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How NOT to land an internship Reverb/Delay Processors (HW)
Old 11th September 2007
  #31
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t.dizzle's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by filterayok View Post
eh, i dont know. that first guy on the pdf was pretty funny, but it doesnt HAVE to be like that. The best/most accomplished guys i know were always the nicest to me when i was an intern. It was always the guys that felt they needed to PROVE they were somebody that said **** like that guy on the pdf. As a matter of fact, my boss who is SUPER accomplished not only put up with me expressing my ideas and opinions, but would consider them and encourage me. He always approached me like he was asking a favor when he needed something. Granted i've definately been treated like crap by some pretty big name guys, but usually people were pretty cool.
If you're serious about this line of work and actually make it to the point where you're in the room with the top-notch guys, then of course they're gonna treat you well. You've shown that your heart is in the right place and you're dedicated to the studio life. The tough talk/actions is usually reserved for the numbnutz who think they're platinum straight outta school.

But one thing must be considered - the studio isn't a very friendly environment to begin with. It's dark, cold, hot (near the racks), no windows or fresh air most of the time, you're listening to the same thing over and over and over again - and it's not even your music, extra long hours often with little breaks and even less sleep, moody artists, etc. - and you still have to be really, really sharp through all of that. If you don't have the balls to pull that off every single day, then you ain't part of the clique.
Old 11th September 2007
  #32
a hilarious movie about boss / peon relationship - Swimming with Sharks - with Kevin Spacey and Frank Whaley. Benicio Del Torro plays a bit too.

What gives you self esteem? Is it others saying "good boy" and stroking your ego? I'm not trying to belittle the sensitive people out there and I do think there is something to being civilized in a civilized environment... but let's separate biz and pleasure. Biz and friendship have nothing to do with each other. If you have a vision or goal, a place that you want to be in a couple of years, you will do whatever it takes to get there. If you don't want to do that, open your own studio. You won't have the clientele, the equipment, the experience, but its not totally impossible. If you don't like your boss, you can always kill him, but every crime has its time - as does getting a real job in the real world.

... Just always remember that ultimately, you are your own boss and you DO have options even if on the surface it seems like you don't. Be proactive. A proactive executive either started out the child of rich parents or a proactive mail room clerk. Are your parents rich? If not, start licking stamps b**ch. (sorry, the b**ch was just for educational effect)
Old 11th September 2007
  #33
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Great posts and great replies. I once compared lawyers careers with those of musicians. Even bad lawyers will get paid very well eventually, whereas good mediocre musicians will hardly earn. Lawyers are paid to perform in a intimidating harsh way. Who cares how they talk, they will be well off.
Now a relationship between someone who masters something clearly and a pupil is a great thing. Very few are allowing internships so it is great that you consider having them. Also you keep your craftmanship alive.
Old 11th September 2007
  #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by t.dizzle View Post
If you're serious about this line of work and actually make it to the point where you're in the room with the top-notch guys, then of course they're gonna treat you well. You've shown that your heart is in the right place and you're dedicated to the studio life. The tough talk/actions is usually reserved for the numbnutz who think they're platinum straight outta school.

But one thing must be considered - the studio isn't a very friendly environment to begin with. It's dark, cold, hot (near the racks), no windows or fresh air most of the time, you're listening to the same thing over and over and over again - and it's not even your music, extra long hours often with little breaks and even less sleep, moody artists, etc. - and you still have to be really, really sharp through all of that. If you don't have the balls to pull that off every single day, then you ain't part of the clique.
thumbsup

I think it's like any other relationship in life. You're first impression with a person kinda determines how you get treated. People let's not forget PEOPLE skills. You have to be businessminded and present yourself in a professional manner, but within those guidlines, Humans gravitate to people they like.

You have to make yourself likeable.
Don't come of as an asshole (Even assholes don't like assholes, that's why we each have only ONE.)heh
Old 11th September 2007
  #35
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Tibbon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by filterayok View Post
eh, i dont know. that first guy on the pdf was pretty funny, but it doesnt HAVE to be like that. The best/most accomplished guys i know were always the nicest to me when i was an intern. It was always the guys that felt they needed to PROVE they were somebody that said **** like that guy on the pdf. As a matter of fact, my boss who is SUPER accomplished not only put up with me expressing my ideas and opinions, but would consider them and encourage me. He always approached me like he was asking a favor when he needed something. Granted i've definately been treated like crap by some pretty big name guys, but usually people were pretty cool.
Who said Fletcher isn't a nice guy? He was just being unabashedly honest with the kid.

I'd far rather that someone be tough on the kid, and for them not to have any overly high set of expectations; than for the kid to come in and be promised a dozen roses his first day on the job and find that there were none.

I'd say that if you don't agree with Fletcher on this (at least in the point, maybe not in the technique) then I'm wondering how much commercial studio experience you've had? It's hard out there, but fun as hell. Too hard for me, I tapped out about 2 years ago.
Old 11th September 2007
  #36
Quote:
Originally Posted by filterayok View Post
As a matter of fact, my boss who is SUPER accomplished not only put up with me expressing my ideas and opinions, but would consider them and encourage me.
I was on a session (as assistant/co-engineer) where we had a work experience/intern kid sitting in for the day.

In front of the record company, the workie (17 years old, and to be perfectly honest not showing the slightest aptitude for assisting/running) decided to open his mouth and make a suggestion as to how the track could be improved, and why something sounded "not great" to him. You could cut the air after that comment - had he not been only with us for the day, he wouldn't have been back.

I've also seen an SAE grad openly criticise a client's track whilst interning at another studio - they were told to leave on the spot.

Making suggestions etc when unsolicited can kill the atmosphere in a session - almost for your own sake, as an intern it's good to keep quiet as much as possible. In private, when you really know a producer/engineer well, it's different. But that knowledge (of when it's acceptable to make comments/suggestions) only comes after a long period of time of listening and watching - hopefully by which point you've earnt the respect of your employers anyway.
Old 11th September 2007
  #37
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jbuehler's Avatar
 

I know a blond bombshell nympho with fake D's who is willing to turn a gain knob now and than..Looking for a internship...No education but good for moral.....
Old 11th September 2007
  #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tibbon View Post
I'd say that if you don't agree with Fletcher on this (at least in the point, maybe not in the technique) then I'm wondering how much commercial studio experience you've had?


7 years, everyday, one year intern, one year engineer, 5 years songwriter/producer. And i'm not saying he's WRONG on the points he makes, just that the way he comes off is definately like 'I AM STUDIO GOD.' I mean saying things like : MAYBE i have time for you, if i havent left strict instructions with the secretery to only forward calls from AnR's and important people,' seem slightly over-the-top. Either your busy or not.

There's a way to get the kid to understand that your not supposed messs up food orders or criticize peoples work without coming off like a deuche. I think MOST kids are so 'wowed' by what theyre seeing that they already think your God, so why keep pressing the fact?

The only intern that actually was told not to come back was a kid who messed up a lunch order and when the head engineer was pissed about it, the intern jokingly said 'deal with it.' That didnt fly too well.
Old 11th September 2007
  #39
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t.dizzle's Avatar
 

I've never seen an unpaid intern be forced to do anything. Maybe we're confusing terms. "Runners" get the food, cigs, blunt wraps, booze, clean and take out the trash. Where I came from, nobody said **** about nuthin' in the room - and the only staff person in there with the engineer/producer/artist was the assistant engineer. The runners came in to change the trash and empty the ashtrays, and the interns sat in the office bored.
Old 11th September 2007
  #40
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verb1's Avatar
 

September 11, 2007

Dear Ken Lewis,


My name is J Twin, and I'm very interested in an internship at your studio. I recently got out of county jail, am hungry, and am hoping your studio is well stocked with danishes or some **** to eat. I have never attended a recording school, but I do have a G.E.D. from Riker's Island and own a pack of URS plug-ins. I understand my credentials, or lack thereof, may be a negative, but I can more than make up for that with my hard work, dedication, and my willingness to pistol whip any muthafukka who comes into your studio acting trill. I am willing to clean, get coffee, deliver packages, go to Hunts Point for hookers, get coke on 110th, or any other duty required. I can provide references upon request. Just go Uptown and ask Pistol Pete, and he'll let you know I'm a thoroughbred gangster down for anything. Furthermore, if you don't give me an (paid) internship, I will take one - by force, if needed. Don't test me. Please consider my application for an internship. I can be reached on 174th, BX, if interested. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
J Twin
718-555-1212
Old 11th September 2007
  #41
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gsilbers's Avatar
 

i started doing intership later on in my life so I was really motivated on doing it. i was always jumping around from here and there trying to help and do stuff. which is something u always want to do in a studio anyways, find stuff to do without peolpe telling u but at the same time dont do others stuff or work on projects unautharized, but clean up files, closets filled with CDs etc. that sort of things. always offer your self on projects u think needs to be done in the studio (without offending)

