The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 Search This Thread  Search This Forum  Search Reviews  Search Gear Database  Search Gear for sale  Search Gearslutz Go Advanced
3 Newby Questions for engineers DAW Software
Old 15th September 2011
  #1
Here for the gear
 

3 Newby Questions for engineers

Hello all I am pretty new to this group and i will post as I see fit but I do have 3 question that i hope can be answered. I have always read GS for years but never joined...today I joined

Asisde form "using my ears" what are some creative ways i can find clashing frequencies and "unclash" them? Should I be using a spec analyzer? I read about using the Eq to seep back and forth until i hear the loudest part of the sound but i dont quite get what to do from that point.

Also I read that is a good idea to cut low frequencies that we cant hear from instruments. When i do that my mix seems really "thin" Am i missing the point

Last one ...the sit back that i you guys often refers to...how do you obtain that? For example on one thread someone suggested that he "sit the kick drum back a bit"


thanks..look forward to the community
Old 15th September 2011
  #2
Gear Head
 

should be in the newbie section, but I can answer the third one. Sitting back in the mix means its less apparent. Sometimes a kick will be too big for the sample and make things sound less than smooth, for example. Then by simply turning down the volume or adding some reverb to the kick, it is less in-your-face and sounds better.
Old 16th September 2011
  #3
Lives for gear
 
Danny Downer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmiddlez View Post
Hello all I am pretty new to this group and i will post as I see fit but I do have 3 question that i hope can be answered. I have always read GS for years but never joined...today I joined

Asisde form "using my ears" what are some creative ways i can find clashing frequencies and "unclash" them? Should I be using a spec analyzer? I read about using the Eq to seep back and forth until i hear the loudest part of the sound but i dont quite get what to do from that point.

Also I read that is a good idea to cut low frequencies that we cant hear from instruments. When i do that my mix seems really "thin" Am i missing the point

Last one ...the sit back that i you guys often refers to...how do you obtain that? For example on one thread someone suggested that he "sit the kick drum back a bit"


thanks..look forward to the community
Well u could use a analyzer but it's better to do by hearing... Its a process after some years u will recognize things like that guitar has too much mud and clashes with the bass etc... What I always refer to people that want to learn is: take loops of Instruments (best from a sample CD) and use a analyzer on them. That way u can see what frequencies the various Instruments reserve and wich ones are really dominant....

Your second point has a simple answer: It makes sense to cut the parts of a signal that are not really needed like the low end on a hihat for example because even if not audible there is energy in that range blockin room for Instruments that really need it BUT if ur mix sounds thin you probly just cutted too much
Old 16th September 2011
  #4
Lives for gear
 

3 Newby Questions for engineers

Yup. Thin sound means too much. But before you take all the filtering back off, think of which few sounds should be fatter. Now back of the filtering on those sounds and accomplish two things: no longer thin, no longer clashing.
Old 16th September 2011
  #5
Gear Addict
if your a newbie the best way i found to learn to mix is to use presets... see what they do, hear the difference, and then you can tweak them how you want... instead of just changing settings and not really understanding what your doing
Old 16th September 2011
  #6
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by light View Post
if your a newbie the best way i found to learn to mix is to use presets... see what they do, hear the difference, and then you can tweak them how you want... instead of just changing settings and not really understanding what your doing
where do i find mix presets? Do you mean the presets for the reverb for example like small room large hall etc...or are there presets for an entire mix in general? I mix in pro tools 8
Old 16th September 2011
  #7
Presets are a waste of time as presets where made by some guy not knowing anything about your song. There are no set settings for effects, like Eq, reverbs, Compressors, and all the other effects. What works for one song may not work for another song. There are many many variables to take into account.
You use your ears and you adjust each knob/slider until you get the sound your looking for.

Learning how to use each effect is the best way to use effects
Old 16th September 2011
  #8
Lives for gear
 
3rd Degree's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CJ Mastering View Post
Presets are a waste of time as presets where made by some guy not knowing anything about your song. There are no set settings for effects, like Eq, reverbs, Compressors, and all the other effects. What works for one song may not work for another song. There are many many variables to take into account.
You use your ears and you adjust each knob/slider until you get the sound your looking for.

Learning how to use each effect is the best way to use effects
I never used presets but I had a class for PT and for one assignment, we were supposed to use only presets to learn about frequencies. The class assumed you never dealt with plug ins, etc. I was so surprised how "generic" they were, in a bad way, and how much harder it made mixing for me. I still got a perfect score but I was using vocal presets on my drums, guitar presets on vocals, etc. Not what my professor intended but he appreciated the result, which still sucked, just not as bad as the rest.

In the past, I have even made my own presets for artists I work with for vocal eq. They were just supposed to be a starting point for a rough mix for them to be able to drive home to. Even then I found myself starting over way too often to the point they were as worthless as the rest.



I may have appreciated this lesson more if I had no idea what I was doing but being forced to use presets was a very painful experience to me.


My advice would be to focus on one type of effect at a time. Maybe start with EQ. You don't have to master it before moving on, just get to where you understand it and add another variable. I would say compression would be second (and spend a long time on this one). Then maybe time based stuff (delays/reverb). Then the more surgical/corrective stuff (dessers, pitch correction and the like).

Unfortunately, when you start mixing, you usually start out with poor recordings as well. Try to find well recorded sessions, people post some every now and then here. I don't know how many bad habits I am learning to break as I have improved my source, both instrumentals and vocal recording.
Old 16th September 2011
  #9
Here for the gear
 

Thanks for all of the replies
Top Mentioned Products
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump