stages in venues where I often have little to no control over the lighting, this is a major concern for me. Hopefully Blackmagic have been able to improve on this aspect of their cameras.
Old 1st November 2018
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post
I'd be interested how it compares in terms of low light performance, and also how the recording format changes (specifically whether it lengthens or shortens) the workflow in postproduction, and whether those comparisons warrant the increased price for the kind of work I'm being asked to do.
The new Pocket 4K has a "dual native" ISO that enables low-light shooting with minimal noise (unlike the original Pocket which was lousy in low light). See Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K - Dual ISO Explained and Lowlight Footage | cinema5D and also some of the gallery samples at Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera – Gallery | Blackmagic Design that tested the camera under low light conditions.

For the recording format changes, I think the biggest news on that front is BRAW (Blackmagic RAW), which will be coming to the Pocket 4K at some point fairly soon via a firmware update. That allows you to shoot raw cinema footage in a very efficient codec that takes a lot less space and is less GPU intensive to process than traditional raw formats.
Old 1st November 2018
  #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by king2070lplaya View Post
For perspective, the GH4 was my main camera for a few years, and I would say the GX85 is superior in the following ways:...

For a B camera, I'd definitely recommend trying it out. Buy it used, sell it if you don't like it, not much risk there. And since there are so many adapting options for m43, I'd recommend just using your current lineup of glass. And since there are so many adapting options for m43, I'd recommend just using your current lineup of glass.
Thank you very much for the thoughtful insight.

Before yesterday, none of this would have crossed my mind. But with the sudden advantages the Nikon is allowing, it has me rethinking now. It's not the right camera for workhorse, production use, but that's not the kind of work I do anyway.

I do like the GH4 a lot, and have intended to upgrade to the GH5, for improved image quality and especially the IBIS. Luckily, I only ever bought one native M43 lens--the 12mm-35mm, which I almost never use. The big limitation with the format is wide angle shooting. My widest prime is a 15mm Voigtlander M-mount, but it's slow. I've long looked at Voigtlanders f.95 lenses, but have a hard time spending the money on a native M43 lens, when I have a whole cabinet full of wonderful Nikon, Contax, Zeiss, Leica, Canon, and a few other primes, antique to recent, with adapters for them all.

Now, with the Nikon, the wide angle struggle is gone.

So I don't know...I'm still interested in a GH5, but maybe your suggestion is the way forward. As you said, it's inexpensive.

Again, thank you for an eye-opening idea!

EDIT: I just remembered one enormously important aspect of the GH4/5 design: the flip out/rotatable LCD. That's really important.

Hmm.
Old 2nd November 2018
  #80
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In the YT video I linked, Northrup seemed to me to suggest that adapting full frame lens to m4/3 have advantages in light gathering and bokeh relative to native m4/3 lens. If you already have good lens, the m4/3 adapters aren't expensive.

However, I just did a comparison of an Olympus 75mm f1.8 m4/3 lens against an adapted Minolta 50mm f1.4, and the Olympus was super sharp.

On the Z7, I think Nikon shot itself in the foot by changing the lens mount such that existing F mount lens either won't mount without using their adapter and evidently some D series lens won't even autofocus with the adapter. One of the reasons for buying Nikon is the number of available F mount lens, but Nikon went down the wrong road on the Z mount, not to mention using the XQD card that is expensive, IMO. It's my opinion that the Z mount is even more of a mistake than the XQD when it comes to fending off Sony taking Nikon customers.
Old 2nd November 2018
  #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2manyrocks View Post
On the Z7, I think Nikon shot itself in the foot by changing the lens mount such that existing F mount lens either won't mount without using their adapter and evidently some D series lens won't even autofocus with the adapter. One of the reasons for buying Nikon is the number of available F mount lens, but Nikon went down the wrong road on the Z mount, not to mention using the XQD card that is expensive, IMO. It's my opinion that the Z mount is even more of a mistake than the XQD when it comes to fending off Sony taking Nikon customers.
Have you been able to spend time shooting with the Z7, and one or two of the new lenses?
Old 2nd November 2018
  #82
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Sorry, but no. Among other reasons, I lost interest in the Z series when I saw that my D lens weren't going to autofocus on the Z bodies. I might have bitten on one of the D850s if they had any in stock, but I'm leaning towards waiting to see if Nikon will adopt CF express cards instead of Sony's XQD which I personally suspect will eventually go the way of betamax tape.

And...it did not make any sense to me that Nikon would tout the Z mount as capable of f.951 lenses, but then release the Z series with two f1.8s and one f4 in focal lengths already well covered by the D and G series. And then there is the yet to be determined question whether f.951 lens, with such a thin depth of field, are going to be that practical when it comes to locking focus.

Last edited by 2manyrocks; 2nd November 2018 at 02:52 AM..
Old 2nd November 2018
  #83
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The question for me is to line up the various FF and 4/3 offerings in the sub 3K price point and try to establish an objective pro/con consensus for shooting live music performance. Most reviews cover portrait capability, athletic events, documentaries and architectural wide angle photo detail. Several years ago I bought a GH3 with a 12-35mm 2.8 lens and added an Atomos blade recorder later. I will be adding a second rig to do a better job of capturing close ups of leads. Given the fact that my work on stages with more than ample light for my existing rig I plan to add a GH5 with a Lumix 35-100 mm 2.8 lens with a new Atomos Ninja V recorder. Since the close ups will need to be attended, unlike my current full band fixed capture, the improved imaging of the GH5 should be important.
I am not a fan of mixing and matching various brand elements within a camera rig that is done for various reasons. I am far more comfortable sticking with an optimized system that has been carefully designed and assembled to deliver an end product from start to finish.
Too this end, Mats has done some real high quality work with multiple Black magic cameras.
Hugh
Old 2nd November 2018
  #84
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Your situation is a question of return on investment in a depreciating asset. Even making the assumption that m4/3 is here to stay, today's camera body will lose value as new bodies are released. I saw used excellent condition GH3s listed for under $400 recently compared to a release price of $1,300 in 2012. If a GH5 enables you to recover your investment plus your desired financial return, then staying within the same GH family means you sort of know what you're getting and you don't have to learn a new system that may have different color grading. At least the GH5 is currently on sale for $1,700.

If you didn't already have any investment in the Panasonic system, you might reach other business conclusions.

My caution is simply that I think we are seeing a shift in the overall DSLR/Mirrrorless/Video market and it may be reflected in Panasonic's decision to reduce the price of the GH5. Long term, is m4/3 viable? The answer may not matter to you if you can make money today with m4/3.

Going back to the Z for a second, it doesn't make sense to me that Nikon plans to release a 58mm f.95 manual focus lens rumored at a release price of $6,000 for the Z mount camera. The price of that lens alone is more than the new Fuji medium format camera including a 45mm autofocus lens for $5,200.
Old 2nd November 2018
  #85
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2manyrocks, I certainly can identify with your assessment of the potential fast moving market value of the 4/3rds cameras and for that matter most all cameras. I have a like new Nikon N5005 film camera with a 28-70 lens that has little or no value. I gave a $6,000. 24 channel A&H 2800 series console to a small local baptist church because the tax deduction was bigger than the realistic secondary mkt. value. They both died a mkt. death from obsolescence. 4/3rds cameras became a big success because their price point and the fact that FF cameras had several problems functioning well in a video world. At some point, if you are right in your assumption of future obsolescence, then they too will become "old and in the way": however that is not the case today. You are correct in the fact that I am already vested in the GH Atomos protocol and for the record very pleased with the video it produces. I am 77 years old and have been working in and around most all endeavors in live SR and studio production for more than 50 years. At this point in the final chapters of my work life my only concern is the quality of the work I produce and too this end inter-net video has replaced audio recordings as a marketing tool for my clientele. I could give a rats ass about the potential long term future value and relevance of 4/3rds cameras as long as they do a good job for me today. The market share reasons pan and other 4/3 leaders are releasing FF models is not much of a concern for me.
Hugh
Old 2nd November 2018
  #86
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Familiarity with the tools you are already using to get the results you want has great value. It would be a recurring headache to mix in another camera system that has different visuals that would never quite mesh seamlessly together.
Old 2nd November 2018
  #87
The Blackmagic Pocket 4k is so new most of the numerous pre-orders haven’t been delivered yet.
Most of the online bloggers I’ve seen claiming m4/3rds is about to disappear are photography bloggers.
M4/3rds in the shape of Blackmagic and Panasonic has never been more popular.
Old 2nd November 2018
  #88
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On the video side, the GH5 still has the advantage of unlimited recording time and the benefit of having been refined over 4 prior GH generations. But on the photography side, the $1,700 price point is above some full frame cameras. Sensor size still matters when processing photos.

