The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
a beat making newbie has appeared
Old 2 weeks ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

a beat making newbie has appeared

Aye Yoooooo. so a friend i have wants me to make him a beat........ i said yes. its been a few days and im pretty lost. ive tried piecing some thing together in reaper. but no luck. he wants a NF- the search type beat using final fantasy XV apocalypsis noctis as a sample. im so new to beat making that need help guys.

thanks MRiLenT a.k.a LazyManDoes
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Quote:
friend i have wants me to make him a beat........ i said yes. its been a few days and im pretty lost. ive tried piecing some thing together in reaper. but no luck. he wants a NF- the search type beat using final fantasy XV apocalypsis noctis as a sample.
I do not know if this is a joke, but If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.

Its going to take you years to learn what you are trying to do. There are so many little things to know (knowledge) and not to mention the skills needed.

Its like picking up a paint brush for the 1st time and expecting to paint the Mona Lisa. Making music is an art, just like painting.

It will take you years and even decades to learn.
I hope your friend has patience...
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Nut
Sampling can be tricky, but something to start out is by knowing where to put certain elements. If you have a snare/clap, but it on the 2 and 4. If you're double timing it, put it on the 3 and only the 3. That's where that goes. No point in trying to get fancy if you don't know what you're doing. Put it on the 2 and 4 and you should be good. Put the kick on the 1 and 3 and you can really get creative with where else you put it. When you go to add melodies or whatnot, put on a loop and try to play something within that loop that when it starts again, it sounds good. Think of it like a GIF that you can't tell where it starts and ends and it looks infinite, that's what you want.

Yes, it's an art, but every art can be broken down into a science and we can identify elements of it and train them. I had no real musical training and I don't know music theory and yet I can make beats with no real issue because I'm a scientist and my skill is analyzing things, not necessarily being super creative. If you are creative, great, it'll come in handy, if not, it's not a huge deal. Da Vinci was one of the greatest painters to ever live but when you look at how he constructed his works, it wasn't this super "Oh, I see it in my mind" kind of thing. The dude was insanely meticulous and he planned out each and every part of the things he did. His drawings, paintings, inventions, they had schematics. I model my stuff after him. I can't go in and play a piano like many guys here can. I can't play any instruments, but when you know the rules that things must follow, that doesn't matter.

I don't use a lot of samples so I'm not the best to tell you how to do that, but the idea is the same. Build the skeleton first with the things I said earlier and then add the tendons, ligaments, veins, muscle, fat, etc. You do it in layers. Eventually, when you have enough layers, you'll have a person. If you don't know music theory like me, you can use charts that show the scales and keys and chords within them. Pick your scale and key, go in with a marker and mark which keys you're allowed to hit and press them in random combinations. You'll eventually press a combination you like. It's obviously not as simple as I'm making it seem, but I taught myself how to do this in less than a year and it works every single time for me. It's about finding what works for you. How someone else does it may not work for you. I'm telling you how I do it because that's what goes on in my head when I'm doing it. It may not work for you, but I found it helpful.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Here for the gear
 

this is definitely helpful, if i were to hear a song. how would one be able to discern what scale one was using. i have apps that tell me key and tempo but not the scale? anyways thanks for the tips
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Gear Nut
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRiLenT View Post
this is definitely helpful, if i were to hear a song. how would one be able to discern what scale one was using. i have apps that tell me key and tempo but not the scale? anyways thanks for the tips
There are many plugins that can do this but many do it by ear as well. I can't do it by ear so I use the plugins. I know that if it sounds "happy" it's usually in the major scale. Most pop songs are in C major which is all white keys. It's tricky because there are relative scales that are kind of "equal" to each other. Like a negative and positive number (-1,1). There is a relative major and relative minor. I've been able to make songs using two keys and scales as long as they were relative.

One way that I find does this for me pretty effectively is to put autotune on a track and crank it to 0 retune and sing through it while changing the keys and scales. Once it sounds good and like every note is what it should be, you're probably in the right key. You can tell very easily when autotune is in the wrong key because it goes all over the place.

Sorry for any typos, I don't proof read these things.
Post Reply

Welcome to the Gearslutz Pro Audio Community!

Registration benefits include:
  • The ability to reply to and create new discussions
  • Access to members-only giveaways & competitions
  • Interact with VIP industry experts in our guest Q&As
  • Access to members-only sub forum discussions
  • Access to members-only Chat Room
  • Get INSTANT ACCESS to the world's best private pro audio Classifieds for only USD $20/year
  • Promote your eBay auctions and Reverb.com listings for free
  • Remove this message!
You need an account to post a reply. Create a username and password below and an account will be created and your post entered.


 
 
Slide to join now Processing…
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump