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Ken Lewis Mixing Tips
Old 29th October 2011
  #1
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Ken Lewis Mixing Tips & Online Audio School

I think I originally found this article at his website a while back but I could not longer find the link so I just copied and pasted from the file I had saved to my desktop. It was really helpful for me.

Ken Lewis’ Mixing Tips….


Monitoring is so important in so many ways. I use Event monitors with a subwoofer as my main monitors. However, I typically spend about 30 percent of any mix I do listening thru a boom box. That’s the real world and it needs to sound great on both the boom box and the Events. Each speaker will tell you different things, and the mix needs to translate equally well on both. I’ll also often burn a CD and take a drive in my car, blasting the mix and alternately listening to the radio. Sometimes I’ll reference on my ipod headphones as well. Always keep in mind what the end user is going to listen on.

Volume levels during mixing. I’ll always start a mix on stun volume for maybe a half hour. I want to get my adrenaline flowing and really get a good vibe going. I mix fairly quickly and within a half hour the music is usually starting to take shape. Once it begins feeling like a song, I back the volume off to normal listening volumes and I’ll sometime change it up from really quiet to really loud randomly. At some point late in the mix I’ll listen very loud again, this time not for the adrenaline, but because I want to make sure there aren’t any piercing or painful frequencies in the mix that I missed at lower volumes. I never want my mix to be pumping in a club and people are covering their ears.

Don’t forget about the song. Its important to get the beat hitting strong but don’t forget that you’re mixing a song for an artist, and that means the vocals have to sound great. The vocal should be the feature, which doesn’t necessarily mean they have to be really loud, but the mix needs to leave space for the vocal to shine. When I hear a song and I cant understand the vocal, I’m rarely drawn to it, even if the beat is hot. Having said that, I also hear a lot of mixes that sound like Karaoke, where the vocal sounds like it was added on top of the beat instead of mixed as a song. Everything must work together.

Digital Notch EQ’ing. When a particular sound is really bothering me, say a vocal or a tamborine, before I start doing broad sculpting equalization, I’ll often find one or two really offensive frequencies and completely notch them out. The Waves Q1 or the Sony Oxford EQ’s are good for this in the plugin world. Set a super tight notch and start very slowly sweeping where you think the really offensive frequency is, you’ll know when you find it, and it will often sound like its ringing, then just get rid of it. Often you’ll find what remains to be much more manageable, but be careful. Sometimes those frequencies are too important to a sound to get rid of. I once removed a tight notch of 12.3K from a really harshly bright tamborine once, and removing that one frequency made the instrument sound unbelievably better.

Don’t EQ so much!!!! I often hear inexperienced mixers rave about their 6 band or 10 band parametric EQs. Most of the time I don’t use more than one or two bands to EQ a sound, and I’ve never used a ten band parametric, ever. Let your ears guide your equalization and not your eyes. The first time I saw a Pultec I said “Why would anybody use that!!! Its only got low and high.” I was young.

Let your ears guide you! Often I wont EQ or compress a sound at all, but sometimes I’ll use 9 or 10 plugins on a single sound. I sculpt a sound til it feels right to me. I carry no preconceived notions about how to get there. Sometimes I sculpt, using many plugins to each do subtle things, chiseling out the sound I want gradually. Sometimes its perfect without touching it.

If you are mixing for a client, give them the mix they want. There’s a certain amount of art in mixing, and as an engineer, its easy to get married to your ideas and attempt to force them on a client. I often do a mix and the client will ask for changes which I completely disagree with, but I’ll at least try them then plead my case. Remember, your client probably has to stand behind that single project for the next two years, but tomorrow you’ll be mixing something else for someone else. Make sure your client walks away with a mix that they love, even if you don’t love it. And always put 100% into trying even the mix ideas you don’t agree with. Sometimes the outcome really surprises you.

Never hack a mix no matter who the client is. You are being hired for a job. You don’t have to like the song, but you should give it the best mix you possibly can. Some of my best long term clients brought me some pretty mediocre songs at first. If you are good at what you do, and you genuinely care about delivering for your client, you’ll get a lot of repeat business. I always try to treat my smallest clients mixes with the same care I would use mixing for Mariah Carey.


Don’t use presets as a crutch. Many people have asked me “what are your kick drum EQ settings”, or “How do you mix vocals”. The short answer is, I listen and figure out what I needs. I always try to approach each mix fresh, each sound fresh and let my ears tell me how to mold the sound. Sometimes I’ll experiment and start scrolling thru presets just to see what different ideas hit me, but I never just say “this is my kick drum preset”. Use your ears, not your eyes.

Find times to push your gear past its limits. I think the Joe Meek Compressor plugin sounds most analog when its driven to the edge of distortion. Sometimes the WAVES L1 sounds amazing when the threshold is all the way down. I’ve often distorted SSL channels or outboard mic pre’s for a certain effect, and often half the sound of mixing hip hop on an SSL is overloading the channels. Conservative mixing should be saved for Kenny G records.
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Old 29th October 2011
  #2
osd
Gear nut
 

Thanks for that. I dig the last sentence, heh heh
Old 29th October 2011
  #3
Old 29th October 2011
  #4
Gear Nut
 
Phillip's Avatar
 

yeeeep! I think I've read this before, but it always helps to re-read good advice even when you think you already know most stuff.
Old 29th October 2011
  #5
Lives for gear
 
e-are's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjboogie View Post
I think I found this at his website but I could not longer find the link so I just copied and pasted this. It was really helpful for me.

Ken Lewis’ Mixing Tips….


Monitoring is so important in so many ways. I use Event monitors with a subwoofer as my main monitors. However, I typically spend about 30 percent of any mix I do listening thru a boom box. That’s the real world and it needs to sound great on both the boom box and the Events. Each speaker will tell you different things, and the mix needs to translate equally well on both. I’ll also often burn a CD and take a drive in my car, blasting the mix and alternately listening to the radio. Sometimes I’ll reference on my ipod headphones as well. Always keep in mind what the end user is going to listen on.

Volume levels during mixing. I’ll always start a mix on stun volume for maybe a half hour. I want to get my adrenaline flowing and really get a good vibe going. I mix fairly quickly and within a half hour the music is usually starting to take shape. Once it begins feeling like a song, I back the volume off to normal listening volumes and I’ll sometime change it up from really quiet to really loud randomly. At some point late in the mix I’ll listen very loud again, this time not for the adrenaline, but because I want to make sure there aren’t any piercing or painful frequencies in the mix that I missed at lower volumes. I never want my mix to be pumping in a club and people are covering their ears.

Don’t forget about the song. Its important to get the beat hitting strong but don’t forget that you’re mixing a song for an artist, and that means the vocals have to sound great. The vocal should be the feature, which doesn’t necessarily mean they have to be really loud, but the mix needs to leave space for the vocal to shine. When I hear a song and I cant understand the vocal, I’m rarely drawn to it, even if the beat is hot. Having said that, I also hear a lot of mixes that sound like Karaoke, where the vocal sounds like it was added on top of the beat instead of mixed as a song. Everything must work together.

Digital Notch EQ’ing. When a particular sound is really bothering me, say a vocal or a tamborine, before I start doing broad sculpting equalization, I’ll often find one or two really offensive frequencies and completely notch them out. The Waves Q1 or the Sony Oxford EQ’s are good for this in the plugin world. Set a super tight notch and start very slowly sweeping where you think the really offensive frequency is, you’ll know when you find it, and it will often sound like its ringing, then just get rid of it. Often you’ll find what remains to be much more manageable, but be careful. Sometimes those frequencies are too important to a sound to get rid of. I once removed a tight notch of 12.3K from a really harshly bright tamborine once, and removing that one frequency made the instrument sound unbelievably better.

Don’t EQ so much!!!! I often hear inexperienced mixers rave about their 6 band or 10 band parametric EQs. Most of the time I don’t use more than one or two bands to EQ a sound, and I’ve never used a ten band parametric, ever. Let your ears guide your equalization and not your eyes. The first time I saw a Pultec I said “Why would anybody use that!!! Its only got low and high.” I was young.

