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Trip-Hop from the Pros!
Old 28th December 2009
  #1
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Trip-Hop from the Pros!

Love Gearslutz for just this:
I stumbled across a thread asking for experience with Trip-Hop production.
Low and behold, Paul Godfrey of the UK band Morcheeba chimed in.
Being a fan of their records for years, I wanted to start this thread as a way to bring our friend Paul Godfrey to speak about his studio and production experience.

My first question would be the obvious:
Morcheeba started in 1996 before the home studio revolution. As a full time professional act for over a decade, how has the technology affected your production style?
What was your first studio like and what is your current production rig?
Do you incorporate other studios, musicians, producers and engineers with your work?

Also, how have you found the best way to translate electronic records to a live performance with a band? Start with the drummer feed a midi click?
I have an artist I am struggling with getting from computer production-land to band-land...

Cheers and thanks!
Old 29th December 2009
  #2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
Love Gearslutz for just this:
I stumbled across a thread asking for experience with Trip-Hop production.
Low and behold, Paul Godfrey of the UK band Morcheeba chimed in.
Being a fan of their records for years, I wanted to start this thread as a way to bring our friend Paul Godfrey to speak about his studio and production experience.

My first question would be the obvious:
Morcheeba started in 1996 before the home studio revolution. As a full time professional act for over a decade, how has the technology affected your production style?
What was your first studio like and what is your current production rig?
Do you incorporate other studios, musicians, producers and engineers with your work?

Also, how have you found the best way to translate electronic records to a live performance with a band? Start with the drummer feed a midi click?
I have an artist I am struggling with getting from computer production-land to band-land...

Cheers and thanks!
Thanks Stitch!

Okay I'll tackle this bit by bit.
When we started out in the mid 90's I had been working as an in house "engineer" in a couple of studios working with bands, large consoles, analogue tape and midi sequencing on an atari st.
As a hip hop DJ I was using an akai s950 and vinyl and my brother Ross played guitar and keys. We naturally fell into our sound influenced by Massive Attack and a severe lack of decent U.K. emcees.
We then spent time demoing for the Various labels at the time and recorded "Trigger Hippie" with Skye at Rondor Publishing where we met Pete Norris.
Sick of hanging around for the labels while other "Trip Hop" acts were getting released we built a bedroom studio, aquired an adat, a small mixer, and tracked most of "WCYT?" in a bedroom in North London.
Once Portishead blew up we got signed in 1995 and moved to our long term studio in Clapham, South London. Here Pete installed a mackie mixer, another adat and a small amount of low end outboard gear.
The project studio revolution had begun and we took full advantage of it, our philosophy was a rebellious DIY one. I had seen bands waste so much money in commercial studios for Major labels and we wanted to run a tight ship, being on an indie also helped....... TBC.....
Old 29th December 2009
  #3
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ADATs!
Gotta love it.
I remember wanting one back in the day but the 7k price tag made my head spin!
Have you guys gotten rid of the Mackie now? Are you totally ITB currently?

Cheers and thanks for taking the time to do this!
Old 29th December 2009
  #4
Nice one!

Big Morcheeba fan, saw you guys a few times in the 90's, absolutely amazing stuff. And Skye, what a voice, what a stage presence! thumbsup




.
Old 29th December 2009
  #5
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thanks paul
Old 30th December 2009
  #6
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atma's Avatar
i just have to say that even though trip-hop was somewhat of a british fad (as seems to be the case with their 'electronic' genres, i.e., trip-hop, drum & bass, IDM, uk garage, grime, dubstep.. etc.). I still consider it to be one of the more timeless of such genres. I can still go back and listen to tricky or portishead or locust's morning light, (morcheeba!) etc. and really enjoy it without it seeming completely 'dated'. I've gleaned so much knowledge and influence from those kinds of artists and have an undying respect for them. Honestly i think there was a huge potential for the style to progress and it saddens me that it kind of died out. Seriously, what's more enjoyable than some dark, twisted, heavily psychedelic hip hop beats combined with singer/songwriter vocals? just my 2 cents!
Old 30th December 2009
  #7
.T.
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I have to admit I have been looking to jump ship from hip hop. This desire has been increasing in the past few months.

Trip Hop seems to be the perfect candidate. I need to hunt down my mandalay collection again, I have really fond memories of listening to these guys some 6-7 years back. Trip hop seems to take all the creative elements from hip hop and ditch the aggressive bull**** (and add some art back into it!).

Will report back from the lab in 6 months with sweet, sombre psychadelia that doesn't brush past 80bpm.

Who's with me?
Old 30th December 2009
  #8
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Stitch333's Avatar
 

Hey kats,
Thanks for the input and philosophical musings, but does anyone have any questions for Paul?

Cheers!
Old 30th December 2009
  #9
pan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
..., but does anyone have any questions for Paul?
Glad to be able to ask:

How much DIY was applied? I mean, how big was the influence of the different artists? Did they also work at home and brought ideas on ADAT cassettes or did they come with a guitar and you made tracks/programmings for them?

...and since this is Gearlusts: What exactly were those pieces of low end outboard gear?
Old 30th December 2009
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
Hey kats,
Thanks for the input and philosophical musings, but does anyone have any questions for Paul?

Cheers!
Being a gearslut I would love to know the recording chains etc for the various sources on that 1st album and the processing that was applied at mixdown (If Mr Godfrey dosent mind spilling the beans that is).

I understand that the Akai S950 was used extensivley, but any other samplers, drum machines, sound modules used?

Were all the samples from vinyl?

When sampling from vinyl did you go direct from the DJ mixer into the Akai or via any preamps or processing?

Vox - What mics & pres? Any processing during tracking? What reverb, compression etc was applied at mixdown?

Guitar/keyboads/synths - Amps/D.I, Mics & placement, preamps. What FX & processing during tracking & mixdown?

What mics/placements & pres did you use for live drums and strings? What FX & processing was applied at mixdown?
Old 30th December 2009
  #11
.T.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
Hey kats,
Thanks for the input and philosophical musings, but does anyone have any questions for Paul?

Cheers!
Oops!

Paul, Trip hop as a genre is noted for its use of soundscapes and atmospheres to set a specific mood. How did you approach non melodic elements in the Morcheeba tracks? Did you like to say, sample creatively from vinyl, or do live atmosphere recordings and mangle?
Old 30th December 2009
  #12
Nice one Guys, great questions and please keep them rolling I'll answer as many as I can later this evening when I'm done pro tools editing.
PG
Old 30th December 2009
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
As a full time professional act for over a decade, how has the technology affected your production style?
What was your first studio like and what is your current production rig?
Do you incorporate other studios, musicians, producers and engineers with your work?

Also, how have you found the best way to translate electronic records to a live performance with a band? Start with the drummer feed a midi click?
I have an artist I am struggling with getting from computer production-land to band-land...

Cheers and thanks!

I have had a few different sampling tools over the last 15 years.
On the first couple of albums it was the S950's for beats and loops and we also used an S3000 for spinning in vocals.
By the 2nd record we were also using 2" tape instead of adats.
The third record, which looking back took a strange direction, we got our first Pro Tools mix system and I think the learning curve and the new, cold sound affected the mojo we had previously enjoyed.
Then on "Charango" I went back to vinyl and hardware sampling with an MPC2000xl and an sp1200. I was very happy with this record.
For the last few records and the one we have in progress it has been a real mixture of live instruments and vinyl samples. I believe now after all this time I have finally achieved a good balance.
We have a Pro Tools HD system with Prism converters at present and I am happy with it for the most part. It's just the sub sample phase issues that annoy me.
I treat Pro Tools as a huge sampler, I don't really use Kontakt or Battery anymore, I just drag and drop into the arrangement window and fiddle around with it in there for pitch, velocity and pocket. I also cut up the live performances to achieve a hip hop feel that reminds me of the breaks and beats I grew up loving.
I don't use many plug ins either, it's mainly outboard processing and a hell of a lot of manual editing. The plugs i like are the glitchy ones that you can't achieve with analogue gear.

We have worked in some great studios....Electric Lady and Olympic to name 2. This was usually for stuff that we couldn't do in our own place for size or geographical reasons.
When we started we had a team of 4 of us in the control room as budgets and sales in those days could support the luxury of staff, but these days Ross and I self operate in our home studios most of the time.
So many hats to wear though as I am now producer, writer, mixer, engineer, editor and tape op in one, which has taken serious adjustment and time, but I like being hands on and not feeling bad about driving other people mad with my obsessive demands.
It also helps to keep what budget we have available for musicians which is always the best time in the studio for me.

Regarding the live concerts, we have never used a computer or backing tracks. The samples are triggered live by the drummer and I'll spin in atmospherics and scratches. We have worked with great drummers, keyboard players and bass players. Ross obviously plays the guitar.
I think a live performance is a totally different art to the studio and I enjoy watching people play instruments. I also prefer the sound of real playing at a concert.
We never originally wanted to play live but in retrospect being forced into it by the record company was the best thing we ever could have done to achieve the success and the loyal following we enjoy.

Cheers

Paul G
Old 30th December 2009
  #14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
ADATs!
Gotta love it.
I remember wanting one back in the day but the 7k price tag made my head spin!
Have you guys gotten rid of the Mackie now? Are you totally ITB currently?

Cheers and thanks for taking the time to do this!
Yup Adats were a curse and a blessing. I remember getting a vocal track back from Biz Markie and the adat machine eating the tape. Luckily Pete Norris was very patient and he straightened the tape out little by little until the information came back. I was nearly crying, it was the only copy.

The mackie went to a good home a few years ago and we have been through a few desks since. Right now at home I'm hybrid with some old 70's Calrec Side cars and a 32 channel Tonelux rack.
I would love the convenience of mixing totally ITB but I'm too used to the sound of analogue to let go just yet.

Thanks for taking the time to ask questions!
Old 30th December 2009
  #15
Quote:
Originally Posted by atma View Post
i just have to say that even though trip-hop was somewhat of a british fad (as seems to be the case with their 'electronic' genres, i.e., trip-hop, drum & bass, IDM, uk garage, grime, dubstep.. etc.). I still consider it to be one of the more timeless of such genres. I can still go back and listen to tricky or portishead or locust's morning light, (morcheeba!) etc. and really enjoy it without it seeming completely 'dated'. I've gleaned so much knowledge and influence from those kinds of artists and have an undying respect for them. Honestly i think there was a huge potential for the style to progress and it saddens me that it kind of died out. Seriously, what's more enjoyable than some dark, twisted, heavily psychedelic hip hop beats combined with singer/songwriter vocals? just my 2 cents!
I couldn't agree more. What has struck over the years with all these emerging U.K. genres is that Trip Hop is an incredible vehicle for songwriting and live performance.
The tempos work so well and the space they allow is very special.
Although it may no longer be trendy and it may have been re-branded a few times, the essence of Trip Hop is still going strong internationally.
Of course we all hated being pigeonholed by the music press at the time
Old 30th December 2009
  #16
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan View Post
Glad to be able to ask:

How much DIY was applied? I mean, how big was the influence of the different artists? Did they also work at home and brought ideas on ADAT cassettes or did they come with a guitar and you made tracks/programmings for them?

...and since this is Gearlusts: What exactly were those pieces of low end outboard gear?
Most of the collaborating was done in our studio spontaneously, the other sounds we did ourselves.

The low end rack gear was alesis compressors and effects,
a tla compressor and the (not quite so low end) Amek 9098 pres.
Other toys in those days were space echos and guitar pedals.
Old 30th December 2009
  #17
Thanks again and I'll get to the other info tomorrow. I'm all screened out.
Old 30th December 2009
  #18
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matucha's Avatar
I really enjoy reading this .


"The great Trip Hop era" certainly influenced me a lot. There were a lot of catchy loops and interesting sounds and I went trying to recreate them with whatever tools were at my disposal then (mostly just a tracker, few samples and some mangling plugins for offline processing). Those were great times.
But I later discovered that most of the stuff I really liked was not much more than a loop from some '60 song with a very few things added. That made me to find the originals and for some time my playlists didn't contain any stuff that was younger than me .

Of course there was much more about triphop than sampling '60, but it was one revelation that demystified a lot of tracks I really adored before. The lack of creativity was the most dissapointing. As far as I know, Morcheeba didn't fall in this category. I also thought it was an expensive production from the first album and now reading about how "project-studio" it was makes me smile. Good work .
Old 31st December 2009
  #19
I understand that the Akai S950 was used extensivley, but any other samplers, drum machines, sound modules used?

Hello Mate,

Not really. The S950's did most of the work.
Pete had a Roland Super Jupiter we sometimes used for pad sounds and bass. We also had a Novation Bass Station which we used.
Plus the S3000 I mentioned before.

Were all the samples from vinyl?

Yes pretty much, from breaks and early electronic music albums.

When sampling from vinyl did you go direct from the DJ mixer into the Akai or via any preamps or processing?

Direct in those days.

We would track with heavy compression and EQ.

Vox - What mics & pres? Any processing during tracking? What reverb, compression etc was applied at mixdown?

It was originally an AKG C3000, the 9098 and the TLA comp. Verb would have been a Sony delay into an Alesis quadraverb.

Guitar/keyboads/synths - Amps/D.I, Mics & placement, preamps. What FX & processing during tracking & mixdown?

We were so limited gear wise in those days. A lot of the guitar was just run direct from pedals into the Mackie desk with tracking compression and space echo. Synth sounds were also direct with tracking compression.
Any amping was either a small Musicman amp probably with an sm57 or an old Marshall stack.
Mixdown wise it would have just been as recorded with some manual fader rides, panning and possibly some verb and delay from the boxes mentioned.

What mics/placements & pres did you use for live drums and strings? What FX & processing was applied at mixdown?

Again we didn't have much choice on the first album so the chain was generally the same as the vocal one for most overdubs.
The strings were recorded upstairs at "Asia"'s studio as we didn't have a big enough live room for the first album. I can't remember the recording details for that session as it was a whirlwind. I always worried more about the String players timing than anything else.
Mixwise it would have been some Alesis Verb and Mackie EQ.
The live drums on "Howling" were done with 1 or 2 mics in a vocal booth and then looped in the S950. It then would have been tracked like any other loop.

So no fancy gear, just a mixture of songwriting, chemistry and a need to experiment with what little gear we had.
With hindsight it proves that technical excellence is definitely not the be all and end all.

Peace,

Paul G
Old 31st December 2009
  #20
Quote:
Originally Posted by .T. View Post
Oops!

Paul, Trip hop as a genre is noted for its use of soundscapes and atmospheres to set a specific mood. How did you approach non melodic elements in the Morcheeba tracks? Did you like to say, sample creatively from vinyl, or do live atmosphere recordings and mangle?
Hi T,

I used to create loops from old electronic music records, Ross would create drones or bubbles on synths (especially once we could afford an EMS synthi) and we would manipulate sounds through a roland space echo with the feedback and the pitch shifting.
I would also mess around with vinyl swooshes of synth sounds, spinning it backwards and forwards with the turntable not running.


Cheers

Paul G
Old 31st December 2009
  #21
Gear Head
 

Godamn! Reading all this great info, I think it's time to bounce down to some Trip Hop.

Living in UK for 4 years made me understand why this specific genre was born in that country and nowhere else. The only problem is that you need to be living over there to catch the right mood for this kind of music.

Anyway, Paul, how did you approach the whole song making process? I mean, did you went the normal HH route, i.e. going through record stacks, finding a couple samples and then dressing them up with other elements and finally bring vocals up? Or did you worked your way around with the songwriting first, then finding a proper tune for it?

I know that the answer will probably be both, but I had to ask this, as it troubles me much with anything I try to make outside the HH box. heh
Old 31st December 2009
  #22
Quote:
Originally Posted by kebzer View Post
Godamn! Reading all this great info, I think it's time to bounce down to some Trip Hop.

Living in UK for 4 years made me understand why this specific genre was born in that country and nowhere else. The only problem is that you need to be living over there to catch the right mood for this kind of music.

Anyway, Paul, how did you approach the whole song making process? I mean, did you went the normal HH route, i.e. going through record stacks, finding a couple samples and then dressing them up with other elements and finally bring vocals up? Or did you worked your way around with the songwriting first, then finding a proper tune for it?

I know that the answer will probably be both, but I had to ask this, as it troubles me much with anything I try to make outside the HH box. heh
You're right, we approach it many different ways but generally we will make "mood tapes" from other music we're into to get a feel for the direction we would like to head in. From there we write individually and as a team making sure the song works on an acoustic guitar before we get into production tricks.

We also write using musical loops and drum loops from vinyl to establish a cool feel and then due to the musical limitations of music loops we will rewrite the music, so harmonically it works the way we want it. Although Melodyne seems to be getting there in this department.

I find lyrics the biggest challenge of all. Trying to say something fresh or tell a story in such a small amount of syllables is hardwork.
It's the old chestnut of crafting and constantly rewriting to create something that sounds natural and effortless.

Hope this helps-
PG
Old 31st December 2009
  #23
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Hi Paul.

Thanks for finding the time to answer all of our questions. I have enjoyed all of the Morcheeba albums to date but the first one always packs an additional inspiration punch for me due to the project studio/DIY ethics behind it so it was great for you to offer us a greater insight into the recording process etc.

As you said yourself, "no fancy gear, just a mixture of songwriting, chemistry and a need to experiment with what little gear we had.
With hindsight it proves that technical excellence is definitely not the be all and end all". A lesson for us all there methinks.

Thanks again mate. Hope life is treating you well. thumbsup
Old 31st December 2009
  #24
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Stitch333's Avatar
 

Mega-gems!!

Thanks Paul!

Followup question to gear in your studio:
Whats the Calrec bucket you have?
The older discrete modules like the PQ1181?
Is the tonelux desk mostly for mixing and the calrecs for tracking?
As a gearslut, I would really dig some pics of the rig!

Its funny cause I know DJ Spo*** loved the Calrec stuff too.
He had a pair of the newer PQ1347s that a lot of Riddim Warfare was cut with.
He kinda held down the trip-hop on this side of the pond with that illbient offshoot for a while.

Thanks again Paul for taking the time to answer all these questions from the masses...

Cheers!
Old 31st December 2009
  #25
.T.
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Paul... a huge thanks for taking your time out to answer these questions in such detail. You've already given me some incredible food for thought re: sparking my creativity after a long period of being in a musical rut. It's fantastic to see one of the greats of the Trip hop world share techniques and gear lists with us lowly peons. We feel honoured!

Here's a few more questions

Regarding acoustic drums on tracks. Trip hop is primarily noted for vinyl-sampled drums, drummachines and that real detuned drum sound. How do you approach fusing acoustic drum kits with the trip hop mentality? For instance, Anders Meinhardt from FUKT (A Drum'n'bass group where Anders is the drummer) uses some creative methods like taping a splash cymbal to a snare to get unique, yet still distinctly acoustic sounds. Is this something you and Ross even consider, or do you just record the drums and treat as needed?

Regarding the future of trip hop and the 'bristol sound'. A lot of the progenitors of trip hop have left the original 'vibe' of trip hop for more eclectic post punk sounds. While the genre seems more fragmented than it used to be, where do you see the trip hop sound heading? Other, 'newer' genres such as glitch hop and dubstep that are emerging have a similar tempo and even similar elements or ideals as trip hop. Do you think there may even be a revival of the trip hop sound in the not-too-distant future?

Also, is Trip hop a dirty word? heh The name for the genre has more or less stuck by now (with 'the Bristol sound' coming shortly behind). Do you wince when someone refers to Morcheeba as a Trip Hop group?

Last edited by .T.; 31st December 2009 at 06:16 PM.. Reason: English not so good at 4am.
Old 3rd January 2010
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitch333 View Post
Mega-gems!!

Thanks Paul!

Followup question to gear in your studio:
Whats the Calrec bucket you have?
The older discrete modules like the PQ1181?
Is the tonelux desk mostly for mixing and the calrecs for tracking?
As a gearslut, I would really dig some pics of the rig!

Its funny cause I know DJ Spo*** loved the Calrec stuff too.
He had a pair of the newer PQ1347s that a lot of Riddim Warfare was cut with.
He kinda held down the trip-hop on this side of the pond with that illbient offshoot for a while.

Thanks again Paul for taking the time to answer all these questions from the masses...

Cheers!
I have a couple of old bbc calrec buckets with 8 pq10s modules in each. They sound beautiful. I also have a rack of 6 Calrec 1061's if I want a brighter crunchier sound.
Recently I have been tracking with 500 series stuff, Great River, Purple, Buzz Elixir's, Ma5's, Mono Gama's plus a variety of compression 1176's, LA2A etc. Plus a couple of Amtec, Pultec style eq's.
I intend to mix the new album through the Calrecs into the Tonelux. Also using outboard comps and effects. I am still learning to work hybrid so I'm really making it up as I go along. My latest toys are the Mpressor and the Culture Vulture which are doing wonders for the drums.
I'll try and get some decent pix of my home set up.
Cheers
Paul G
Old 3rd January 2010
  #27
Quote:
Originally Posted by .T. View Post
Paul... a huge thanks for taking your time out to answer these questions in such detail. You've already given me some incredible food for thought re: sparking my creativity after a long period of being in a musical rut. It's fantastic to see one of the greats of the Trip hop world share techniques and gear lists with us lowly peons. We feel honoured!

Here's a few more questions

Regarding acoustic drums on tracks. Trip hop is primarily noted for vinyl-sampled drums, drummachines and that real detuned drum sound. How do you approach fusing acoustic drum kits with the trip hop mentality? For instance, Anders Meinhardt from FUKT (A Drum'n'bass group where Anders is the drummer) uses some creative methods like taping a splash cymbal to a snare to get unique, yet still distinctly acoustic sounds. Is this something you and Ross even consider, or do you just record the drums and treat as needed?

Regarding the future of trip hop and the 'bristol sound'. A lot of the progenitors of trip hop have left the original 'vibe' of trip hop for more eclectic post punk sounds. While the genre seems more fragmented than it used to be, where do you see the trip hop sound heading? Other, 'newer' genres such as glitch hop and dubstep that are emerging have a similar tempo and even similar elements or ideals as trip hop. Do you think there may even be a revival of the trip hop sound in the not-too-distant future?

Also, is Trip hop a dirty word? heh The name for the genre has more or less stuck by now (with 'the Bristol sound' coming shortly behind). Do you wince when someone refers to Morcheeba as a Trip Hop group?
No Worries, I love sharing experience. Gearslutz has taught me so much. I grew up in a small town and pre internet there weren't many other local people around that were into sampling and production to talk to.

Recording drums it's whatever the track needs. I generally record kick and snare tuned to the track and then overdub hat's and cymbals.
We do mess around with dampening and micing to get the sound I want. I'll blend the real hits with samples to get it where I'm happy but to preserve the dynamics and velocity of the real hits. As I mentioned before I also do a lot of chopping and mashing.

Regarding Trip Hop, I'm not sure. I believe the sound will continue to be popular but really as always it is down to the songwriting and original ideas.
I have no problem with the term Trip Hop and I am as proud as ever to have been a small "part of the process"heh
Old 3rd January 2010
  #28
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Odey's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_G View Post
No Worries, I love sharing experience. Gearslutz has taught me so much. I grew up in a small town and pre internet there weren't many other local people around that were into sampling and production to talk to.

Recording drums it's whatever the track needs. I generally record kick and snare tuned to the track and then overdub hat's and cymbals.
We do mess around with dampening and micing to get the sound I want. I'll blend the real hits with samples to get it where I'm happy but to preserve the dynamics and velocity of the real hits. As I mentioned before I also do a lot of chopping and mashing.