I say that cause i been seeing a lot of intern just "hangin out" at the studio. unmotivated, just there waiting for the boss to ask them something to do.
not asking questions or showing interests. it shows that you are just "checking out" the studio world , maybe for the fashion/stardom who nows but it shows u are not clear on your path in life , thus, not very reliable in a long term relashionship with the studio.

and also not staying after or before there are sessions and learning on your own.

but as an intern in a studio you need to know pro tools inside and out. the faster the better but im not going to put an intern thats 5 minutes cheking whatsgoing on with the green "I" or how to loop playback to do a session.
Old 11th September 2007
  #42
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Ken lets be honest though... You really get a lot of emails from people saying they want to "grab a little internship from you?" I mean that's TERRIBLE, it defies not only logic but also common sense. I can understand some people just not knowing what to say, but the majority of the people that approach you are really THAT bad?
Old 11th September 2007
  #43
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by khameln View Post
Ken lets be honest though... You really get a lot of emails from people saying they want to "grab a little internship from you?" I mean that's TERRIBLE, it defies not only logic but also common sense. I can understand some people just not knowing what to say, but the majority of the people that approach you are really THAT bad?
Yes, generally speaking. This is representative of many emails i get. This is a bit to the extreme, however, not the worst one i've gotten. I have found generally speaking, litterally almost all of the emails i get from people looking for internships are absolutely dismal. Most of the time people email me like they are texting their friend. Often they do not even address me by name, like this email, often they dont sign their name, almost always the grammar is horrendous, almost always the email tells me how much they could benefit from the internship, but gives me no idea what they could do for me, almost never do they attach a real resume.

The reason i started this post is to inform/remind young people looking for jobs in this industry that if they want to have any prayer of landing a meaningful job anyway, they need to approach it in a smart, professional way. Anyone who thinks anybody would hire them to do anything with that approach is crazy.

the craziest thing to me is that this kid somehow landed an internship at a major label, and i seriously doubt he landed it without acting professional, and providing a resume. He came out of a reputable recording school, i cant imagine the school never touched on how to get a job. maybe he skipped that day. Funny thing is i just had a big meeting at that label today, wonder if he saw me.

And on the subject of interns being treated like crap. I'll say this about interns and assistants. If your on my session and your fcking around, or out of the room most of the time, or generally not there to really work...... your going to have a very bad day with me. If your there to work, and have a good attitude, even if your brand new, we're going to have a great session and i'll probably go out of my way to make sure you learn something, and / or i'll make it a point to tell the studio manager that you did a great job. but thats another thread.
Old 12th September 2007
  #44
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cynic one's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by J Twin View Post
September 11, 2007

Dear Ken Lewis,


My name is J Twin, and I'm very interested in an internship at your studio. I recently got out of county jail, am hungry, and am hoping your studio is well stocked with danishes or some **** to eat. I have never attended a recording school, but I do have a G.E.D. from Riker's Island and own a pack of URS plug-ins. I understand my credentials, or lack thereof, may be a negative, but I can more than make up for that with my hard work, dedication, and my willingness to pistol whip any muthafukka who comes into your studio acting trill. I am willing to clean, get coffee, deliver packages, go to Hunts Point for hookers, get coke on 110th, or any other duty required. I can provide references upon request. Just go Uptown and ask Pistol Pete, and he'll let you know I'm a thoroughbred gangster down for anything. Furthermore, if you don't give me an (paid) internship, I will take one - by force, if needed. Don't test me. Please consider my application for an internship. I can be reached on 174th, BX, if interested. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
J Twin
718-555-1212
hah!
Old 12th September 2007
  #45
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there needs to be a part 2 on what to do in an internship.
Old 12th September 2007
  #46
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Yall are acting like you are shocked and surprised at how some ppl are approaching studios for internships.

There are always going to be those ppl who just cant seem to get it when it comes to life, and have no ideal as to how to go about getting what they want, or how to ask for what they want.
And there will always be those who are born with the ability to know how to succeed when interacting with other ppl.

At the end of the day, you could have the best mixing skills in the world, and the best technical knowledge on equipment, and still not get the respect or the response that you think you deserve as an engineer because you act as if you were born in the jungle and raised in a cave, and have a bad grasp on human relations and on how to influence other ppl.

For those who feel like being some-what of a saint, you can explain this to those parties who send very "off" requests for internship work.

But then again, you as a studio owner yourself, have to have the ability to know how to deal with these ppl in the right matter.

If you dont got "the stuff" for such an action, dont bitch over the emails that you are getting... just click on delete rude-bwoi........ thats mordern-day technology at its finest.
Old 12th September 2007
  #47
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True, some of these guys will never get it.........

.....but some will. I mean, let's face it, morality and ethics, let alone proper home-training are out the window in the U.S. This thread is needed on so many levels beyond internship. Communication is VITAL.

In my experiences, I've learned that whatever you want to get into, whether it was getting a job, making friends, talking to chics, joining a fraternity, being accepted in certain circles...even joining a gang(yes I did that too *lol*) was that no matter what, PEOPLE HAVE TO LIKE YOU. And the way you gain favor, is knowing what to say, when to say it, and how. This must be taught at some point..or at least refined for those who were born with the gift. Some folk have never been taught better, or might've missed the lesson the first time around.

For someone at the professional level as Ken Lewis to make a thread on how to approach him and people like him is rare. Most people at this level feel like you should already know this stuff or have the old "learn it the way I learned it" school of hard-knocks attitude. To the wise: Take these jewels and run with'em.
Old 12th September 2007
  #48
Gear Head
 

when did this industry get about grammar and resumes? when did it get about going to an engineering school? when did it get about anything like that? isn't it about heart and raw talent....technical proficiency over TIME?

the average professional studio session may have a dozen people in there..and probably not a single degree to share between them...(unless legal counsel is there)

what ever happened to calling up a studio, finding out when there was a free moment between sessions..talk to the studio manager and start showing up..

the more you showed up and helped out, the more the engineers were willing to teach you until one day you either took the knowledge and applied it to your own thing or you got a job working at that facility

most of us who decided to follow this career path did it because we wanted to learn to make great music....not deal with egotistical assholes who've made the very silly mistake of thinking the music business was BUSINESS and not the business of making MUSIC...

to ken lewis and others like him who are willing to feed the young hungry minds of the industry..thank you...this is how our profession stays a profession and not an insignificant factor for the part time hobbyist or the next cheap parlor trick the industry decides is appropriate.....

now SUPERMAN THAT HOE!
Old 13th September 2007
  #49
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hehheh


Old 13th September 2007
  #50
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio syndicate View Post
when did this industry get about grammar and resumes? when did it get about going to an engineering school? when did it get about anything like that? isn't it about heart and raw talent....technical proficiency over TIME?

the average professional studio session may have a dozen people in there..and probably not a single degree to share between them...(unless legal counsel is there)
Your missing the point. Its one thing if your a paying client and are paying with 1 and 5 dollar bills. I will gladly take that client and that money. What i wont gladly do is subject my paying clients to an employee who might copy and leak their songs, who might speak out of turn in a session, who might show up late or not at all, who might show up high or drunk when they are supposed to be watching my back, or get high during a session. I wont put up with an employee who i dont trust and who cant act in a professional manner around my clients and my gear and around me. I'm not hiring a friend, i'm hiring a worker.

I have gone thru many interns over the years. That is the entry into this world. An intern i hired 5 years ago is still with me. he went from unpaid to full time paid, to now several gold and platinum plaques on his walls for engineering, as well as a Grammy. He now produces full time with me and we're working on some pretty big very well known artists. My last intern i hired is still with me, i hired him 2 and a half years ago. He's engineered for me regularly on major label projects, performed on major label projects, and now has a platinum album on his walls.

Needless to say both of my guys "get it". both work very hard and i try to create situations for them to suceed, build credits, earn a living, etc... and they both started as interns. People who look at an internship as some unpaid bull**** job just dont get it. i would not be where i am today if not for my internships that i did. An internship can be the single most important job you can get when your coming out of school or trying to get your foot in the door. many people dont take it with that level of seriousness.

I dont get mad every time i get a stupid or ignorant intern request. I started this thread to hopefully wake up guys who could "get it" before they shoot themselves in the foot. and there are plenty of good guys aiming the gun there right now and dont even realize it.
Old 13th September 2007
  #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mastermix View Post
I make those who want to intern for me read this gem I compiled from rec.audio.pro a few years back... starring a few Gearslutz regulars:

Am I Getting Annoying? and I got another question for the Music Engineers.
earning repect...yes...being treated like ****...I don't think so....giving the kid a kick in the ass....sure...also....we've all been that kid at some point...so relax!
Old 13th September 2007
  #52
Gear Head
 

i didn't miss the point at all, the things you're mentioning ken, can't be determined by simply a resume. it's something to weed people out, absolutely...but im sure you'll agree, it boils down to "feel", which you can't fake, can't have your cousin doctor up on paper, or be represented by a audio school degree or pro tools certification


but i've been in the professional arena long enough that anyone related to the music industry is strange brew to begin with...some of those very things you mentioned the getting high, the "keep it cool" nature are a lot of times the essence of rap sessions. (we little people still have to deal with unprofessional artist who bring their ENTIRE crew, enough guns for the showdown, and enough weed to make the dope boys millionaires)

i wont name the studio but i've been in a session where a now well known emcee took out 2 guns..laid them on the producer's desk...rolled up a blunt...and went to spit his verses..being 10 feet away you'd get a contact high...

i guess in the hip hop arena, potential interns feel like its a more casual situation...which is the bigger problem...lots of little craigslist $10 an hour mix tape studios and generic engineering schools pumping out thousands of "graduates".....people are losing their minds! dfegad
Old 13th September 2007
  #53
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Internship is by far one of the most realistic ways for an engineer to get his or her foot into the door for getting into this business. Especially if you can get into the right studio to do your internship.

I would have to agree with Ken on wanting to weed out who you can trust being in your studio, from who would end up being a complete waste of time.

With all that expensive equipment, and your business' reputation at stake, you cant afford to take any risks. Thats something that anyone who owns a commercial studio or any type of commercial business can understand fully.

And there would be no way that I would tolerate that foolish type of "Im tryin'a be gangsta" behaviour around my studio, or would I want any gang banger thinking he can come up in my studio and do as he pleases. I'd probably run my fist through his jaw before he would get the chance....
It doesnt matter who you are, or where you come from, when you are in a professional environment with other professionals, you have to act accordingly. If not then they can go find another studio to bother where the owner doesnt care.. and I can assure you that there isnt any professional studio like that out there.

Juvenile behavior of that kind belongs in the streets, not in a professional enviroment. Soon enough so called grown men need to know when its time to grow up and actually become a man.

Those who are applying for internships need to REALLY understand that they are approaching REAL professionals. They also need to understand that any attitude that they receive from a RESPECTABLE individual in regards to their internship request has little to do with being an asshole, or not wanting to help out a young person coming up, but has more to do with knowing how hard it was to make it to their position, and letting YOU know that getting into the business is not gonna be as easy as saying "Hey Dude, can you hook me up with an internship or a Job".

Remember the saying "Step Your Game Up" ?
Thats what you got to do if you wish to get onto a bigger level. If you want guys who are at a higher level to respect you, you have to be willing to step up to that challenge; And that doesnt include trying to act cocky, or trying to act as if anyone owes you any favours.

As far as internships go, watch the movie "Pursuit Of Happiness", and take a look at a movie based on a real life example of what an intership can end up meaning to someones life.
Old 13th September 2007
  #54
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Labs's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by filterayok View Post
It was always the guys that felt they needed to PROVE they were somebody that said **** like that guy on the pdf. .
Fletcher doesnt need to prove anything. Hes got gold-records, so if he wants to talk a lot of bull**** to a 15 year old confused kid on a forum, hes earned the right to do so..

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/gear-...goes-gold.html

Gustav
Old 13th September 2007
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labs View Post
Fletcher doesnt need to prove anything. Hes got gold-records, so if he wants to talk a lot of bull**** to a 15 year old confused kid on a forum, hes earned the right to do so..

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/gear-...goes-gold.html

Gustav
Was that sarcastic or sincere?

To be honest, I can't tell if Fletcher's post in that thread was sarcastic or sincere or not either. If anyone knows Fletcher's full name, it's easy enough to look up.

For all his cockiness, his comments are generally on point, regardless of whether his experience comes from working on legitimate albums, or just demos and vanity records. I don't know what his deal is, or who he really is, but I generally take his attitude with a grain of salt and give his opinions the benefit of the doubt.

However, I too would like to know what he's worked on. Maybe I'll like his tastes in practice, maybe I won't. It's all subjective, and quality is more important to me than record sales, one way or another. He could make records I hate the sound of and have gold on his walls, or he could make records I love the sounds of and have done nothing but demos.

Unfortunately, I have no idea.
Old 13th September 2007
  #56
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by audio syndicate View Post
i didn't miss the point at all, the things you're mentioning ken, can't be determined by simply a resume. it's something to weed people out, absolutely...but im sure you'll agree, it boils down to "feel", which you can't fake, can't have your cousin doctor up on paper, or be represented by a audio school degree or pro tools certification
who said i determine who to hire solely on a resume? But lets face it, if you cant get past "getting a job 101 - how to provide a resume, or approach somebody professionally" then i FEEL that you wont be able to handle working on my sessions. I feel that anyone i hire is going to go thru a common vetting process.....

1. provide resume
2. check references
3. possess the following traits as best i can tell..... Trustworthiness, work ethic, professionalism, desire to suceed in and make a career in the music industry, musical talent, i'm sure there are other things i take into consideration.
4. Have a phone conversation
5. Hold an interview
6. throw them into a session and see how they do

7. decide whether or not i want to hire them.

The minute an intern stops fully respecting you, they stop working hard for you, start slacking on responsibilities, then get fired. If that prospective intern cant approach you with respect and professionalism in the first place, how does that make you FEEL about how well they will do their job?
Old 13th September 2007
  #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Labs View Post
Fletcher doesnt need to prove anything. Hes got gold-records, so if he wants to talk a lot of bull**** to a 15 year old confused kid on a forum, hes earned the right to do so..

https://www.gearslutz.com/board/gear-...goes-gold.html

Gustav
Not to brag, but how good am I???? I'm almost tempted to make yet ANOTHER generalization and say that people who respond the way he did when called out on credits, HAVE worked on something semi-big, but it was usually one or two flash -in-the pan things back in '83 that they're scared wont back-up their studio-snob attitude, so they pull the 'i'm too cool to actually list my credits in the hopes you'll ASSUME i'm as big as your imagination will allow'

or, maybe i'm insulting Ric Rubin right now, who knows???
Old 13th September 2007
  #58
Mgr
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What goes around comes around...

Ppl dont need to be rude to be understood. Ppl dont need to be rude to do a good job, as a matter of fact the best engineer are people that can feel what you feel and try to go in your direction in terms of "intention".

Why engineer dont act with that "im god attitude" with artists ? because if they do so they wont work much....

I dont think they are "real" when acting like that with interns and they better try to be real and teach the interns how to be positive instead of how to be a jerk.

The best i've learned has always been with positive ppl with good soul, some are hidding at first and pretended to be "bad" and "tuff" but at the end they ended to be really nice ppl, i think sometimes it's just a waste of time to "act" as someone you're not..


& work hard
Old 14th September 2007
  #59
Gear Head
 

sometimes i just wanna say something, but like i learned in my intern days...sit down and shut up... tutt

what i will say is...i honestly feel a sea of change coming and some big boys are going to have a lot of little boy competition

learning curves are much, much smaller....and with guys like tony (if he ever gets his dvd together) are going to be having thousands of "interns" sitting in front of a tv...with real session files to practice on...(which is what holds many back from going from just okay to excellent given the right plugs and outboard)

definately work on your people skills, or get a damn good lawyer who can do the talkin' while you do the mixin'
Old 14th September 2007
  #60
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t.dizzle's Avatar
 

I know a lot of guys who technically know their ****, but still can't make a good record to save their lives. Technology, reduced learning curves, none of that matters. You just gotta have "it".
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