The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
Tags: , , , , , ,

What's your favorite way to record live? Recorders, Players & Tape Machines
View Poll Results: What's your favorite way to record live?
Analog recorders (2", 1", 1/2", 1/4", audiocassette)
10 Votes - 4.67%
Digital recorders (DASH, ADAT, DTRS, DAT, etc, etc)
32 Votes - 14.95%
Hard disk recorders (RADAR, X48, HD24XR, MX2424, etc, etc)
87 Votes - 40.65%
DAW (PT and all the rest of the computer based rigs)
85 Votes - 39.72%
Voters: 214. You may not vote on this poll

Old 21st January 2003
  #31
Han
Lives for gear
 

I happen to have a Tascam MSR24S which is transportable, it fits in any car and it sounds very good. Bought it new and it never has given no problem at all.
Old 13th April 2003
  #32
Gear Maniac
 

When recording live i like to record to HD but, i always back it up with a DTRS set up.

Then I back up the system's HD to a portable firewire drive and once i dump it to the system i'm gonna work on i can release the information on the original HD. The DTRS stock stays on the shelf unless its needed.
Old 20th December 2005
  #33
Here for the gear
 

RUSH "LIVE in RIO" Recording

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kooster
I went for the Radar system as my hard disk recording system because of the A to D converters and it's stability. The Radar is built primarily as a recorder with editing capabilities and not as a DAW. Pro tools if fine if you are recording for 2 - 3 minutes at a time. But put it in record for 3 hours and it is usualy not too happy. This past summer I recorded 3 shows for Barry Manilo to ProTools HD and at the end of each 2.5 hour show the system would crash as soon as you hit the stop button. I can't tell you the sinking feeling I had in my stomach each time it happened. Thank heaven Steve Greko of Dream Hire (it was their system) was able to extract all the tracks back at their shop. The great thing about the Radar is that it can record BWF format for easy inport into Pro Tools. I was going to get the MX-2424 but was told by Steve Greko that when you connect two of them together for 48 tracks the unit becomes quirky. I believe the number he used was a 40% failure rate on all MX-2424 rentals. Way too high for my line of work. Again I never record to any hard disk system without a tape back up of some sort.
After saying that...... I am leaving tomorrow for Brazil to record RUSH in Rio and Sal Paolo onto 48 tracks of (you guessed it) MX-2424. It is what is available on the remote truck down there. I will be backing up on to DA88 also.
Kooster
I bought the "RUSH in RIO" "LIVE" CD and I didn't think it sounded very good at all!! Not necessarily from being recorded on the MX-2424's, but from how it was mixed. With RUSH being a rather "forward-sounding" band, they sounded "way-back" on the "LIVE" CD.

If I had had a chance to mix the show, I would have had the band sound more dry and up-front and BIG, rather than the small sound that's on the CD.

That's my 2-cents worth!!

JBW
Old 21st December 2005
  #34
Lives for gear
 
tenor39's Avatar
 

All DPA mic's>Cranesong Spider>Lynx AES 16>Magma expansion chassis>Laptop running Nuendo w/Masterlink as 2 ch. backup. I can download from the HD in the Magma by FireWire into my mastering system. Simple, reliable, fast setup, great sound! Sorry for the brand-dropping. Merry Christmas, everyone.

Mike
Old 21st December 2005
  #35
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Mike,

Sweet little system you have there!

Have a Merry Happy and a Happy Merry!!
Old 24th December 2005
  #36
Lives for gear
 
opentune's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by midnightblue
I bought the "RUSH in RIO" "LIVE" CD and I didn't think it sounded very good at all!! Not necessarily from being recorded on the MX-2424's, but from how it was mixed.
Been watching the latest RUSH DVD a couple of weeks ago. Altough i
cannot comment the mix/sound very detailed (cheapo HiFi...), i guess
it´s more like you would´ve wanted the RIO DVD to sound.
Check it out!
Old 24th December 2005
  #37
Lives for gear
 
yrplace's Avatar
 

Remote recording deck

I've been using the Genex 48 track hard disk recorder for two years most often w/ DA-78's as backup. The Genex drives can import into Pro-tools, and the unit is much smaller than a pro-tools rig. (runs its own backup drive as well) Without running backup decks and using ATI mic pres I can carry a 48 track setup in my SUV, although we usually use 48 tracks of API and OSA mic pres and a dedicated monitor rack which means we have to truck the gear to the gig.

Glad to hear that members are having good luck using pro-tools rigs live.

Mark Linett
Old 24th December 2005
  #38
Gear Maniac
 
ClickTrackAudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness
Yeah, the SR15 is a key item in every film or teleproduction production we do. We got one in each truck plus a few portable units.

One of our portable racks has an SR15 feeding TC to a Sony TC video burner, a Sony DSR1500, a Tascam DA98HR and DA60MKII.
It's a great way to distribute, reshape, analyze SMPTE TC...

Oh, and the device can strip pilot tone from the TC signal or AC mains....

WHAT? PILOT TONE! WHAT'S THAT? heh heh

...It's some of that old school stuff. heh
LOL...

The SR15 is a staple in our truck as well...having everything slaved off of this makes life just too easy for timecode issues...especially when we have waay too much else to think about.

As for recorders, Radar V (classic) is our primary recording method. The DA-78HR is my next go-to...I love them, but dealing with the maintenance starts to be an issue at times. When they are properly aligned, life is great for the longest time.

Since going to the RADARs they have been our full primary. Depending on track count, we'll typically record redundant on the two RADARS. We can also throw in our DA-78s, an HD-24 or computer into the fray for more redundancy...of course synch becomes more of a ****emare, but it is definitely do-able.

To answer someone else's query, the RADAR Vs can do dual disk recording...simultaneous recording onto two drives. We've used this more as a means to create a client copy rather than redundancy. If I'm going redundant, I prefer to go to an entirely different machine rather than trust it all to one machine. Its not that I don't trust the RADARs, its Murphy that I don't trust.

We just came off of a DVD video shoot where separate redundant machines saved our bacon...a S.U.P (stupid user problem) caused a stop record in the middle of a recording. The redundant system just did its thing and bought us time to fix the problem. Regardless of what you record to, never do a recording without a redundancy!!!
Old 25th December 2005
  #39
Gear Nut
 

DA98HR and DA78HR.
Just had to hire a guy to fill in for me while on a movie and he wanted to use PT instead of my rack, so I warned the producer to have him check all the files before they did any editing. Sure enough the drive was corrupt for the headliner and they lost it all.

My world is all HDTV so NTSC sync is not available. I use an Ambient Clockit box with tri-level sync cross resolved to NTSC sync and timecode to feed the 98HR.
Old 25th December 2005
  #40
Here for the gear
 

HD24 litepiped to my 3 old adats for backup. Transfer to Nuendo via Fireport. Transfer of 2 hr. concert with 24tr takes about an hour. Recording mostly Urban Gospel concerts in Atlanta area churches.
Never had to use the back up tapes in the past 3 yrs.
Old 26th December 2005
  #41
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Clicktrack:

I agree with you, simultaneous recording onto two drives within the same system is a cool thing but, not really a redundant procedure. A completely separate machine is the only way to do backups.

--

Boomed:

Yeah, a well maintained DTRS system is a wonderful way to backup your main recording device. I tend to look at the hard drives as the backup to the DA98HR/DA78HRs during the live recording.

Question: Are you happy with the Ambient Clockit box?

--

Flatrockmobile:

Going from your HD24 to three ADATs via Lightpipe actually isn’t a bona fide backup. If the HD24 or Lightpipe fails you have nothing to fall back on. They must be totally separate systems to consider the second gadget an actual backup. If one rig can take the other one down it’s not a backup!

--
Old 26th December 2005
  #42
Lives for gear
 
Don S's Avatar
 

Santa didn't bring a RADAR! So I'll stick with what I've been using.

1: Mult w/2track. DAW rig. PBG4 running DP or Logic . Fireface. grace pres to Mytek AD. I'll send a 2 track mix out the SDPIF to a CD recorder as a backup.
2: The same setup with DA78's mixed monitored through a board to 2 track CD recorder.
3: Double mult: split the signals and run both!

The setup depends on the show. If it's a classical date then #1. If I'm tracking a jazz, big band, or rock the #2 or 3. Also #3 if the client needs High res. Then the DA78s run at 44.1 and the DAW at 88.2.

I hope this helps.

Don
PS- love the DA78's. Been using Fuji tape and only once had a problem. Some little clicks (digital) showed up for a couple seconds. Quickly removed in the DAW.
Old 1st January 2006
  #43
Gear Nut
 
ARude's Avatar
 

SDR & Sonar

First, Hello! and Happy New Year!

While I'm new here I'm not to the biz...

I have been using a Mackie SDR for almost 3 years now. It has been totally reliable and has the capacity to use large EIDE drives. I use the SDR for capture and then put the disk in my workstation using a compatable drive bay. I then do my editing & mixing in Sonar.

If I need to, my files are compatable with Pro Tools.

I've found this to be the most cost effective package for live capture. The resulting recordings sound great!
Old 1st January 2006
  #44
Gear Head
 

Mark Linett wrote...

Quote:
I've been using the Genex 48 track hard disk recorder for two years most often w/ DA-78's as backup. The Genex drives can import into Pro-tools, and the unit is much smaller than a pro-tools rig. (runs its own backup drive as well) Without running backup decks and using ATI mic pres I can carry a 48 track setup in my SUV, although we usually use 48 tracks of API and OSA mic pres and a dedicated monitor rack which means we have to truck the gear to the gig.
Like Mark, I too use a Genex 48 track (though mine is set-up for 24 tracks of both analog and AES I/O). Currently I am using a heavily mod'ed Tascam MX2424 as back-up machine. Both machines are fed analog inputs from a rack of my own transformerless JFET mic preamps (4 each of the JMP-6 pre's) via multi-channel xlr-to-DB25 y-cords that I made up.

The preamp rack is fed from the direct-hardwire output of my splitter so my preamps provide phantom power where needed. The PA gets the Jensen transformer split with a floating pin #1.

I am planning on dumping the MX2424 for a dual Lynx AES-16 system that will take the digital outputs of from the Genex converters and allow me to go up to a 32 channels track count. While that will not provide as secure a back-up as my current system (you're screwed if the Genex power supply fails), I'm going to give it a try as it will make for a much lighter and more easily transported system. Still, I am a bit nervous about it.

All in all this system works great for me. While I think the converters are pretty good in the Genex machine, I do plan on trying to go to some higher quality external ADC in the near future. I just need enough time to build them. But that wil also provide for a safer, "less eggs in one basket" system.

Cheers and may you all have a happy new year.

Fred Forssell
Old 2nd January 2006
  #45
Gear Maniac
 
ClickTrackAudio's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness
Clicktrack:

I agree with you, simultaneous recording onto two drives within the same system is a cool thing but, not really a redundant procedure. A completely separate machine is the only way to do backups.

.
.
.

Flatrockmobile:

Going from your HD24 to three ADATs via Lightpipe actually isn’t a bona fide backup. If the HD24 or Lightpipe fails you have nothing to fall back on. They must be totally separate systems to consider the second gadget an actual backup. If one rig can take the other one down it’s not a backup!
AMEN!!! I think I posted somewhere else that our redundancy has saved us hugely. Think of it this way...think of your worst gig ever....one where you have been fighting issues from the moment you woke up that morning...think of your mindset as you try to get through the show...now add the stress of "oh crap...the main recorder went down....and it took down the redundant"

That stress is MORE than worth the cost of installing SOME form of separate redundancy.

Most of you know that live is an organized chaos that, on some level, needs some insanity to get into/stay into/continue loving. Do yourself a favour and reduce the amount of chaos wherever you can!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Remoteness
Boomed:

Yeah, a well maintained DTRS system is a wonderful way to backup your main recording device. I tend to look at the hard drives as the backup to the DA98HR/DA78HRs during the live recording.
This raises a question:

I love the DTRS DA78 format. One of the reasons why I've moved away from it as a primary is simply because of Tascam's discontinuation of the DA78...regular maintenance is key to these machines working well and I've been concerned that since they are now not part of the "supported" stable, it'll be come harder to keep the machines in service as time moves forward.

I know that the 98 is still a supported model, so maybe this fear of mine isn't fully warranted. Over time I've seriously thought of restocking the truck with a set of DA-78's, just because they fit our work model so well, but this maintenance issue keeps raising its head in the back of my mind.


I'm curious to know if the discontinuation of the DA78 has affected anyone else's decisions to move forward and/or continue with it?

(And yes...I did note the parallel this thought of mine has with the arguement that many have with themselves over "do I continue with analogue tape"...funny how times change,technology changes, but the same issues still rear their ugly heads!!!)


Cheers,
Click


BTW...Steve...if this is hijacking your original post, feel free to split it off
Old 2nd January 2006
  #46
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
The DTRS DA78HR format has been discontinued for quite some time now but, their support is still there. Mr. Chang is still at Tascam and he has been very helpful for many years now. IMO, he is worth his weight in gold.

