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Is hip hop gentrified?
Old 14th August 2020
  #1
Is hip hop gentrified?

Hear me out on this.

Hip hop was brought up on people using the gear they had at disposal and making great music with it. Most came and still come from less fortunate areas.

That culture was special because it was a pathway and avenue for less fortunate kids to make a name for themselves and come up without the best gear and or money for the best camera to shoot their videos and record their video.

Mainstream hip hop these days seem to me like fortunate pop stars who somehow got money from the label or were born into it and they buy the best gear possible, best camera and director to shoot the videos, and buy expensive cars and clothes all to flex in the music video. Repeat.

That is all mainstream hip hop is nowadays and it's honestly sad.

How do you think a less fortunate kid in new york, new orleans, dallas, etc.. feels when he sees a music video like for example the drake video that just came out like this. Saying nigga this, nigga that. Stealing the culture of hip hop and using his money to flex and spit in their faces.

What I got after watching the music video below is "hey I am drake and I have more money than you." He just didn't say that in the song.

This is the biggest artist in the world I must remind you. What happened to putting the ego aside and creating awareness about situations bigger than you. Especially in a culture he is using where the people who made it are going through serious hardships. Is this what we are going to accept just because the beat makes us nod our head?

Say what you want. It is a dope song but is this the direction you want hip hop to head? We should create a competitive environment but not one that is impossible for the people under us to come up. People should feel good after listening your music. Not feel like crap or feel like they must now have to chop off their damn arm and sell it or sell drugs to compete. That is what separates old artist like MJ compared to today. A great artist does need to brag about materialistic items to create a vibe. A great artist is bigger than just them. Because it is not about you.

A great artist is living for something greater than just them. Because it is not about you. You are creating a pathway for people behind you. Older generations seemed to understand this. Narcissism is embedded in this new generation. Everything is about them and their new car, body count on females they have slept with, jewlrery etc.....It's toxic.

Crazy how they actually tried comparing drake to MJ. The hell is Fat Joe smoking?

https://www.complex.com/music/2020/0...ichael-jackson


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Old 14th August 2020
  #2
Gear Maniac
 

1996:

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Old 14th August 2020
  #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lotuz2019 View Post
1996:

No hating ass **** either bro. Like that video is so damn accurate. We have everything one would possibly dream of for creating great music and these fools who are writing are just half assing it man and it's sad.

Real songwriters and real emcees have disappeared! It's WACK!
Old 14th August 2020
  #4
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

How @ sammmoxo old are you? I'm late 30s and honestly what Drake is doing is no different than 99% of what males are/have been expected to rap about since Hip Hop's genesis. Fat Joe is entitled to his opinion but it's not like his kids are bumping his classic ****. Drake is only comparable to MJ in that like MJ there isn't a person alive who doesn't know who Drake is. That's where the MJ comparison ends IMO. I ain't on the same page as these drug addled, special ed (not the "I Got It Made" one) rappers.

As long as there is a concerted effort to not allow artists to mature artistically, spiritually, etc. expect nothing more from today's "crappers," "talk-singers," etc. I keep saying that "It is generational gapped and divided and its anti-educational posturing limits cultural discussion and cannot totally serve Black folks. This dysfunction is tied to age-specific experience and expression. Because Hip Hop situates itself exclusively as a youth-identity rhetorical form, it will remain in arrested development artistically and will fail to provide an outlook which will serve the problems of the Black community. And it must then remain subservient to commercial market forces."
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Old 14th August 2020
  #5
Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
How @ sammmoxo old are you? I'm late 30s and honestly what Drake is doing is no different than 99% of what males are/have been expected to rap about since Hip Hop's genesis. Fat Joe is entitled to his opinion but it's not like his kids are bumping his classic ****. Drake is only comparable to MJ in that like MJ there isn't a person alive who doesn't know who Drake is. That's where the MJ comparison ends IMO. I ain't on the same page as these drug addled, special ed (not the "I Got It Made" one) rappers.