Regarding Trip Hop, I'm not sure. I believe the sound will continue to be popular but really as always it is down to the songwriting and original ideas.
I have no problem with the term Trip Hop and I am as proud as ever to have been a small "part of the process"heh
Great thread. Thanks for taking the time Paul. It is great to hear about your production techniques and I have always been a massive Morcheeba fan from the get go.

If you don't mind me asking, what synths are you using nowadays? I have just purchased a prophet 5 and find the tone extremely pleasing and sits well in the background of a track.

And also, what glitchy plugins are you using? I try not to buy too much software but I would like to add some interesting effect plugins to my set up.

The guitar sound on Big Calm is awesome. I also like to use quit a bit of surfey guitars and guitar arpeggios in my music. Currently I have a fender twin, a gibson SG and a American fender Strat w/Rosewood board. Are there any amp/guitar combos that you guys swear by for laid back guitars? Or do you find that is more the room and mic? I have found the SG and Fender Twin combo to be a good surf combo.

Once again.. thanks for posting. It is great to hear from producers of music that are more in line with my personal taste in music.

Cheers

Odey
Old 3rd January 2010
  #29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odey View Post
Great thread. Thanks for taking the time Paul. It is great to hear about your production techniques and I have always been a massive Morcheeba fan from the get go.

If you don't mind me asking, what synths are you using nowadays? I have just purchased a prophet 5 and find the tone extremely pleasing and sits well in the background of a track.

And also, what glitchy plugins are you using? I try not to buy too much software but I would like to add some interesting effect plugins to my set up.

The guitar sound on Big Calm is awesome. I also like to use quit a bit of surfey guitars and guitar arpeggios in my music. Currently I have a fender twin, a gibson SG and a American fender Strat w/Rosewood board. Are there any amp/guitar combos that you guys swear by for laid back guitars? Or do you find that is more the room and mic? I have found the SG and Fender Twin combo to be a good surf combo.

Once again.. thanks for posting. It is great to hear from producers of music that are more in line with my personal taste in music.

Cheers

Odey
Hey Odey,
Thanks for the support.
Synth wise for pads we have been using a Prophet 5 but it has a voicing problem so it is in for repair. It is my favourite polyphonic synth I have heard so far.
We also use a Juno 60, an Oberheim OB-SX and Solina and Roland string machines which we track up.
For the weird monophonic stuff we use an EMS Synthi, an ARP2600 a KORG MS 20, a Roland SH09, a Moog Voyager, an OSCar and various other retro stuff.
We have also been using Hammond C3, Wurlitzer and Rhodes pianos and the G-Force M-Tron Pro Plug recently.

Plug in wise I tend to make use of Digidesign Synchronic, the SoundToys stuff, Pluggo & Hipno, Speakerphone and Altiverb. If I am using digital plugs I will also mess them up in the analogue world.
I also have a Waves Bundle which I rarely use.

The guitar sound is pretty much Ross' great playing. Big Calm was done very lo-fi. The Wah sound on "the Sea" was Ross playing D.I. with all the treble turned down on the Mackie desk. Otherwise in those days it was probably a Telecaster through a Musicman Combo or a Watkins Westminster if we wanted tremelo.
Over time Ross has aquired many different guitars, amps and pedals but traditionally he tends to play vintage Telecasters, Strats, or a Semi-acoustic Gibson or Hofner for bottleneck. Acoustics are Martins.
Amps are usually Marshall, Musicman, Fender, Vox, Ampeg and occasionally a Roland JC120.
To record the guitars I'll generally try a Beyer M160 ribbon, an SM57 dynamic (up close) and a AKG C24 stereo condensor mic (about a foot away). Most times the C24 comes up trumps. Unless we are doing something weird and fuzzy in which case we may just D.I. it.

Hope this helps!

Cheers

Paul G
Old 3rd January 2010
  #30
here is a couple of fairly recent pics of my home studio:
Attached Thumbnails
Trip-Hop from the Pros!-stoodio1.jpg   Trip-Hop from the Pros!-stoodio2.jpg  
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