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What If Hip Hop's Musical Foundation Began With Live Instrumentation?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #1
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boombapdame's Avatar
 

What If Hip Hop's Musical Foundation Began With Live Instrumentation?

Think about the fact that Hip Hop, since its genesis, was seen as not real music due to sampling as its musical foundation. I don't think sampling is inherently cheating (but using loops and throwing drums, etc. on top and/or distorting samples to the point of audio vomit is), but I do think that sampling has inherent limitations brought on by the fact that you have people who think nothing of lifting samples and not asking for permission, which is the basis for copyright lawsuits and creators saying "**** it, I'll take what I want" which used to be Hip Hop's pre corporate ethos. I'm to a point as a listener to instrumentals where I enjoy non sampled (e.g. from vinyl) Hip Hop as much as sampled Hip Hop.

It costs a lot depending on one's skill level to record some actual people playing actual instruments, but the quality of phone peripherals, standalone portable recorders, etc. has made recording possible, albeit w/issues such as latency, etc. and no tech is inherently perfect.

I know not everyone has the interest, time and or/money investment in learning an instrument (before throwing away money on a physical teacher although physical, in-person lessons in anything are best, getting started on YouTube, which is not a replacement for actual paid lessons on an instrument, via actual courses from actual colleges and/or universities w/music departments is a start if you know how to effectively search the Internet), but how many here would make Hip Hop if you were told that you couldn't sample, period?
Old 4 weeks ago
  #2
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BezowinZ's Avatar
I currently sample .05% of the time. Half of that are multi-samples.

Between virtual instruments, electric & acoustic guitars and bass, I'd be OK.

But I have been putting my MPC Live to better use, sampling a bit more.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #3
Good question. If we ignore the fact that Hip Hop evolved from DJ's spinning records with MC's adding a couple phrases here and there to hype the crowd that eventually turned into full verses, I'd suggest that it would be as if the old Disco Rap records were actually the genesis of Hip Hop where you had Funk grooves with rapping instead of singing - this actually could have happened if we look at Fatback Band's King Tim III for example and ignore the early pioneer DJ's. With the emergence of drum machine style Hip Hop such as early Run DMC with the emergence of affordable drum machines from Roland from there I guess it would just skip the James Brown and Jazz sampling of late 80's and 90's and end up with what we have now in that people use drum machine sounds and synths instead of samples for anything aimed at commercial release. Effectively, I think we'd be where we are today but earlier.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #4
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Tommycash's Avatar
 

There has always been live instrumentation. I can go back to Kurtis Blow, The Fat Boys (who were produced by Kurtis) Whodini and many others. But since Hip Hop started with an mc rapping over an instrumental that a dj played, it was just the a natural progression to start sampling.
Also the fact that they cut school funding for music in the public schools in nyc in the late 70s early 80s, that also factored into how turntables, drum machines and samplers became our instruments.
Old 1 week ago
  #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommycash View Post
There has always been live instrumentation. I can go back to Kurtis Blow, The Fat Boys (who were produced by Kurtis) Whodini and many others. But since Hip Hop started with an mc rapping over an instrumental that a dj played, it was just the a natural progression to start sampling.
Also the fact that they cut school funding for music in the public schools in nyc in the late 70s early 80s, that also factored into how turntables, drum machines and samplers became our instruments.
Many early HH records didn’t actually use samples. Everything on Sugar Hill Records was replayed by their house band (Pumpkinhead), including Sugar Hill Gang’s hits.

Much of Run-DMC’s production used live instrumentation.
Old 1 week ago
  #6
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Brent Hahn's Avatar
 

1970.

Old 1 week ago
  #7
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I really try not to sample, but I love it.
Not the regular auto chop type of sampling, or just using a 4 bar loop and pitching it, but taking different chords, progressions, or colors and mixing them together. Same with drums.
Maybe use a drum loop, but definitely layer or alter the sounds. Preferably slice a few loops and use a kick from here, a snare from there. Then layer that a bit.
Like, that feels like truly building and creating something to me.
Simply programming drum samples or using a drum loop, or pre made 4-8 bar sample doesn’t feel like I’m creating.
To some extent, that’s probably ego.
But it’s also just the human in me wanting to create something that’s truly unique, my own creation.
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Hahn View Post
1970.



1968
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Gear Addict
 

it did. LLS
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