Tascam will continue to sell the DA98HR until they're sold out. But, I suspect they will continue to support the DTRS format for at least 7 to 10 years from the day they discontinue them.

I recently sent two DA78HRs to Tascam for repair and they came back up to date and in perfect condition. The repair department is still in business.
Old 2nd January 2006
  #47
Gear Maniac
 
ClickTrackAudio's Avatar
 

Very good to know...

Thanks!

I have one machine that needs some TLC so I'll be sending it in...and knowing that the support should still be there will ease the nagging feeling of sinking more money into the format to keep it up to date.

Cheers!
Old 5th January 2006
  #48
Lives for gear
 
yrplace's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred
Mark Linett wrote...



Like Mark, I too use a Genex 48 track (though mine is set-up for 24 tracks of both analog and AES I/O). Currently I am using a heavily mod'ed Tascam MX2424 as back-up machine. Both machines are fed analog inputs from a rack of my own transformerless JFET mic preamps (4 each of the JMP-6 pre's) via multi-channel xlr-to-DB25 y-cords that I made up.

The preamp rack is fed from the direct-hardwire output of my splitter so my preamps provide phantom power where needed. The PA gets the Jensen transformer split with a floating pin #1.

I am planning on dumping the MX2424 for a dual Lynx AES-16 system that will take the digital outputs of from the Genex converters and allow me to go up to a 32 channels track count. While that will not provide as secure a back-up as my current system (you're screwed if the Genex power supply fails), I'm going to give it a try as it will make for a much lighter and more easily transported system. Still, I am a bit nervous about it.

All in all this system works great for me. While I think the converters are pretty good in the Genex machine, I do plan on trying to go to some higher quality external ADC in the near future. I just need enough time to build them. But that wil also provide for a safer, "less eggs in one basket" system.

Cheers and may you all have a happy new year.

Fred Forssell
Personally I think the Genex A-D converters sound fantastic and are way better than stock Digi-design converters. Not sure I'd want anything more estoteric on a remote as far as converters are concerned.

Mark
Old 3rd November 2006
  #49
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood_steve View Post
Good mics, good preamps and those "horrible" DAT recorders can still equal a decent recording.
It's so stupid to me that people consider dat decks horrible. We're going back to analog and people think DAT is horrible????? High end dat decks of the past are only $100 to $200 now with the best being only $350 or $400 now in 2006 on the used market. I own an sv-3800 with low hours that sounds amazing.

Think about this. In the 1990 everybody mixed to dat. Some people mixed to analog, but EVERYBODY mixed to dat. DAT was THE industry standard mixdown deck, along with some others that often were used simultaneously, but dat was IT.

Every studio recording I made in the 1990s ended up on dat from the studio (earlier than that it ended up on either analog or pcm). the sound of dat is excellent. Don't fret about it. And you can actually still buy extremely high grade dat tape, but you may want to buy it in large quantities since in a couple of years it may become more difficult to find.

But either way, DAT sounds excellent, probably half of the cds you own went through a dat stage and so you're listening to dat quite often without realizing it.

People are so fickle about this stuff it's sad. Like the way people dissed disco, well guess what, it came back with only subtle changes in the late 90s. People hated analog, and it came back big time (with honestly little reason since it's flawed as well, just flawed differently from digital). Personally, while I like the artifacts of analog on some material, I have no problem mixing to DAT and still do to this day sometimes.

DAT is dead in the eye of the manufacturers of dat decks, but hell so are many other technologies that we still use and love to this day. You can't buy new hardware based BBE sonic minimizers but those are used extensively in dance mixes and dj work.

I won't go on with the list, but my point is just that people read something like DAT is DEAD and then think it's got to be awful. It's not, it's excellent, pro level audio and all cds from the 90s that you listen to have existed on dat (at least as a backup in the studio), and many of those went through a dat generation before mastering and you are listening to the "sound" of dat all the time.

Got up on the wrong side of the bed today, I'm feeling better now, no harm intended!

Cheers,
Don
Old 4th November 2006
  #50
I usually record to HD24XR, which sounds fine to me (and better than fine, if the room is good!). Last night I ended up being double booked, well, rather, I got an offer of a good paying gig at the last minute after having a charity case on the books. I had an assistant handle the regular gig on the HD24 and I brought an Octamic D and Grace Lunatec and a MH MIO 2882 +DSP with a Mac Book Pro to the other gig and I was incredibly surprised at how easy it was to transport, set up and run. No issues at all (I had gotten the HD24 because I was tired of dealing with PT LE on location) and it ran at 13% CPU. MIO console is a great way to record although I haven't figured out how to make it play back my tracks.

I'm also running into needing more than 24 channels and have been word clocking the HD24 from the MIO and recording guide tracks on both and syncing up later. A pain, but it works, but now I think that maybe the way to go with a Lightbridge and using the HD 24 as a 24 channel converter and record into Digital Performer. For less than 24 channels, it's also a great way to back up.

With the MBP, I am using an eSATA drive on the express card output and it is great! Makes firewire look like it's standing still.

So, I guess I am voting for stand alone, but maybe moving back to DAW.
Edwin
Old 4th November 2006
  #51
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
Don,

You're right eveyone (well, almost everyone) recorded to DAT back in the day...

But, in any event it's wasn't about what we recorded to -- it was about the a/d converters we used. Standard Dat a/d d/a converters never sounded that good to my ears and to many others.

Even today, we use separate a/d d/a converters to make our recordable media sound as good as we can make it.

When it really matters, I never leave home without outboard converters!
Old 4th November 2006
  #52
Lives for gear
 
yrplace's Avatar
 

I don't like using PT live. I've rented supposedly "bullet proof " systems only to have them crash during the show. PT doesn't save anything until you hit stop so your entire recording is at risk until the show is over.

We record to a pair of Genex 9048s and then copy the files onto a firewire drive and import into Pro-tools. I've had someone kick out the power (we now have a UPS) and the Genex files were easily recoverable which in that cae saved the project as no backup system was possible, Had it been PT we would have lost the first hr of the show.

Depending on the project we also sometimes backup to DA-78 (video folk like that)

Mark Linett
Your Place Or Mine Recording

www.ypomr.com
Old 6th November 2006
  #53
Gear Nut
 

hi,

I'm not as "big" as most of you guys. I do not own a truck or something like that,
Steve(remote) is a big inspiration .
Specially the jazzclub recordings. Thanks for all the tips.


I've done some great(jazz) recordings with 2 2882's and a powerbook recently.
Didn't encounter any problems.
I record in logic and can even make a rough mixsetting instanly, and bounce and burn it after the concert.
When I come to the studio, I can transfer the logicproject very quick in the G5 and mix rightaway.
A bit scary to think that after 16 mics, multicable you go into a small firewire cable.
But It has proven to be trustfull. I do not backup.
Maybe I should be more paranoya. But I'm dutch.
My only condition is that everything has to fit in my stationwagon, and set up real quick.
Could backup with 2 da88's (from somewhere under the dust in my studio)and take my api's but than it wouldn't fit in my stationwagon anymore.
Multicable, stands, and cables take the most space.

Now you've seen my setup, does anyone have suggestions about an alternative way(not as big or heavy) to backup?

Has anyone looked into this ? : (boomrecorder) http://www.vosgames.nl/
I've heard it's very realiable.

greets
Old 6th November 2006
  #54
Lives for gear
 
Gerax's Avatar
 

I use an HDR recorder (Mackie SDR2496) as my main system, feeding it ADAT lines from my preamps/AD converters (just use its digital I/O so converters quality is not an issue). I record on the removable drive I've mounted in the external tray, I've got a pile of drives in those caddies, and each one holds a gig (usually 60 to 80Gb drives are more than enough for 1hr and 1/2 of 24 tracks @ 24/44.1 or 24/48); migration to Pro Tools for editing and mixing is just as easy as powering down and plugging the removable drive in my PT rig back at the studio. I wish the PT session compatibility would be available for SDR too, but it's a discontinued product so I'm left with manually loading the tracks into a session. So far it's been 100% reliable in almost 5 years of use on the road to live gigs, anyway, I've always been backing up to DA78s taking an analog split form the preamps via Dsub-25 cables, because you never know.... The system has been so reliable that I'm tracking down another SDR2496 to be usaed as backup (with UPS) or for 48 tracks gigs. Then I'll be using a single DA78 for audience mics and past-24 tracks (my gigs usually fall within 32 tracks) slaved to MTC and WC from the Universal Slave Driver that gets TC and video Black from the video guys. The tracks are brought to a Yamaha 03D digital desk for reference and rough mix which I print via AES on an HHB Burn It Plus for the client at the end of the gig (I sometimes bring an old Sony DAT along...but it's getting rare...). Everything fits in my mini SUV, but since I'm planning to get a dedicated splitter I think I'll have very little space left when I'll need to bring all of my mics and stands around too...

Cheers

L.G.
Old 2nd September 2007
  #55
Super Moderator
 
Remoteness's Avatar
It's almost exactly five years to date...

I'm sure if we look at this poll today the numbers would change quite a bit.
I don't think digital tape recorders would be neck and neck with DAW systems.

What do you folks think?

Who hasn't voted yet?
Consider chiming in on this poll.

Lets see what the 2007 numbers will bring.
I'm interested to see the possible difference in the poll.

With 89 votes the 2002 poll numbers had hard disk recording on top with digital tape recorder a distant second...

Analog recorders (2", 1", 1/2", 1/4", audiocassette)........................4...........4.49%
Digital recorders (DASH, ADAT, DTRS, DAT, etc, etc)......................24.........26.97%
Hard disk recorders (RADAR, X48, HD24XR, MX2424, etc, etc)........38.........42.70%
DAW (PT and all the rest of the computer based rigs).....................23..........25.84%

And, the most important question I would like to ask all the 2007 newbie engineers is:
What does the word "tape" mean to you?

Thanks!
Old 2nd September 2007
  #56
Lives for gear
 
themaidsroom's Avatar
 

the best sounding live record i have heard this year was "nuff said"
impromptu gig in memory of dr. martin luther king the night after
he was shot - a gig by nina simone - the show was recorded on 1/4" tape
and listening to it on a piece of mint rca vinyl i could hear more highs and absolutely
more lows than any mordern live recording......

40 years later

to be fair,
it was nina
at a pivotal moment
the vibe was as deep
as the tape


be well


- jack
Old 2nd September 2007
  #57
Lives for gear
 
huub's Avatar
Pyramix with madi card is the weapon of choice.. Reasons: direct export of broadcast wave and/or aaf to fw disk straight after show for client, built in video/tc sync, madi to directly interface to console with up to 64 channels, ability to set and name markers during recording and edit/autotune straight after gig..
For backup tascam da98/88, but these are less reliable than pyramix i find (tape error, and eating tapes). long recordings are no prob on pyramix, and it seems (according to some of my british collegues, tim summerhayes and will shapland amongst others) to be the most reliable daw for remote recording.

EDIT: hmm, sound like an ad or something I am in no way affiliated with merging technologies, I swear!
Old 2nd September 2007
  #58
Lives for gear
 
pkautzsch's Avatar
 

FW interface(s) into Nuendo on PC Notebook here. For smaller dates, this all fits into two cases and a keyboard bag for the stands.
This is perfectly reliable for live recording as long as there's a multitrack backup machine (either HD recorder or another computer) running.
Yeah, Murphy's alive.
Old 3rd September 2007
  #59
I'm all on hard disk now. Main machine is a Windows NT machine running Sequoia. After some optimization, it is now rock-solid recording 16 tracks at 24/88.2. Backup is a Sound Devices 744T. The DA-38 and Prism bit-splitter are now permanently installed in my "legacy" rack. I no longer have to load session tapes into the DAW in real time before I can work on the material. I no longer have to stay up late formatting more DTRS tapes for the next day. I do have occasional sleepless nights after software updates that aren't ready for prime time. But I've started using Acronis True Image prior to updates, so I can roll the clock back if it all goes wrong.

David L. Rick
Seventh String Recording
Old 3rd September 2007
  #60
Lives for gear
 
taturana's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by opentune View Post
Been watching the latest RUSH DVD a couple of weeks ago. Altough i
cannot comment the mix/sound very detailed (cheapo HiFi...), i guess
it´s more like you would´ve wanted the RIO DVD to sound.
Check it out!
i saw the show in rio and it was pretty good...

i understand they had a lot of production problems here in brazil though, which might have hindered the recording... the making-of in the rush in rio dvd explains the story...

at showtime they were were still doing the soundcheck... so they got what they got on tape... the band was great though...
Topic:
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Similar Threads
Thread
Thread Starter / Forum
Replies
JCRockit / So much gear, so little time
117
jddrews / So much gear, so little time
28
Remoteness / Remote Possibilities in Acoustic Music and Location Recording
36
ampegfreak / High end
63

Forum Jump
Forum Jump