It might be worthwhile to look at these sales graphs showing the growth of full frame mirrorless cameras and Sony's share of those sales: Camera Sales: Sony and transition to Full Frame - Personal View Talks

Last edited by 2manyrocks; 2nd November 2018 at 11:20 PM.. Reason: add link
Old 4 weeks ago
  #89
Not sure if the OP is still around, but I'll chime in here, since I stuck my toe into the "video on the cheap" capability a few years back, and perhaps OP can benefit from my own lessons learned.

1 - Tried the GoPro first - just wanted to be able to have something in my bag to clamp to the mic stand. Its wide angle lens made its usefulness limited, and it suffered from overheating and battery-life issues. It could not record more than 45 minutes on a single battery, even though the card could go all day. All the accessories cost money (like a screen, so you could see what you are actually shoooting), so by the time all was said and done, a $300 camera cost more than twice that. Here is a little clip which used that camera, a Hero3:
YouTube

The original footage looks a bit better - this was edited in iMovie (sorry!) and crunched down to 720p before being uploaded to YouTube (and God only knows what their processing did to it).

After being disappointed overall with the results, I went shopping for something a little better. At the time, the Panasonic GH3 was brand new, and the AC90 was also recently released. I initially intended to buy both and return one, but seeing the advantages of each, I ended up keeping both. Here's my take.

The GH3 was designed for video, and there are no record-length limitations. I've never had any trouble with overheating or battery life - I could probably shoot 4 or 5 hours on a single charge without sweating. Of course, this was in the days of 1080p, so that is what it is. It takes wonderful still images too; and offers a great deal of control over the image, as do most cameras in this form factor. With the f2.8 12/35 Lumix lens, it has yielded sharp and clear images in all but the lowest light. Here's a recent example (again, crunched down to 720p and smashed by YouTube, but you get an idea) shot nearly in the dark, but with the f2.8 35/100 lens, which is not quite as sharp:
YouTube

It's small and lightweight, so easy to carry along and not too obtrusive.

My issue with these types of cameras is that they are not well suited to live concert use. Unless you have plenty of time to setup, frame, and focus the shot before rolling (the latter being über-important shooting in low light - being off by just a fraction on a wide-aperture lens can be a disaster wrt focus), it's not conducive to a scenario where things might be at various distances and depths throughout the show. Also, the lack of a clean HDMI output precludes the use of it for live streaming or recording to external devices.

I really would recommend a real camcorder (like the AC90), with rings for exposure and focus, servo zoom, XLR inputs, and a clean HDMI out. I have to say, dollar-for-dollar, the AC90 has been the better investment, even though the footage is not quite as artful or beautiful as the GH3. It enables me to make better transitions on the fly, is more forgiving wrt focus and depth-of-field (since it has three smaller chips instead of one large one), and can take in the audio from my rig, which enables me to do live streaming with decent sound, and/or I can feed the camera and hand off the SD card if the client really needs a fast turnaround. Here are two things shot with this camera, not holding any of this up as good camera work (it's not), but just as a contrast:
YouTube

and a recent live stream, which really was shot in the dark (music starts about 11 - 15 minutes in):
Brooklyn Art Song Society - American Iconoclasts II. Samuel Barber | Facebook[0]=68.ARDzEqM8BB6AF3WeV3ROk-5_R7acpmT8pDbr-uyFkWWrpMLvOEJygr6sZd-9673rZJ04ktZ8zCrPEQkrV7z50asR4D7YVZNrKLWrRYLFnG_-20ouj8dOIaR8KUirkTLnE0BraET7O7w8LAAIK6AJRNtvzQIzIcKmzEnaMB1zIhw1Mr2P4hosLPSiDEiFPogbGBH_2y9jf2ACYzh75ui0D1YVFXWV6TCZzPPmNUbAQtM&__tn__=HHH-R
Old 4 weeks ago
  #90
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jimjazzdad's Avatar
Rob, great summary for the uninitiated (like me!). Thanks for taking the time to post this, along with examples.
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