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Your "A - HA" Moment Studio Monitors
Old 31st August 2009
  #91
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My first A-Ha moment. Learning that to achieve that fat sound heard in hip-hop music, you have to boost and cut the hell out of stock sounds ala Roland and Yamaha. You also need to resample kicks, snares, claps, and high-hats in order to use them to there fullest and to keep the sound intact when layering instruments. Using 3 or 4 midi channels for one kick or snare chews up resources quickly and sometimes the timing falls out of sync so its best to resample the sound you created.
Old 31st August 2009
  #92
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12ax7's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Most recent: mixing the ambience rather than the sounds. Building up a coherent holographic 'space' by pushing and pulling faders until it goes from 'nothing' to 'solid enough to touch'.

It's a delicate balance, until it isn't. Some guys will know what I'm talking about here.

It'll work for sampled/electronic arrangements as well, you just have to use two or three reverbs to construct the virtual space, then use your sends and pans to place your element in that space. Then you mix the spaces.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.

That's a good point.

I usually return delays & verbs to channels, and send small amounts of certain ones to each other, as well (watch out for feedback loops).

Sometimes, I'll even cut tracks of reverb, which (in hardware world) frees up boxes to do other reverb trips to create more dimension.

Ends up with a lot less feed from each verb in the mix, creating a much more lush (but not so obvious) feel. Much more natural and 3D.

But your main point is well taken: "...mixing the ambience rather than the sounds," as in: "Then you mix the spaces."
Old 1st September 2009
  #93
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A big A-HA moment was during my noise reduction mastering sessions, where I discovered better ways to clean up the audio without relying heavily on noise reduction plug-ins. A mastering chain that included expanders, paragraphic EQ, and just a tad bit of NR did a much better work.
Old 1st September 2009
  #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dp.movement View Post
A big A-HA moment was during my noise reduction mastering sessions, where I discovered better ways to clean up the audio without relying heavily on noise reduction plug-ins. A mastering chain that included expanders, paragraphic EQ, and just a tad bit of NR did a much better work.
...The idea being to do less violence to the signal by each element doing less, eh?

(Kinda like 4 people lifting a piano, instead of one trying to go it alone, and end up busting it to pieces.)

AH-HA!!!

Makes sense.
Old 2nd September 2009
  #95
Key
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Most recent: mixing the ambience rather than the sounds. Building up a coherent holographic 'space' by pushing and pulling faders until it goes from 'nothing' to 'solid enough to touch'.

It's a delicate balance, until it isn't. Some guys will know what I'm talking about here.

It'll work for sampled/electronic arrangements as well, you just have to use two or three reverbs to construct the virtual space, then use your sends and pans to place your element in that space. Then you mix the spaces.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.
I think I do. But honestly this has been my latest struggle as well.
Old 2nd September 2009
  #96
my biggest "AHA!" moment was probably the time i recorded in a big walk-in closet filled with clothes, i definitely didn't know what i was missing. then came the time when i tried recording in my room with packing blankets around me. i couldn't believe that i could have been doing that all along!

another notable "aha" moment i had was when i discovered parallel compression


EDIT: well i just had another "AHA!" moment

for some reason it just came to me that mixing with my macbook pro's built-in outputs is NOT a good idea, specially since i have an apogee duet and it is just so freaking portable
Old 2nd September 2009
  #97
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Storyville's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Most recent: mixing the ambience rather than the sounds. Building up a coherent holographic 'space' by pushing and pulling faders until it goes from 'nothing' to 'solid enough to touch'.

It's a delicate balance, until it isn't. Some guys will know what I'm talking about here.

It'll work for sampled/electronic arrangements as well, you just have to use two or three reverbs to construct the virtual space, then use your sends and pans to place your element in that space. Then you mix the spaces.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.

Seriously, do you need an assistant?
Old 2nd September 2009
  #98
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3rd Degree's Avatar
 

Honestly, finally deciding to soak up the cost of $1000 monitors. Even with my used Tannoy Actives that went for about $800, I wasn't hearing alot of what I was doing. Almost makes me wish I saved up more.

Outside of that, layering/stacking sounds. Not just drums, even samples and filtering/eqing and getting a bigger sound. That really opened up alot, my mixes were often clean but dull, I was able to bring more out. Big step when I really began to be able to do this effectively.

My biggest, not technique orriented, was to just realize to do things my way. I often was making beats to please fellow beat makers, only because I was around them more than rappers, and especially every day listeners.
Old 3rd September 2009
  #99
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frank lyon's Avatar
 

Watching Ken Lewis turn a knob on a GML 8200 strapped across the bus.
Old 3rd September 2009
  #100
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u b k's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storyville View Post
Seriously, do you need an assistant?