Let your ears guide you! Often I wont EQ or compress a sound at all, but sometimes I’ll use 9 or 10 plugins on a single sound. I sculpt a sound til it feels right to me. I carry no preconceived notions about how to get there. Sometimes I sculpt, using many plugins to each do subtle things, chiseling out the sound I want gradually. Sometimes its perfect without touching it.

If you are mixing for a client, give them the mix they want. There’s a certain amount of art in mixing, and as an engineer, its easy to get married to your ideas and attempt to force them on a client. I often do a mix and the client will ask for changes which I completely disagree with, but I’ll at least try them then plead my case. Remember, your client probably has to stand behind that single project for the next two years, but tomorrow you’ll be mixing something else for someone else. Make sure your client walks away with a mix that they love, even if you don’t love it. And always put 100% into trying even the mix ideas you don’t agree with. Sometimes the outcome really surprises you.

Never hack a mix no matter who the client is. You are being hired for a job. You don’t have to like the song, but you should give it the best mix you possibly can. Some of my best long term clients brought me some pretty mediocre songs at first. If you are good at what you do, and you genuinely care about delivering for your client, you’ll get a lot of repeat business. I always try to treat my smallest clients mixes with the same care I would use mixing for Mariah Carey.


Don’t use presets as a crutch. Many people have asked me “what are your kick drum EQ settings”, or “How do you mix vocals”. The short answer is, I listen and figure out what I needs. I always try to approach each mix fresh, each sound fresh and let my ears tell me how to mold the sound. Sometimes I’ll experiment and start scrolling thru presets just to see what different ideas hit me, but I never just say “this is my kick drum preset”. Use your ears, not your eyes.

Find times to push your gear past its limits. I think the Joe Meek Compressor plugin sounds most analog when its driven to the edge of distortion. Sometimes the WAVES L1 sounds amazing when the threshold is all the way down. I’ve often distorted SSL channels or outboard mic pre’s for a certain effect, and often half the sound of mixing hip hop on an SSL is overloading the channels. Conservative mixing should be saved for Kenny G records.
Until I get every word of this in my head, I will read this before every mix. Very good tips.
Old 29th October 2011
  #6
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jjboogie's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phillip View Post
yeeeep! I think I've read this before, but it always helps to re-read good advice even when you think you already know most stuff.

I know there are a lot of newbies that come here too looking for mix tips but it is good for folks who have been doing it a while to look at it again as well.
Old 30th October 2011
  #7
Gear interested
 
SoUgly's Avatar
 

Really good advice, thanks jjboogie for sharing. Ken Lewis is a true Jedi in so many words.
Old 30th October 2011
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

great advice!!
Old 30th October 2011
  #9
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
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JJ,
thanks for re-posting. I totally forgot i wrote that and i cant remember where or when i wrote that. But still a good read and if i wrote it today it would be virtually the same. Glad some new people are getting the benefit of that insight. GS is a pretty amazing vehicle for sharing ideas dontcha think? I think one of my favorite threads i ever participated in was the one where i demanded everyone share one of their own tips or tricks, a good one, before i would answer. That was a really great thread. So, in that spirit, why dont some of you guys who got something positive out of this leave a gem here for everyone else to benefit from please.
Thanks guys!
-Ken Lewis
Old 30th October 2011
  #10
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Antagonist's Avatar
Ken - just out of curiosity, what kind of ride are you cruising in these days, and does it have a stock stereo?

Through the many years I've found myself doing a majority of critical listening on projects in my car. I'm always pumped when I get a new car, but always concerned about the new stereo and acoustic environment. My last few have been European BM's or Audi's so the footprint seems to be somewhat similar. I like checking mixes in higher end automobiles because they are usually acoustically tuned for a silent interior, and the leather makes for some good diffusers.
Old 30th October 2011
  #11
Lives for gear
 
Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antagonist View Post
Ken - just out of curiosity, what kind of ride are you cruising in these days, and does it have a stock stereo?

