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Dropping elements of beat in and out.... techniques? DAW Software
Old 24th December 2010
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Dropping elements of beat in and out.... techniques?

Aightt slutz,

I was wondering if any of you could offer some advice on how you drop elements of your beats in and out. I find that if something drops out of my beats even if its quite quiet it really does feel like something has been pulled out. One of the things I notice about beats I love is how fluid they are, a how even when the drums drop in and out it doesn't sound abrupt.

Anyway, over to you guys

Any pointers?

Thanks in advance
Old 24th December 2010
  #2
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by folb695 View Post
Aightt slutz,

I was wondering if any of you could offer some advice on how you drop elements of your beats in and out. I find that if something drops out of my beats even if its quite quiet it really does feel like something has been pulled out. One of the things I notice about beats I love is how fluid they are, a how even when the drums drop in and out it doesn't sound abrupt.

Anyway, over to you guys

Any pointers?

Thanks in advance
I'm very glad this post came up actually. For the past three weeks I've been using the pads on the Akai MPD26 to do my mutes. It may not be anything special due to it's simplistic nature, but it kind of takes me back to the much earlier days when we had to use our fingers for our drops. I was inspired by my memories which led me to trying it out with my MIDI controller.

The drop is a powerful musical statement in my personal opinion. It's where you can accentuate a lyric or musical performance such as a subtle synth arpeggio, a smooth acoustic slide or a wailing guitar vibrato. For me personally mutes gives the song mix movement and depth because it reveals your personality as producer.

Sure doing it with a mouse is cool because of the precision, but inperfection of the finger mute is priceless because that's really you shining through the mix. I hope this makes sense to y'all.
Old 24th December 2010
  #3
Gear Head
 

i work in pro tools and when i have an audio drum loop going i will tab to transient to a part in the middle or beginning or end of the loop (where ever i decide it will sound good just test different things out), apple e to separate and then apple m to mute the part of the region i want to drop out. (if you decide that part doesn't sound good you just unmute the region) If im working with MIDI i will do the same or select certain notes and mute those. Also when working with MIDI i will drop certain parts of the drums out, keep just the hi hat or just the kick and snare, etc. Just try different things out.

For an example here is something i made ****ing with the skull snaps break. you can hear where the drums get muted and then come back in. (i'm no expert btw)

elsterNJ - ALBeatGuitarUnmixed on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free
Old 24th December 2010
  #4
Lives for gear
 
ryst's Avatar
 

I prefer not to do any drops or edits until it's ready to be mixed or during the mixing stage. If the vocals aren't there, I don't have a full representation of the song so my judgement isn't clear.

And with tracks I've mixed from other artists, I've noticed that I had to put drops in different places than they originally were because the vocalist had a different flow than the drops that were in the beat from the producer. So it's much easier (at least for me), to do drops and edits once the song is finished so I have a clear idea of what everything sounds like on context (if I'm mixing some one else's track).

Other times, I've gotten tracks from producers who actually understand what a good arrangement is (very rare) and I don't have to do anything. They make the song work dynamically so that no matter who is on the track, it won't need edited after the vocals have ben recorded.
Old 24th December 2010
  #5
g22
Lives for gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by folb695 View Post
Aightt slutz,

I was wondering if any of you could offer some advice on how you drop elements of your beats in and out. I find that if something drops out of my beats even if its quite quiet it really does feel like something has been pulled out. One of the things I notice about beats I love is how fluid they are, a how even when the drums drop in and out it doesn't sound abrupt.

Anyway, over to you guys

Any pointers?

Thanks in advance
You should only do it if you think it flows with groove. Some grooves build to a point where you just can feel its time to do a brief pause of some sort, but you got to do it in rhythm and at the right time. Dont just do it for the heck of it, randomly. If it doesn't sound right when you try it, maybe there isnt meant to be a drop there at all. Its best to wait until the vocals are down first so you really can see the big picture and where drops might work.
Old 24th December 2010
  #6
Lives for gear
 
Cgbravo's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Marriott View Post
I'm very glad this post came up actually. For the past three weeks I've been using the pads on the Akai MPD26 to do my mutes. It may not be anything special due to it's simplistic nature, but it kind of takes me back to the much earlier days when we had to use our fingers for our drops. I was inspired by my memories which led me to trying it out with my MIDI controller.

The drop is a powerful musical statement in my personal opinion. It's where you can accentuate a lyric or musical performance such as a subtle synth arpeggio, a smooth acoustic slide or a wailing guitar vibrato. For me personally mutes gives the song mix movement and depth because it reveals your personality as producer.

Sure doing it with a mouse is cool because of the precision, but inperfection of the finger mute is priceless because that's really you shining through the mix. I hope this makes sense to y'all.
Imperfection is perfect/pricessless when your putting so much emotion on a track, I find myself doing random drops just for the feel and even though it is unusual I believe in it and leave it!
Old 24th December 2010
  #7
Gear Maniac
 

sorry

wow, sorry I think people have misunderstood what I'm talking about.

I mean just elements not the whole track. Like a melody that plays off the main riff for example
Old 24th December 2010
  #8
Gear Maniac
 

YouTube - Timbaland - If We Ever Meet Again ft. Katy Perry [Shock Value II][Download]

here's a perfect example, (my sister was listening to it, don't hate its banga) The siren at the beginning drops in and comes out so nicely, soooooo smooth

I would like my instruments to drop in and out with that confidence and smoothness
Old 25th December 2010
  #9
Lives for gear
 
illacov's Avatar
 

Use the mute button and automate.

If using the grid is too rigid then turn off snap and fine tune the mute automation until it actually hits in the right place.

Sometimes you want to do the drop not exactly on the money. There's plenty of times where the drop happens after the initial drum hit sounds out so the drum would come in an 1/8th note after the 1.

You also need to know what elements to mute when you do your drops.

Do you let the bassline, piano and kick drum all sound before your drop?

These are arrangement issues and these can make or break a drop.

One trick that's cool and rather cliched but still pretty fun to do is let your kick drum hit do the drop on the following eighth note. But when the kick drum plays add in a short/kind of quick paced baby scratch pitching from high to low.

I mean truly the track (if its banging) will tell you where the best places are to drop. But the MC has to write around that rhythmic pulse as well for the drop to really resonate with the listener. If you have a guy who ain't really riding the beat too hot or he's using an odd cadence you may need to find different ways to make a drop. Or even if MC Cat in the Hat deserves a drop. In the old days me and my homeboys would all be writing our asses off trying to get "the drop," on a track. If you didn't come correct you weren't getting a drop. Real Talk. Nowadays anybody gets em lol

Peace
Illumination
Old 25th December 2010
  #10
Lives for gear
 
atma's Avatar
i think the mpc-style track mute is a good way to go.. some of it's trial and error, but i think it helps to perform the mutes real-time vs. after-the-fact editing. what happens is you loop sections and after a while you can start creatively responding instinctively with the mute function. it seems to come off as somewhat smoother and more natural that way.
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