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Lowpass on vocals Condenser Microphones
Old 19th September 2011
  #31
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Danny Downer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by talontsiawd View Post
I understand mixing a beat is incredibly easier than mixing a song. I was just saying, many times where I have really bad issues, the person did not give me dry tracks. I am just wondering if some of you are getting tracks with eq or other effects because they want something to sound they way they want but then have you magically fix their errors they created after tracking. I always make sure to ask if I am in doubt.

Again, I also understand that vocal recording has so many variables to mess up and even your dry tracks may sound absolutely horrific. I am just curious if some of you are always getting a dry track. That was my only real point is if in doubt, it doesn't hurt to follow up. Has saved me a bunch of time on a single mixdown but they also understand for the future and I don't have to deal with it again with the same person. Not saying it's the case, just wondering if it could be.
Got u, didn't wanna indoctrinate you

But it's not the cause even though it's the case often heh hate it when I get wet vocals I mean WTF but I just tell em it doesnt work that way...
But what mostly works is tell em to print the Verb or delay Return solo!
Old 20th September 2011
  #32
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JanZoo's Avatar
For years I was trying to get rid of harsh digital high end, I mean it is not harsh, it is just true. And to be clear, even modern top selling hiphop and urban pop albums sound harsh in highs to me and too sharp.

And I was trying different saturators to soften the highs and everything I could find, but lately, I tried it with lowpass with low slope at 14-15 khz and that always do the thing on the vocals. But that's me
Old 20th September 2011
  #33
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Danny Downer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanZoo View Post
For years I was trying to get rid of harsh digital high end, I mean it is not harsh, it is just true. And to be clear, even modern top selling hiphop and urban pop albums sound harsh in highs to me and too sharp.

And I was trying different saturators to soften the highs and everything I could find, but lately, I tried it with lowpass with low slope at 14-15 khz and that always do the thing on the vocals. But that's me
that's not just you as u can see in this thread a lotta people do it
Old 18th August 2013
  #34
Gear Addict
 

It depends on the recording, but yeah, I lowpass vocals sometimes. Sonimus Sweetone is a great tool for that.
Old 18th August 2013
  #35
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rogernotroger's Avatar
 

Think this is a Pensado trick, and is actually intended for de-essing, but might work on harsh hi-end (haven't tried it myself on hi-end).

Instead of using a de-esser, set up a duplicate vocal track as a key into the sidechain of the main vocal compressor. EQ the key vocal track to where all you can hear is the nasty spectrum of the hi-end EQ you want to tame. Now the main vocal compressor should duck the signal as much as you instruct it to when those harsh hi-end freqs appear, and you're not actually having to roll off any hi-end or do any destructive EQ'ing to the main vocal. YMMV. Let me know if this works at all?????
Old 18th August 2013
  #36
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Storyville's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogernotroger View Post
Think this is a Pensado trick, and is actually intended for de-essing, but might work on harsh hi-end (haven't tried it myself on hi-end).

Instead of using a de-esser, set up a duplicate vocal track as a key into the sidechain of the main vocal compressor. EQ the key vocal track to where all you can hear is the nasty spectrum of the hi-end EQ you want to tame. Now the main vocal compressor should duck the signal as much as you instruct it to when those harsh hi-end freqs appear, and you're not actually having to roll off any hi-end or do any destructive EQ'ing to the main vocal. YMMV. Let me know if this works at all?????
The key to that trick is moving the duplicate slightly ahead on the original track so that the compressor can react to a harsh hi-end tone right before it actually happens. Otherwise all you are doing is setting up a filtered side-chain, which is pretty much what every de-esser under the sun does. Although in fairness you can get really specific doing it this way.
Old 18th August 2013
  #37
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rogernotroger's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storyville View Post
The key to that trick is moving the duplicate slightly ahead on the original track so that the compressor can react to a harsh hi-end tone right before it actually happens. Otherwise all you are doing is setting up a filtered side-chain, which is pretty much what every de-esser under the sun does. Although in fairness you can get really specific doing it this way.
Nice! I haven't tried putting the key signal ahead of the main. Thanks for the tip.
Old 18th August 2013
  #38
DAH
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DAH's Avatar
I use Oktava MK-319 on my vox and sometimes I low-pass as high as 10 khz. IMO it IS used on commercial urban genres records. Think of Methman vox...
Old 18th November 2015
  #39
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Fergies Watch's Avatar
Old thread I know but worth discussing. My technique is to use the low pass on the warm audio pultec copy by setting the low pass to 20k and then to turn the cut to 4 or 5 or whichever point I get the smoothness in the top end. I usually then brighten set at 10k to add lift, seems to give a nice blend of modern highs, but with a smoothness curve to the top.

I'm using a cu29 telefunken mic which isn't the brightest of condenser mics but I notice that if I bypass the WA eq I hear a zingy ness return that isn't too appealing, but you don't generally notice it if I wasn't using the low pass trick with high end boost.

I think what's happening here is that we are trying to get the sound of the u47 vocal where there is a smoothness to the top end that is not overbearing and using the filters in this way almost creates this, albeit in a more manufactured way, however still effective.

The more I hear this technique in action the more I liked it and so I tried it on guitars and other instruments, which incidentally really helps me shape my mix and I've found its the easiest way to create back to front perspective, combined with volume.

Cheers

Stu

Last edited by Fergies Watch; 18th November 2015 at 11:06 PM..
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