Through the many years I've found myself doing a majority of critical listening on projects in my car. I'm always pumped when I get a new car, but always concerned about the new stereo and acoustic environment. My last few have been European BM's or Audi's so the footprint seems to be somewhat similar. I like checking mixes in higher end automobiles because they are usually acoustically tuned for a silent interior, and the leather makes for some good diffusers.
Please read the post directly above yours. Leave us a tip or a trick, and i'll fully answer your question. Thanks!
-Ken
Old 30th October 2011
  #12
I recently have been sending bass out to my quantum hitting it with 10 db at 100 and using the send to drive a ts9 distortion pedal. I then bring them both up on my metric halo. I then print and blend to taste.

I've been getting results.
Old 30th October 2011
  #13
Gear Nut
 
Phillip's Avatar
 

When you think the mix is 90% there, take a break...
go eat at a quiet place and on the way to and from listen to music from a different genre than the one you are working on at a level you can talk over.
When you come back your perspective should be clear and you might find that you are in fact 90% there or you might find you have to start over.


I find that a tiny bit of reverb on high hats and snare before my parallel compression bus helps glue the drums together and augments the pumping/ breathing sound that I go for sometimes.

Try to imagine your mix as an old photograph... with plenty of contrast, balance and a depth of field that spans slightly out of focus in the background to sharp focus in the foreground...

Ask not what a plugin can do for you, but what you can do with that plugin.
Old 30th October 2011
  #14
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e-are's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phillip View Post

Ask not what a plugin can do for you, but what you can do with that plugin.
heh

JJ Boogie- Thanks for starting this thread.
Ken- Thanks for being....well...you!


I find myself monitoring thru my HS50's for longer periods of time, with the sub off, and the volume relatively low. I focus a lot more on the mid range and try to;season to taste; the top and bottom end.

I use a lot more hardware now so I insert it into the track. Then add a new audio track and send the output of the new track through the same outs as the original track. Then send the original track to the new track and monitor thru that. That way I can work on the track until I'm finished, record every track that has hardware inserted at once while running the mix off. Works like a charm and I can totally recall the session.


Now Ken. I am really interested in knowing how you are using the Uad Ampex plugin. Are you mixing thru the plug? Throwing it on after you've finished the mix? I'm not familiar with tape at all but I do like what this thing does as well. I just don't have the knowledge about the Ampex to get more out of it than I am. Any tips or info on it would be greatly appreciated bro?

-Wayne
Old 30th October 2011
  #15
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PRPS's Avatar
great post

*subscribes*
Old 30th October 2011
  #16
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mikeg09's Avatar
The thing that has helped me a lot is experimenting with stereo separation and panning. I remember Ken telling me this when he was giving me advise on one of my mixes.

Now my stuff sounds bigger and much more entertaining to listen to! Thanks ken!
Old 30th October 2011
  #17
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by e-are View Post
heh

JJ Boogie- Thanks for starting this thread.
Ken- Thanks for being....well...you!


I find myself monitoring thru my HS50's for longer periods of time, with the sub off, and the volume relatively low. I focus a lot more on the mid range and try to;season to taste; the top and bottom end.

I use a lot more hardware now so I insert it into the track. Then add a new audio track and send the output of the new track through the same outs as the original track. Then send the original track to the new track and monitor thru that. That way I can work on the track until I'm finished, record every track that has hardware inserted at once while running the mix off. Works like a charm and I can totally recall the session.


Now Ken. I am really interested in knowing how you are using the Uad Ampex plugin. Are you mixing thru the plug? Throwing it on after you've finished the mix? I'm not familiar with tape at all but I do like what this thing does as well. I just don't have the knowledge about the Ampex to get more out of it than I am. Any tips or info on it would be greatly appreciated bro?

-Wayne
Thanks for the tip!

UAD Ampex. I usually wait until my mix is almost completely done, then i put it on. That thing is pure magic. i have no idea what its doing or how i could get that sound any other way (other than to hit tape, which is not an option or cost effective here). Its one of those things thats subtle but definitely gives you a few percent of extra goodness. I play with the settings, but i've been gravitating toward ATR / 1 inch tape / 15 ips /

Its a LITTLE bit noisy, so on a ballad you might bump it to 30 ips and play with calibrations, but its a real gem.
Old 30th October 2011
  #18
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeg09 View Post
The thing that has helped me a lot is experimenting with stereo separation and panning. I remember Ken telling me this when he was giving me advise on one of my mixes.

Now my stuff sounds bigger and much more entertaining to listen to! Thanks ken!
Just DONT overuse all that stereo widening plugin stuff available nowadays. I thought alot of the worst mixes from the Really Hot Summer mixoff were ruined because of people trying to make stuff too widened. Panning is fine, but those widening plugins can be quickly and easily overused.
Old 30th October 2011
  #19
Gear maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
Panning is fine, but those widening plugins can be quickly and easily overused.
Old 30th October 2011
  #20
Geariophile
 
Karloff70's Avatar
 

Good plan making this another tips thread! Never enough good tips for anyone, regardless where on this journey.

So my little and maybe obvious tip to add to the party: When eqing listen to the shape of the whole track (or combination of parts playing at the time) and what happens to the shape of that entirety when you eq that one part, NOT what happens to the part itself. Go in to clean up the edges of the part in solo after, sure, but other than that the change to the whole is what you want to pay attention to.

For instance often the illusion of brightening up a seemingly dull part is best achieved by brightening another part entirely. Ever brightened up a hihat by changing the top of the pad/strings eq?
Old 31st October 2011
  #21
Gear Addict
 
ramil's Avatar
 

that sentence about using broad eq's and pulteq made my day \\// good stuff
Old 31st October 2011
  #22
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e-are's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
Thanks for the tip!

UAD Ampex. I usually wait until my mix is almost completely done, then i put it on. That thing is pure magic. i have no idea what its doing or how i could get that sound any other way (other than to hit tape, which is not an option or cost effective here). Its one of those things thats subtle but definitely gives you a few percent of extra goodness. I play with the settings, but i've been gravitating toward ATR / 1 inch tape / 15 ips /

Its a LITTLE bit noisy, so on a ballad you might bump it to 30 ips and play with calibrations, but its a real gem.
Good deal. Thanks.
Old 31st October 2011
  #23
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jjboogie's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
JJ,
thanks for re-posting. I totally forgot i wrote that and i cant remember where or when i wrote that. But still a good read and if i wrote it today it would be virtually the same. Glad some new people are getting the benefit of that insight. GS is a pretty amazing vehicle for sharing ideas dontcha think? I think one of my favorite threads i ever participated in was the one where i demanded everyone share one of their own tips or tricks, a good one, before i would answer. That was a really great thread. So, in that spirit, why dont some of you guys who got something positive out of this leave a gem here for everyone else to benefit from please.
Thanks guys!
-Ken Lewis

Yeah GS is a great vehicle for sharing ideas indeed.....but also it is really awesome that top tier producers and engineers like yourself take the time to help out young up and coming engineers and producers here as well.
Old 31st October 2011
  #24
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3rd Degree's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Antagonist View Post
Ken - just out of curiosity, what kind of ride are you cruising in these days, and does it have a stock stereo?

Through the many years I've found myself doing a majority of critical listening on projects in my car. I'm always pumped when I get a new car, but always concerned about the new stereo and acoustic environment. My last few have been European BM's or Audi's so the footprint seems to be somewhat similar. I like checking mixes in higher end automobiles because they are usually acoustically tuned for a silent interior, and the leather makes for some good diffusers.
One thing to keep in mind, no matter what car and if you are stock or not. Think about how much time the average person spends in there car. It is almost impossible to not let your ears "tune" to your car and know it like the back of your hand, given some time as it is probably the place most of us listen to music on most (recreationally). I have been hesitant to replace my front speakers, thinking I know mine that well, but I know when I do, it will take me a week tops to get used to the difference.
Old 31st October 2011
  #25
Gear nut
 

My 2 cents - De-essing can be used for A LOT more than vocals in terms of cutting harsh frequencies and giving more breathing room to an overall mix... with that being said, they are also the smallest "Q" you will get :D Ps- API 2500 followed by 1176.. on EVERYTHING. just kidding.. but for real...
Old 31st October 2011
  #26
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jjboogie's Avatar
 

Thread Starter
Tip: For a sound where you need to clear up the middle and widen it try using the Waves Center plugin if you've got it and Turn the punch knob up and the center slider down.

It really brings down the audio in the center and widens the sound source making way for vocals or kick or snare in the center.



Question for Ken: I know you have a console that you mix on but also mix in the box. I was wondering if you have any experiences with Summing box's and whether or not you feel they are necessary for those who primarily mix ITB.

Thanks
JJ
Old 31st October 2011
  #27
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjboogie View Post
Tip: For a sound where you need to clear up the middle and widen it try using the Waves Center plugin if you've got it and Turn the punch knob up and the center slider down.

It really brings down the audio in the center and widens the sound source making way for vocals or kick or snare in the center.



Question for Ken: I know you have a console that you mix on but also mix in the box. I was wondering if you have any experiences with Summing box's and whether or not you feel they are necessary for those who primarily mix ITB.

Thanks
JJ
Hi JJ, thanks for the tip, i'm gonna try that one. to answer your question. I pretty much grew up in this industry mixing on big SSL and Neve consoles among others. When technology changed i was one of the first to start mixing in the box professionally. I never thought my mixes were as good ITB as on a console, and i had heard about summing. So i went to 32 channels of SPL Mix Dream. significant upgrade from ITB. Then i was growing discontent with that setup so i bought an analog SSL mixing console, which put me in the deepest debt of my life. never been happier.

Some guys do great work ITB and sonics and plugins definitely keep getting better and better, so i think to each their own. I still love the analog world.
Ken
Old 31st October 2011
  #28
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Nahuel's Avatar
 

This is something I had to do recently and it worked pretty well...

I had that sample in my beat that had several elements mixed together: there was a guitar with some ep and a bass... to me it sounded fine but the client wanted less guitar... I ended up isolating the transients from the guitar with the split function and trimmed each one down: the result was pretty cool it sounded like the gtr was far away sent to a big verb. Not a crazy tip but that's all I had in store atm.
Old 1st November 2011
  #29
Gear Guru
 
rickrock305's Avatar
 

Tip: not sure where I heard this one, I think it's an old Andy Wallace trick, but 1176 parallel compressing your whole mix. Doesn't work all the time, but sometimes it REALLY works!

Tip: when tracking vocals and the artist is almost getting the line but can't quite pull it off, just bump the level to their headphones up just a hair, like a dB. Not obviously audible to the point where it will distract, but something happens psychologically and it quite often works.

Tip: don't overlook old, cheap, or broken gear. Sometimes that broken piece of gear will give you a certain kind of sound or distortion that is unique. I know quite a few engineers who have secret weapon boxes like this.

Tip: I use this more for a live drum kit, but I guess you could simulate it for programmed drums. Slap a expander/gate on your room mics and use the snare to trigger it.

Ken, I'd be interested to hear more about your workflow ITB vs OTB. You're on the AWS900 right? I really like that console, had one at the studio for awhile and loved the workflow, the sound, the recall, the ease of use.

What percentage of automation are you doin in Pro Tools vs. using the console automation for rides? As far as EQ goes, do you do most of your cutting with digital EQ and then boost with the console EQs or other outboard or are there plugin EQs you're digging for boosts? And what about compression? Being that the AWS is a bit limited there, do you use more ITB compression or outboard? And how do you approach recalls? Print stems? Console recall?

Have you looked at the new AWS 948? An incredibly powerful console in a tiny footprint. They added some really cool features. I believe there's a thread on it in the High End forum. So 10 years from now when you're done paying off your AWS maybe you could check it out! heh
Old 1st November 2011
  #30
Gear Nut
 
Phillip's Avatar
 

Tip for folks just starting out:

Mixing is an art with a lot of theory behind it but like with any form of art, theory can get in the way of working. Try to absorb as much as you can and then when it is time to mix, trust yourself and don't let the knowledge get in your way. I need elbow room to get it to sound right sometimes.
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