Lol! I got out of the mix-for-money game several years ago, I got tired of repairing crappy tracks in mediocre songs and working hard to get mixes that were 'acceptable.' I'm glad I did, because I ended up meandering into a different calling: making gear that helps people record and mix better friggin' tracks.

What I DO need are collaborators, people who want to work together on my music, their music, anyone's music, to shape it and get it to the next level *before* it's committed to tape. I do miss writing beats and mixing hip-hop, there's nothing quite like the feeling of when you get those drums to hit just right...


Gregory Scott - ubk
.
Old 3rd September 2009
  #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C Heat View Post
My A-HA moment was when I first heard "Take On Me" heh
A friend of ours is playing 2nd keyboards on their current tour
Old 3rd September 2009
  #102
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BradM's Avatar
Some of mine over recent years:

- Hearing Transient Designer on kicks and snares for the first time
- Putting Recoil Stabilizers under my monitors
- Getting my control room professionally tuned by Bob Hodas
- Turning off my DAW and recording and mixing to/from tape (so that's how you make drums and guitars sound "right"?!)
- Using a U67 for the first time (so that's why some mics cost big money!? I get it now.)

Brad
Old 4th September 2009
  #103
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Storyville's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by u b k View Post
Lol! I got out of the mix-for-money game several years ago, I got tired of repairing crappy tracks in mediocre songs and working hard to get mixes that were 'acceptable.' I'm glad I did, because I ended up meandering into a different calling: making gear that helps people record and mix better friggin' tracks.

What I DO need are collaborators, people who want to work together on my music, their music, anyone's music, to shape it and get it to the next level *before* it's committed to tape. I do miss writing beats and mixing hip-hop, there's nothing quite like the feeling of when you get those drums to hit just right...


Gregory Scott - ubk
.

Well hey man, I'm in NY so let me know what's going down. As long as I can learn something I'm always willing to check it out. Shoot me a PM.
Old 5th September 2009
  #104
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Gans Ja's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeyMike View Post
My first A-Ha moment. Learning that to achieve that fat sound heard in hip-hop music, you have to boost and cut the hell out of stock sounds ala Roland and Yamaha. You also need to resample kicks, snares, claps, and high-hats in order to use them to there fullest and to keep the sound intact when layering instruments. Using 3 or 4 midi channels for one kick or snare chews up resources quickly and sometimes the timing falls out of sync so its best to resample the sound you created.
Why resample? Are you talking about OTB mixing? because in ITB is more flexible to stay with layered drums (kicks, snares)and using submix buses. imo.
Old 5th September 2009
  #105
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Jonkr's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman View Post
Have any of you experienced that revelation or that "A HA" moment where you suddenly realized after much frustration and experimentation, the answer to getting the result you were after while recording and/or mixing?
And please let us know what that moment was.
Reading this thread

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/high-...ml#post4547239
Old 5th September 2009
  #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gans Ja View Post
Why resample? Are you talking about OTB mixing? because in ITB is more flexible to stay with layered drums (kicks, snares)and using submix buses. imo.
I'm talking about when I layer my sounds while producing a track. All my sounds are layered and eq'd then sampled so when I mix, there is really nothing else left to do besides vocals.
Old 6th September 2009
  #107
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staying phisycally in shape, taking time to have some healty food, going out every hour for 5 minutes changed my workflow so much in a positive way. that was an a-ha moment.

Besides that recording topnotch sessionmusicians was the biggest a-ha moment so far.
Old 7th September 2009
  #108
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u b k's Avatar
 

Here's another: aiming the vocal mic 45 degrees up towards the crest of the vaulted ceiling, and having the vocalist sing past the diaphragm from about 18" back.

Amazing blend of direct sound with the sweetest part of the room reflections. When you sing louder the voice doesn't just get louder it gets *bigger*.

Find the bloom of your room, and point the mic there.


Gregory Scott - ubk
.
Old 5th February 2010
  #109
Gear Nut
 

Major A Ha moment!

- When the OG's of GS tell you to treat your room.. DO IT!
- After the singer the MICROPHONE is the most important part of the chain. If it goes in good it becomes so much clearer of what you have or don't have to do.
- Good monitors make a HUGE difference! Whenever you see some one say " Oh just tweak this or _____ that", they can hear it way better than you can. Experience and good tools help alot.

I realize now that some advice is good advice, it's up to you to research and receive it.

The room and monitors are not the fun/sexy buy, but it will save you time and MONEY. It also helps your learning curve.

Just my 2 cents
Old 5th February 2010
  #110
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antoniosolo's Avatar
 

a ha

The moment I heard what compression CAN do to a track....vocals especially.
Old 5th February 2010
  #111
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Starshine's Avatar
 

Old 5th February 2010
  #112
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_G View Post
when people started buying our records and famous artists wanted to work with us.
oh and realising not to add low end to everything.
Did somebody say "buying records"!!!!
Old 7th February 2010
  #113
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gorillainthemix's Avatar
 

classic A-HA moment

btw....
Best. Video. Ever.
Old 7th February 2010
  #114
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5StarProject View Post
- When the OG's of GS tell you to treat your room.. DO IT!
- After the singer the MICROPHONE is the most important part of the chain. If it goes in good it becomes so much clearer of what you have or don't have to do.
- Good monitors make a HUGE difference! Whenever you see some one say " Oh just tweak this or _____ that", they can hear it way better than you can. Experience and good tools help alot.

I realize now that some advice is good advice, it's up to you to research and receive it.

The room and monitors are not the fun/sexy buy, but it will save you time and MONEY. It also helps your learning curve.

Just my 2 cents
The ROOM and then the mike
Old 7th February 2010
  #115
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phillysoulman's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Starshine View Post
what a corny and idiotic piece of garbage!!!!!!
Old 7th February 2010
  #116
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_G View Post
when people started buying our records and famous artists wanted to work with us.
oh and realising not to add low end to everything.
Morcheeba got that crack...keep up the good music ; ) My favorite is that "Blue Chair".
Old 7th February 2010
  #117
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Understanding how to filter my Synths to take off brightness was a big one for me.

Things like Tessla/Transient Shapers/Colortone also helped me big time getting the "warm" perception to my tracks.

I'm still waiting for my auto-tune/learning pitch A-HA moment..I cant set that thing to save my life (just for general correction)

Reverb on drums was a big one for me as well, in terms of bringing things to life.

Starting a track with a drumbreak then layering, revealed some goodness as well.

I'm all over the place learning this year.

EQ matching was a big deal as well getting a whole project to be more consistent...ahem.
Old 3rd August 2010
  #118
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Letting the mix breathe

My big A-HA moment was when I stopped limiting everything so hard on the mix bus to simply comply w/ my clients wishes to be very loud like such & such artist. Around '05 to '09 a lot of my clients were always asking for "loud" mixes where I felt like w/ a lot of my mixes I was forced to crank out a smashed & distorted overall sound. Some mixes sounded cool like that but others sound like there's a ceiling on the mix. A mix shouldn't sound like there's a ceiling on it! I mean where you can almost feel it over your head & hear the limiting artifacts. It kind of distracts you from the actual music/arrangements/musicianship/etc. I think on individual sounds/tracks in the mix, it's a different story.

After many years of heavy limiting I finally started backing it way off & just letting the music breathe & it seemed like everything just came to life. The transients sounded so good I couldn't believe I wasn't always doing this. The mixes still sound loud because they're not smashed to Mars. I'm no longer concerned if such-n-such engineer has a louder mixes anymore whereas before I felt I had to compete w/ that. I found that clients will go along w/ you if you believe in what you're doing. I have a new mixing style today where I use very light compression on the mix bus & refuse to really smash or over-limit anything (even in reference mixes--let the mastering guy obsess over that).

I do give the client a reference of the songs w/ L2 limiter on it but moderately & tell them that the mastering house can add more volume if that's what's desired. I try to let them know to listen & critique the mix & not the volume of the song. Since my new philosophy of mixing came about I haven't had a client challenge or disagree w/ me. Most of the time letting the music breathe is a good bet.
Old 3rd August 2010
  #119
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No Speak English's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysoulman View Post
Have any of you experienced that revelation or that "A HA" moment where you suddenly realized after much frustration and experimentation, the answer to getting the result you were after while recording and/or mixing?
And please let us know what that moment was.
at some time i told her just one time baby my penis is not so huge but very strong anyways i tried for a long time next u know it was darklike nineo clock at night,'she let me try so i pull my i phone to see the gap of the gluteous but first strong bad smell and the chocolate juice from hell A HA iyell! she said it hurst Also remember the ice cream early on? fu**k this chica loca
Old 3rd August 2010
  #120
Re: Your "A - HA" Moment

Had soooo many, but my fav is when I figured out how to make drum room mics go "kooooo,kaaaaaaa"

And when I figured out how to sync a lot of stuff together.
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