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Inspiration for Mixing and Production Beginners
Old 13th September 2011
  #1
Gear Maniac
 
SOBERMINDEDMUSIC's Avatar
 

Inspiration for Mixing and Production Beginners

A quote I read.


"Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through."
— Ira Glass
Old 13th September 2011
  #2
Lives for gear
 

This is good stuff!!

Edit: Sticky please.
Old 13th September 2011
  #3
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Exactly.

I want to elaborate further in terms of advice. Always finish your work as a beginner, no matter what it sounds like. I know so many people who have been "beat making" for years but have very little completed work. More often than not, they practice what they are good at, not what they are bad at and possibly skip that part entirely. If you are really good at making melodies but suck at arrangement and making drum patterns, you weakness in those areas become worse over time because your melodies sound better. Then you have to spend a lot more time learning something you really lack at.

I know people who rap that write everyday but rap a few songs a year. They have developed their writing, their concepts, but their flow still sounds like they started yesterday.
Old 13th September 2011
  #4
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Inspiration for Mixing and Production Beginners

I remember I started reading gs years ago hoping to find the secret recipies of a good mix.

I wanted my drums to bang, my snare to crack and snap, my bass to be fat, etc...

Thankfully I read before posting, and found many folks sought the same. I'm glad it was them getting killed instead of me... Pride would have gotten in the way if I had felt singled out. But through my serogates I learned something:

The reason my mixes weren't good was because I wasn't good at mixing. (a billion times thankyou, psm!)

It's that simple realization that was the fundamental cornerstone of where my skills have gone.

It's weird though, but human nature, pride, prevents so many of us from realizing this humbling and potent truth: "You aren't good at it...yet." Why would a beginner be? It's actually disrespectful of one's self to assume otherwise. Doing so discounts your own ability to grow.

So to any open minded, knowledge hungry beginners: The answer to why you are struggling for quality is: You have a lot to learn. Use this as motivation. Use it as a shield. No one can insult your work, because it is a beatiful thing. It is life. It is the path of mastery on which all self aware minds journey together.

And if the proceeding statements were a little hippie for your taste then look up "the dunning-krueger effect." (do it anyway!) Understanding it will alter your perspective on you and the world around you forever.
Old 13th September 2011
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Ray View Post
So to any open minded, knowledge hungry beginners: The answer to why you are struggling for quality is: You have a lot to learn. Use this as motivation. Use it as a shield. No one can insult your work, because it is a beatiful thing. It is life. It is the path of mastery on which all self aware minds journey together.
You post was right on but this is extremely well put. Unfortunately Rap and Hip Hop have an underlying "ego" where many feel like the goal is "proving themselves", even when it is to their detriment. Sure, at some point everyone has to prove themselves, often continuously for long periods of time. That is not the stage where you accomplish that.
Old 13th September 2011
  #6
Gear Maniac
 
SOBERMINDEDMUSIC's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by talontsiawd View Post
Exactly.

I want to elaborate further in terms of advice. Always finish your work as a beginner, no matter what it sounds like. I know so many people who have been "beat making" for years but have very little completed work. More often than not, they practice what they are good at, not what they are bad at and possibly skip that part entirely. If you are really good at making melodies but suck at arrangement and making drum patterns, you weakness in those areas become worse over time because your melodies sound better. Then you have to spend a lot more time learning something you really lack at.

I know people who rap that write everyday but rap a few songs a year. They have developed their writing, their concepts, but their flow still sounds like they started yesterday.
Good insight. Until I got my new laptop a month ago, I fell into this trap, on the production side. I never had any problems on the rapping side, because first, it came second nature, and secondly, I have effectively honed my skill over the years. For example, I would focus on writing a battle rap one day, the next day maybe story telling. The next day maybe flow and delivery. Didn't start doing that on the production side until I bought my new laptop, and made a decision to monitor and limit the amount of tracks that I was making..I literally have hundreds of unfinished beats. As a result, my beat catalog is not what it should be. But now, I commit to finishing what I start and I do the deliberate practicing thing. I focus on chopping samples on one song, the next, melody and chord progression, the next on capturing a certain mood. So I am working more efficiently.

But even when I was half doing beats in my old manner, I did learn about different DAWS, and therefore learning which ones I prefer for production and which I prefer for mixing. I learned the quick keys and different features of each, and developed my own work flow. So while I may have been kind of spinning my wheels as a producer, I was getting stronger as an engineer.. at least that's how I spin it.
Old 13th September 2011
  #7
DAH
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An arguable "last instance truth". WTF a story is a Preem's 8 bar beat ithout an MC ? Still, if the beat didn't have an MC on top of it, would it be less of a "story"?
"Talking loud but saying nothing"
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