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Bachelor programs audio electronics?
Old 1 week ago
  #1
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brhoward's Avatar
 

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Bachelor programs audio electronics?

I have a student who is interested in getting into a school where he can focus on audio electronics design. Are there any programs in the US that focus on this directly? Or would he take basic electrical engineering, then focus in graduate school?

Perhaps Scott from Pueblo might know of something?
Old 6 days ago
  #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brhoward View Post
I have a student who is interested in getting into a school where he can focus on audio electronics design. Are there any programs in the US that focus on this directly? Or would he take basic electrical engineering, then focus in graduate school?

Perhaps Scott from Pueblo might know of something?
Hi,

I am not aware of any specific program like that. When I was a student, and later a lecturer, at USC School of Music they offered a cross-over program. Electronic Engineering majors could take the Recording Arts classes which were restricted to RA majors only. It was a sort of "super minor". I don't believe this program exists any longer nor do I think it was very effective. I never saw any of those students design or make anything of note. In my observations, the bulk of undergrad EE's are just not far enough along in knowledge or experience to benefit from an audio specific focus.

Before I ever went into pro audio, I had already gotten my education, credentials and worked professionally in nuclear and electronic engineering. Later I became interested in music and was accepted to USC. In all these cases I had instructors who were still working in their fields and so had a goal/results based attitude to their teachings.

Later, I had the very good fortune to be taken under the wings of two audio electronic masters: Mikey McClain of Motown & Beno May of A&M studios. Without their mentorship I would not have developed the craftsmanship I am so thankful for today. This cost me nothing but hard work & devotion while saving me untold years of fumbling in designer mediocrity. I could not have gotten that at a school.

If a person has talent and drive, they can get a long way in audio electronics on their own, avoiding crushing tuition debt. However, if you can get accepted to an EE school of merit, opportunities you may not have considered can open up. In either case, apprenticeship with a leading designer or company is key, in my opinion.

Hope that advise is helpful. Wishing you well!
Old 6 days ago
  #3
Lives for gear
University of Miami has an audio engineering focus out of the college of engineering (independent of the similar music technology program).

McGill maybe as well.

Both schools are more technical than your average "this is what a compressor does" goofy audio program...

Ultimately, no school is going to have a specific build-old-analog-gear degree. You have to do that on your own. All the jobs are in computer engineering / DSP.

So simply going to any engineering school, and participating in music on the side, will do.

As Scott attests, almost invariably when I've spoken to a gear designer, they came to pro audio as a hobby outside of full time work in a traditional engineering field.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Pass
"BS Physics UC Davis."

http://www.lavryengineering.com/about.html
"...designing circuits for telephone traffic measurement gear."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Kloss
"Physics, MIT"

List goes on and on.


http://www.aes.org/education/directory/programs.cfm

Last edited by brew; 6 days ago at 12:08 AM.. Reason: Added links.
Old 6 days ago
  #4
RPC
Gear Maniac
 

I'm a little different in that I actually got a scholarship (from Shure) to study audio engineering. It was a great gig - during my co-op stints I got to be on the development teams for the V15-V and SM-81, among other things. Even so, I came out of university with a plain vanilla electrical engineering degree - the audio emphasis was limited to a handful of courses in my senior year. My advice to your student would be to seek out domestic manufacturers of audio equipment and get an internship or co-op assignment.
Old 4 days ago
  #5
Colleges tend to select their curriculum for viable careers.
Old 4 days ago
  #6
RPC
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Williams View Post
Colleges tend to select their curriculum for viable careers.
Probably true for engineering schools/departments, but in general, I'd say there are many more graduates of e.g. art history programs (or, closer to home, audio recording programs) than there are job openings!
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