As long as there is a concerted effort to not allow artists to mature artistically, spiritually, etc. expect nothing more from today's "crappers," "talk-singers," etc. I keep saying that "It is generational gapped and divided and its anti-educational posturing limits cultural discussion and cannot totally serve Black folks. This dysfunction is tied to age-specific experience and expression. Because Hip Hop situates itself exclusively as a youth-identity rhetorical form, it will remain in arrested development artistically and will fail to provide an outlook which will serve the problems of the Black community. And it must then remain subservient to commercial market forces."
I agree 100% but I do believe change can be made.

This is the issue homie. The people in charge of this **** are not black and not about the culture. They are mostly white suburban men or women who don't have a clue. Check out "Trippe Redd" and "6ix9ine's" A&R and manager. ---> https://www.instagram.com/p/CDUMOHzha-G/

what would she know about hip hop? now tell me how the hell this girl got a spot like that.....^^^ and she is the mind behind this bs we are hearing and two of the biggest trollers on IG! Also she is the girl behind iann dior too. It's obvious she isn't looking for real emcees because she doesn't know what a real one sounds like. She is looking for trolls like the clowns she found because SHE DOESN'T CARE ABOUT HIP HOP!

It's time for a complete industry overhaul. The real mfs have to step up and bond together and get these ppl the hell out of the industry. Blackball, blacklist all silly ass trolls who do nothing for the culture.

There was a study in 2019 and it showed the newer generation actually likes older music better. It’s just that we are forced feed bs by these wack ass A&R's and gate keepers! They control the money, and they have the money to fund their vision and pay for the mass promo etc...

Drake is not an artist. He is literally manufactured. He is from Toronto, yet he makes Jamaican songs, UK drill rap, latin music.... like wtf?!

What bothers me is he acts and brands himself as if he created all of those cultures and waves by himself and he is all alone of this ****. Like take em or pac, they were on the grind and came from the mud to get their spot. Em He had help to produce the beat from dre etc but what he is spitting in all his lyrics is him 1000% and no one can take that from him. Drake copies cultures and takes these waves he finds and gets 40 and his camp to make it pop then he gets his team to pay for the best most expensive video done by mr x the director and get that other arab dude to promo and market it.
Take care was him but this new **** I hear from him sounds like a actor just stealing waves singing on a sony c800g. No effort into what he is writing or anything. He just knows it will sound good and get played everywhere because he has the money to do so.

He should market himself as a corporation. He is not an artist. Dude is literally just the face of a gentrified master plan that is it!

Hip hop is dead it's time to build a new genre! This is WACK!
Old 14th August 2020
  #6
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

Hip Hop @ sammmoxo will never be bereft of the Blacks and Latinos whom the music/culture was/is for but here's the thing, White (and/or Jewish, two different races) people have been A&R, label execs, etc. since the beginning but there is a diff between the Dante Ross and Faith Newman and Wendy Day (she is responsible for Cash Money's legendary deal and is "one of the good ones" follow her on IG at thisiswendyday and her husband Tony Guidry at iamthaconnect on IG) types and the suburban people of the current era whose only interaction w/Black people is meme/Internet culture.

I'm not confused as to what Hip Hop has been, once was and is now but the best way to define a "culture" is "transferring knowledge, ways (lifestyle), etc. to and from a people" and if much of what is passed down musically is ignorance, lack of knowledge (of self, and I don't mean in the "faux conscious" sense many rappers dabble(d) in but moreso Maslow "self actualization"), glorification of social ills then Hip Hop is as far from a culture than it has ever been.

Last edited by boombapdame; 14th August 2020 at 04:35 PM..
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Old 14th August 2020
  #7
Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
Hip Hop @ sammmoxo will never be bereft of the Blacks and Latinos whom the music/culture was/is for but here's the thing, White (and/or Jewish, two different races) people have been A&R, label execs, etc. since the beginning but there is a diff between the Dante Ross and Faith Newman and Wendy Day (she is responsible for Cash Money's legendary deal and is "one of the good ones" follow her on IG at thisiswendyday and her husband Tony Guidry at iamthaconnect on IG) types and the suburban people of the current era whose only interaction w/Black people is meme/Internet culture.
Facts! The formula still works homie. People will ALWAYS want to hear great music and a great song and are still hungry for real hip hop. Great artist and writers are out there, I feel the underlined line of what you said is the major factor. They gotta go ASAP! and they def shouldn't be A&R's!
Old 14th August 2020
  #8
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

We @ sammmoxo who care about the direction of something the pioneers didn't know how to have control of business-wise (separate from culture) should never expect those who don't care to care.

BTW LL is doing his part re: ownership so Hip Hop ain't dead it's the (c)rappers who are walking dead.
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Old 14th August 2020
  #9
Gear Addict
 

Music genres are always killed by their success.

That's ok, they live on in recordings and the underground.

- pioneers
- heyday
- sellout
- zombies

And again it starts.

Look at Metal.


Hip Hop was first hungry, then posing in front of its BMW, then it drowned in cough syrup.
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Old 14th August 2020
  #10
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Progger's Avatar
This is an interesting topic for sure. I noticed the wealth-flaunting in hip hop culture start in the late '90s with P. Diddy and Mase, and I thought it was really weird. The hip hop artists I always admired the most wouldn't ever emphasize flaunting wealth, as far as I know, and I'm talking about KRS One, Mos Def, Q-Tip, Busta Rhymes, even Dr. Dre. Nototious BIG was really closely associated with P. Diddy, but it seems like he never forgot where he came from, and he really earned every single thing he ever got.

I also think any Drake song sounds way less inspired and way more anemic than anything Busta Rhymes has ever done.

But there's no doubt that wealthy white people have done everything they can to use talented nonwhite people for as much profit as possible, whether or not any of that wealth goes back to nonwhite communities. It's vile. (I'm a white male, so I'm coming from a place of privilege when I say that, but I still think it's true.)
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Old 14th August 2020
  #11
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

Wealth-flaunting @ Progger goes far back than the late 90s, try the early 80s (YouTube "Wild Style" and watch the scene where Busy Bee's got money spread out a la Indecent Proposal minus the nude woman). If you look closely Hip Hop's gentrification began since 1979. I always wanted artistic balance and variety regarding what made/makes money but we all know how strategic (and no, not conspiratorial, as it was no secret that "gangsta" rap held the most market share starting w/N.W.A.) control over what gets marketed/produced didn't keep that a reality for long.
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Old 14th August 2020
  #12
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Progger's Avatar
@ boombapdame Those are all really good points. It's probably also worth thinking about that a nonwhite kid from a low-income community who was born with zero advantages under the American system finding fame and wealth... flaunting it could be seen as a sign of well-earned pride and self-respect. "I came from nothing and now I have a Bentley, what do you have to say about it." People from more privileged backgrounds, like me, might see that as tacky, and that right there is a sign of privilege. It's damn hard for anyone from a poor community in America to get out of it. Our system is broken as far as social mobility is concerned, especially for kids who aren't white.
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Old 15th August 2020
  #13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Progger View Post
@ boombapdame Those are all really good points. It's probably also worth thinking about that a nonwhite kid from a low-income community who was born with zero advantages under the American system finding fame and wealth... flaunting it could be seen as a sign of well-earned pride and self-respect. "I came from nothing and now I have a Bentley, what do you have to say about it." People from more privileged backgrounds, like me, might see that as tacky, and that right there is a sign of privilege. It's damn hard for anyone from a poor community in America to get out of it. Our system is broken as far as social mobility is concerned, especially for kids who aren't white.

I agree boombapdame!

and @ Progger Yea man drake is just really really good on his delivery which I think comes from being an actor but still something is missing. Overall I think the country in itself is just falling apart. I always said America is like a game of monopoly. We are in the end game of it.
Old 15th August 2020
  #14
Gear Addict
 

You guys know Strauss-Howe generational theory?

Culture swings from us to me and back over decades.

I think we've seen the most of posing in front of 800hp cars.


Especially after the crisis fully hits, people ain't gonna pay for ego displays any more.

(If it hits, I expect it.)
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Old 15th August 2020
  #15
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Originally Posted by Matteusz View Post
You guys know Strauss-Howe generational theory?

Culture swings from us to me and back over decades.

I think we've seen the most of posing in front of 800hp cars.


Especially after the crisis fully hits, people ain't gonna pay for ego displays any more.

(If it hits, I expect it.)
It's already hitting bro. Two of my girl cousins are now living with me, and their friends and them are doing onlyfans to make money. They don't know and I don't know what they are going to do.

It's getting bad out here.
Old 15th August 2020
  #16
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sammmoxo View Post
It's already hitting bro. Two of my girl cousins are now living with me, and their friends and them are doing onlyfans to make money. They don't know and I don't know what they are going to do.

It's getting bad out here.
I'm from Europe, we seem to be a bit later in the line to the executioners block.
Old 15th August 2020
  #17
Gear Addict
 

Good luck to you, sammmoxo, one good plan for girls is in my book - I'm 50 - to be loyal, decent, all around good to have around, and marry a man who is also just that and provides.

Not very en vogue, but no bad plan, judging from what I see around me.
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Old 15th August 2020
  #18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matteusz View Post
Good luck to you, sammmoxo, one good plan for girls is in my book - I'm 50 - to be loyal, decent, all around good to have around, and marry a man who is also just that and provides.

Not very en vogue, but no bad plan, judging from what I see around me.
Thank you! As I will need it and prayer.
Old 12th September 2020
  #19
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jm2c's Avatar
 

Is hip hop gentrified? Isn't it obvious from browsing this subforum - everyone concerned about the sound of their vox & their "808s" instead of the message/ideas. Everyone flashing off material wealth and status instead of spreading positive party vibes. Lyrics about Me more than about We

If that isnt taking what was there and just using it as a marketing vehicle, dunno what is
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Old 12th September 2020
  #20
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Antagonist's Avatar
I honestly felt the need to comment because of the overall tone of the post, and some pretty inaccurate assumptive information on the OT/OP.

Times are always going to change, styles are always going to change, and what was popular in the past may/may not be popular again one day.... but gentrification and not liking the "new hip hop" are two completely different things. There's enough cultural and racial divide these days, we don't need to confuse the two.

Few points
1. Music period has always been gentrified, it's not just hip hop.

2. Corporations have been running mainstream for decades now, and the industry is controlled by them. Music is a business like anything else. Whatever it takes to sell products, and fit certain agendas (Of those with the $/Power) it's going to be done.

3. Sadly the days of discovering raw unheard talent, and true musical geniuses in popular music are long gone. Speed, cost, efficiency, and image run the game. But like I said in #2 That's just business in general, not music.

4. Good music is still made all the time, it's just not force-fed down peoples throats by huge marketing machines, so you rarely hear of it. I guarantee if you go search the internet for 20 minutes under "boom bap, lyrical hip hop, etc." you can find some really good hip hop easily.

5. Like it or not... 90's type gritty lyrical hip hop doesn't mesh with a good portion of the music listening public. It definitely doesn't fit a lot of the millennial generations musical taste. Go and have a conversation with some teenagers, and I guarantee you'll find very little respect for musical history. They want what's hot now, and today. They want what all their friends like, because it's become a social media culture. Oh yeah and that will change tomorrow when they want something else. WHICH brings me to my next point...

6. Most of these new artists history of hip hop goes back to when they were BORN... which is approx Lil Wayne's 2000's run, the Chicago drill movement, or the more recent ATL Trap takeover. That's all they've grown up on, so that's why their sounds seem to be further extensions of that type of music. You can't expect a kid who never heard Mobb Deep, to make a QB sounding banger. Why do you think even a lot of NYC artists sound "drill" or "trap" these days? New York's biggest two hip hop artists in a long time Pop Smoke, and 69ine sound nothing like traditional hip hop.

7. Our culture as a whole's attention span has been getting shorter and shorter. This isn't just in music, but also in all forms of media. For music though, that's why songs have gotten to be around 2:30-3mins, simple 16 bar switches, lots of sound effects, and repetitive bars. People are bombarded with so much media, the only way to get them to vibe to something is to make it simple, catchy, and quick. But to be frank... that's been a popular music formula for years, not just hip hop. Cohesive albums by all accounts have been pretty dead for a while. Songs and singles is what matters, albums will live by the individual songs. Sad but true.

Couple things I felt needed to be pointed out as wrong in your post though:

1. Drake has tremendous talent. I don't care how strong your marketing team is, you don't get to that point by accident. Just because they shove his most popular songs down your throat, his catalog/features/mixtapes deserve their place in hip hop history.
Did you ever think they released Pop Star video now because the world could just use some light-hearted entertainment, in the midst of all this chaos?

2. Internet Money/Taz Taylor, and 10k Records/Lil Tecca, Trippie Redd, etc are a tremendously hot brand right now. This girl you speak of.. her name is Molly McLachlan and she may not look like anything to you, but I guarantee the story isn't how you portray it. Since once again this IS a business, she was one of the head A&R's at 10k records. She found a couple artists online that became big, she justified her label position, and now that whole group of people is making moves. Taz Taylor is hated so much, but the dude basically re-wrote online beat sales, and turned that into a multi-million dollar record label. AND Taz/Internet Money are somewhat responsible for the trend in popular hip hop these days. Their type-beat and assembly-line formula completely fits the 2020 industry model, of mass supply and consumption.
***PS woman influencers have been quietly (and not so quietly) pulling strings behind the scenes for years which is also why a lot of the "Hard" hip hop isn't popular anymore. Drake said years ago that the tastemakers were women. A lot of the biggest artists managers, A&R's these days are females. That's a great thing in a business that was historically male dominated.

3. There is some REALLY GOOD "hip-hop" albums right now. Just in past couple weeks we've had: Nas Kings Disease, Big Sean Detroit 2, The Lox new album, Run the Jewels 2, Conway the Machine just dropped From a King to A God. Don't forget Dave East, Westside Gunn, Kendrick Lamar, Chance the Rapper. If you don't think there's good lyrical/90's reminiscent hip hop these days, you're not looking hard enough.

With that being said, I come from that generation as well and I listen to more new stuff than the old stuff. Why? Because I can always appreciate the history and quality of what's come before, but I also like to hear all the new takes on this art form that come every year. Lil Baby and Da Baby have great projects for the new new school. 2 Chainz reinvented himself flawlessly, and Future has been consistent too. Rick Ross has one of the best ear for beats ever, and a flow to match. Lil Wayne is one of the greats, so is Kanye. I'll never say the art died with Big and Pac, like so many other people of our generation that I speak to.

My Theory:

Pointing to gentrification as the reason you don't like modern hip-hop is a complete cop out. Because like i said in the first paragraph of my post, music as a whole was gentrified LONG before hip hop. Like back before Elvis stole Southern Soul.... like way way back when White artists were stealing Negro spirituals and giving no credit.... like WAY WAY back when composers in Europe were stealing African and Latin musicianship. Way long before hip hop was even a glimmer in the universe.

It all simply comes down to the fact that it's been 41 years, and over time Hip Hop/Rap Music surpassed a lot of genre's, and became one of the world's most popular. Because of this, many sub-genre's grew, and overtime the popular sound of the genre as a whole changed. Bottom line is what was once "Raw Underground Expressive Art" done by a few people on the blocks of NYC, has blossomed into one of the most commercial and lucrative businesses in the world. It's not something to hate, it's actually something to embrace. Like that child that grew up from humble beginnings, and became a billionaire success. We can either applaud, or be jealous point fingers, and hate.

I've chose to embrace it, and all of it's sub-cultures. From the rainbow colored craziness, to the drug-induced mumbles, to the new school of lyricists. It's all entertainment to me, as it should be. My motto has always been to applaud anybody making a living doing what they love.
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Old 13th September 2020
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

I would say its commercialized, not necessarily gentrified.

Rap has been commercialized for a long time ever since Record labels realized how profitable it was.

This trend started as far back as the late 80s-early 90s.

I'd think some of the problems we are hearing though is Rap catering to younger folks (which it always did), which is an entirely new generation.

Rap has had audiences from Boomers to post millenials. So tastes will be different. Kind of like Rock (which did get gentrificatied).
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Old 13th September 2020
  #22
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s.d.finley's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matteusz View Post
Music genres are always killed by their success.

That's ok, they live on in recordings and the underground.

- pioneers
- heyday
- sellout
- zombies

And again it starts.

Look at Metal.


Hip Hop was first hungry, then posing in front of its BMW, then it drowned in cough syrup.
Dang look at Jazz, or even Country music. Both are totally dumbed down and whitewashed gentrified and have been for a loooong time.

Also no more promethazine to be had nowadays unless its NOS. I live in The City of Syrup.
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Old 13th September 2020
  #23
Quote:
Originally Posted by sammmoxo View Post
.

There was a study in 2019 and it showed the newer generation actually likes older music better. It’s just that we are forced feed bs by these wack ass A&R's and gate keepers! They control the money, and they have the money to fund their vision and pay for the mass promo etc...
https://www.rollingstone.com/pro/fea...ustry-1056229/

If the last 3 Gate Keepers really do divide into 2 elements, then the one that focuses on new music/artists will have a harder time controlling the money. Whoever they sign or promote will have to not only generate streaming numbers but also put together a real catalog that can generate streams in the long run.

Also on paper they have to show that the money the other half puts up is worth investing.

Because once the investors really do take over, like all corporations quarterly earnings trump everything.
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Old 13th September 2020
  #24
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
There was a study in 2019 and it showed the newer generation actually likes older music better.
A few drinks later always the old stuff come on the stereo, yes.

But the music industry is selling an image, identification, all that.

It's very much necessary for the young.

They can relate to the old songs, but not to the old singers.
Old 13th September 2020
  #25
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by s.d.finley View Post
Dang look at Jazz, or even Country music. Both are totally dumbed down and whitewashed gentrified and have been for a loooong time.

Also no more promethazine to be had nowadays unless its NOS. I live in The City of Syrup.
Yea, but the good news is..

Quote:
if you go search
..you find the good stuff.

As they say, the TV is a weapon YOU point at yourself.




What's NOS?
Old 13th September 2020
  #26
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Michael T's Avatar
It all started when the South, not all, Outkast/Three Six Mafia being a couple of exceptions, started bling bling rapping aka Cash Money/UGK etc. Granted the North and West Coast rappers glorified bling but in a different way. They taught you the consequences of living that lifestyle. Outkast/Three Six Mafia did too just to give the South credit because not all mainstream Southern folks were bling bling rappers. The music industry, seeing that Napster killed the game, simply gave up. They don't give a f$^$ anymore and why would they. The old model with huge budgets bring in no money because of no physical sales. Politics wise, which I will not say much, is a whole different fiasco. The quality rappers see that as it's no use because the radio is bought out buy the industry. The industry don't want Tupacs, DMX etc mature rappers that preach while rapping as they don't fit the worldwide agenda. They want mindless degenerates on the radio. Little 15 year old bums who refuse to grow up slow with no education. Old bums who never had a real job in their life like Nicki Minaj and Megan the Stallion etc. They do whatever it takes to please the industry's poison because they will never work a 9 to 5. They will do whatever it takes, yes even that...to get ahead. That's the whole idea behind the industry as this point and that includes the movie industry as well. Imagine a grown ass man 50 years old still rapping who never had a real job in his life. All he ever did was schemed, pimped hoes and sold dope. That's what they are pushing in the game now and it keeps the powers that be filthy rich especially the court system lol ...oops I said enough maybe too much.

Last edited by Michael T; 13th September 2020 at 04:54 PM..
Old 13th September 2020
  #27
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Michael T's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antagonist View Post
I honestly felt the need to comment because of the overall tone of the post, and some pretty inaccurate assumptive information on the OT/OP.

Times are always going to change, styles are always going to change, and what was popular in the past may/may not be popular again one day.... but gentrification and not liking the "new hip hop" are two completely different things. There's enough cultural and racial divide these days, we don't need to confuse the two.

Few points
1. Music period has always been gentrified, it's not just hip hop.

2. Corporations have been running mainstream for decades now, and the industry is controlled by them. Music is a business like anything else. Whatever it takes to sell products, and fit certain agendas (Of those with the $/Power) it's going to be done.

3. Sadly the days of discovering raw unheard talent, and true musical geniuses in popular music are long gone. Speed, cost, efficiency, and image run the game. But like I said in #2 That's just business in general, not music.

4. Good music is still made all the time, it's just not force-fed down peoples throats by huge marketing machines, so you rarely hear of it. I guarantee if you go search the internet for 20 minutes under "boom bap, lyrical hip hop, etc." you can find some really good hip hop easily.

5. Like it or not... 90's type gritty lyrical hip hop doesn't mesh with a good portion of the music listening public. It definitely doesn't fit a lot of the millennial generations musical taste. Go and have a conversation with some teenagers, and I guarantee you'll find very little respect for musical history. They want what's hot now, and today. They want what all their friends like, because it's become a social media culture. Oh yeah and that will change tomorrow when they want something else. WHICH brings me to my next point...

6. Most of these new artists history of hip hop goes back to when they were BORN... which is approx Lil Wayne's 2000's run, the Chicago drill movement, or the more recent ATL Trap takeover. That's all they've grown up on, so that's why their sounds seem to be further extensions of that type of music. You can't expect a kid who never heard Mobb Deep, to make a QB sounding banger. Why do you think even a lot of NYC artists sound "drill" or "trap" these days? New York's biggest two hip hop artists in a long time Pop Smoke, and 69ine sound nothing like traditional hip hop.

7. Our culture as a whole's attention span has been getting shorter and shorter. This isn't just in music, but also in all forms of media. For music though, that's why songs have gotten to be around 2:30-3mins, simple 16 bar switches, lots of sound effects, and repetitive bars. People are bombarded with so much media, the only way to get them to vibe to something is to make it simple, catchy, and quick. But to be frank... that's been a popular music formula for years, not just hip hop. Cohesive albums by all accounts have been pretty dead for a while. Songs and singles is what matters, albums will live by the individual songs. Sad but true.

Couple things I felt needed to be pointed out as wrong in your post though:

1. Drake has tremendous talent. I don't care how strong your marketing team is, you don't get to that point by accident. Just because they shove his most popular songs down your throat, his catalog/features/mixtapes deserve their place in hip hop history.
Did you ever think they released Pop Star video now because the world could just use some light-hearted entertainment, in the midst of all this chaos?

2. Internet Money/Taz Taylor, and 10k Records/Lil Tecca, Trippie Redd, etc are a tremendously hot brand right now. This girl you speak of.. her name is Molly McLachlan and she may not look like anything to you, but I guarantee the story isn't how you portray it. Since once again this IS a business, she was one of the head A&R's at 10k records. She found a couple artists online that became big, she justified her label position, and now that whole group of people is making moves. Taz Taylor is hated so much, but the dude basically re-wrote online beat sales, and turned that into a multi-million dollar record label. AND Taz/Internet Money are somewhat responsible for the trend in popular hip hop these days. Their type-beat and assembly-line formula completely fits the 2020 industry model, of mass supply and consumption.
***PS woman influencers have been quietly (and not so quietly) pulling strings behind the scenes for years which is also why a lot of the "Hard" hip hop isn't popular anymore. Drake said years ago that the tastemakers were women. A lot of the biggest artists managers, A&R's these days are females. That's a great thing in a business that was historically male dominated.

3. There is some REALLY GOOD "hip-hop" albums right now. Just in past couple weeks we've had: Nas Kings Disease, Big Sean Detroit 2, The Lox new album, Run the Jewels 2, Conway the Machine just dropped From a King to A God. Don't forget Dave East, Westside Gunn, Kendrick Lamar, Chance the Rapper. If you don't think there's good lyrical/90's reminiscent hip hop these days, you're not looking hard enough.

With that being said, I come from that generation as well and I listen to more new stuff than the old stuff. Why? Because I can always appreciate the history and quality of what's come before, but I also like to hear all the new takes on this art form that come every year. Lil Baby and Da Baby have great projects for the new new school. 2 Chainz reinvented himself flawlessly, and Future has been consistent too. Rick Ross has one of the best ear for beats ever, and a flow to match. Lil Wayne is one of the greats, so is Kanye. I'll never say the art died with Big and Pac, like so many other people of our generation that I speak to.

My Theory:

Pointing to gentrification as the reason you don't like modern hip-hop is a complete cop out. Because like i said in the first paragraph of my post, music as a whole was gentrified LONG before hip hop. Like back before Elvis stole Southern Soul.... like way way back when White artists were stealing Negro spirituals and giving no credit.... like WAY WAY back when composers in Europe were stealing African and Latin musicianship. Way long before hip hop was even a glimmer in the universe.

It all simply comes down to the fact that it's been 41 years, and over time Hip Hop/Rap Music surpassed a lot of genre's, and became one of the world's most popular. Because of this, many sub-genre's grew, and overtime the popular sound of the genre as a whole changed. Bottom line is what was once "Raw Underground Expressive Art" done by a few people on the blocks of NYC, has blossomed into one of the most commercial and lucrative businesses in the world. It's not something to hate, it's actually something to embrace. Like that child that grew up from humble beginnings, and became a billionaire success. We can either applaud, or be jealous point fingers, and hate.

I've chose to embrace it, and all of it's sub-cultures. From the rainbow colored craziness, to the drug-induced mumbles, to the new school of lyricists. It's all entertainment to me, as it should be. My motto has always been to applaud anybody making a living doing what they love.
You said "Having women in the place of men as A&Rs is a good thing". Well I beg to differ. Just from the sheer history and nature of mankind, we all know the danger in that. Women are highly sexualized for one. Two. We all know how many men give beautiful women positions just cause...just look at you HR Department at most jobs...lol seriously frfr. This generation has a horrible reputation for having children out of wedlock aka the "baby mama drama". So imagine having "those" type women making decisions for " men"...hey I think we may have solved some issues right their seeing that 99 percent of the current rappers on the radio come from single parent homes where they are being raised by their drama queen mothers...

Last edited by Michael T; 14th September 2020 at 04:22 AM..
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Old 14th September 2020
  #28
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sammmoxo View Post
I
Not feel like crap or feel like they must now have to chop off their damn arm and sell it or sell drugs to compete
This speaks more to the character of the listener than it does to the artist. If someone is watching a video or listening to a song and feels "less than" because a person is boasting about what they have, then that listener needs to reevaluate their priorities. Boastfulness in song is very much not only a "black' thing, it is an AFRICAN thing. In various African tribes, it was and still is common for males to boast of their wealth, physical prowess, strength, etc... in song and in dance. This is not meant to denigrate others. It is meant to be a celebration of that person, and the listener is meant to celebrate WITH the person singing and dancing. It's part of a ritual, part of courting, part of coming of age in certain tribes.
If our children are listening to modern rap and feeling like they need to sell drugs to "keep up", we are raising our children in an incorrect manner. It isn't the artist's responsibility to make sure that our kids feel good about themselves.

And this is coming from a dude who can't ****ing stand Drake
Old 14th September 2020
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lionaudio View Post
If someone is watching a video or listening to a song and feels "less than" because a person is boasting about what they have, then that listener needs to reevaluate their priorities.
Myself feels bored to death about it.

It was kinda cool in the early 90s, ok.

He can have his super cars, no jealousy, though most of those cars in videos are rented anyway.



It's just gotten so L.A.M.E.
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Old 14th September 2020
  #30
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

Have @ Michael T you forgot? Rappers showed off bling since Slick Rick w/the dinner plate chain and Eric B & Rakim but they didn't rap about it as a focal point like Cash Money. Also, I'm a Black woman and honestly there is nothing wrong w/women (mainly if they are of my ethnicity and not White) being A&R's if their position was/is merit based and not looks based although the latter can be a bonus thrown in w/merit in an industry where looks matter to the point of exclusion.

BTW men are conditioned to be way more hypersexualized than women could ever be. Women, especially if Black, still get penalized for being it, whether playing a role to fit an agenda or not.
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