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Pitfalls in music production Virtual Instrument Plugins
Old 18th January 2019
  #1
Gear Maniac
 

Pitfalls in music production

What do you guys think are some of the pitfalls in beatmaking, opposed to composing original music for a rap or r&b song?
Old 18th January 2019
  #2
Lives for gear
Generally speaking, the term "beatmaking" and "original music" are synonymous in all of my professional experience.

I will add this though, if this is what you were thinking.... I have worked with plenty of artists who absolutely will NOT consider a beat if it has a sample in it, or if it has ever been available for lease. These are more serious artists making that decision for business reasons regardless of how good the beat is.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #3
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boombapdame's Avatar
@chris carter I definitely won't consider a beat if it has samples period.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #4
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
@chris carter I definitely won't consider a beat if it has samples period.
I agree. One of the major downfalls to writing and producing.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #5
Gear Addict
 
BezowinZ's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagicorn35 View Post
What do you guys think are some of the pitfalls in beatmaking, opposed to composing original music for a rap or r&b song?
Though I don't sample aside from creating the ocassional multi-sampled instrument, I never thought of these as separate things, just different processes. But my process is probably why I never knew some folks never consider sample based tracks, not that any big names have been interested in my stuff. I get it though.
Old 4 weeks ago
  #6
Gear Head
 

Everyone is talking about people not wanting samples, but something should be said. Artists not wanting samples is mainly with regards to highly identifiable melodies.

The vast majority of modern hip hop and pop producers often pull from the same collection of sound-kits, ie, snares, kicks, 808s, hats, and so on. Some producers do make their own sounds, but it's uncommon. I often make my own 808 sounds depending on what I am going for. There are a significant amount of companies [re]selling drum kits and such online that they just compiled in their own effort. The fact of the matter is the origin of most "samples" like this cannot be conclusively proven, and it would be very hard for a producer to argue in court that someone is using a snare they created. Nobody in the industry cares about this.

Sampling full-blown melodies from songs is a different matter, and way easier to sue someone for, for obvious reasons. Most artists won't bother with such beats because it's far simpler to find high quality fully unique beats.

One of the biggest things that separates big producers from smaller ones is having knowledge of sound design. That is, how to recreate sounds from scratch with synthesizers by understanding how the settings come into play. It may seem daunting but it is definitely worth any serious producer to learn, and doesn't take that long. There's lots of good tutorials on the topic on youtube, and it is a insanely powerful skill in any producers arsenal.

Despite me having over a dozen famous VST plugins, with thousands upon thousands of instruments/presets at my disposal, I constantly find myself feeling limited and unable to find a preset that fits my desire for a given beat. Lately it has become far easier for me to build a sound from scratch in Serum than to hunt through thousands of presets, at least with synths.
Old 3 weeks ago
  #7
Gear Maniac
 

I guess I should have said, sampling for sounds, instead of sampling loops from published records. Yeah theirs many sound kits out, royalty free samples from different producers. But, I think what can make a producer original is creating his own sounds from scratch. Like myself. I love sampling. And I sample for sounds or notes. And then I’ll tweak sounds until you can’t tell where it come from, but still keep the integrity of it. And then compose with it. Sound design is important. Creating sounds from a waveform was never to interesting to me, until I tried it tho. But still love sampling for sounds. When it comes to sampling drum loops, imma sucker for that too.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #8
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XKAudio's Avatar
 

”beatmaker” used to kind of mean “underdeveloped” producer. I think that has changed and has become a job of its own.

Now a lot of beatmakers are making the original inspiration for a song, just as a songwriter would with chords and lyrics in the past.

Seams the definition of producer is actually going back to its original definition, and producers are using beatmakers, songwriters to currate a song for an artist.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #9
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BezowinZ's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by XKAudio View Post
...Now a lot of beatmakers are making the original inspiration for a song, just as a songwriter would with chords and lyrics in the past.

Seams the definition of producer is actually going back to its original definition, and producers are using beatmakers, songwriters to currate a song for an artist.
This has always been the case. It's only different when the beat maker / song writer / performer is ALSO the producer, which happens a lot in Hip Hop.

There are a lot of esoteric definitions for beat maker in this thread that I don't understand. A beat maker is a song writer and/or performer, no different than a member of a band, hired song writer or studio musician. He/she writes and/or performs/programs parts.

If anything is changing, it's the producer's role. With folks using sound packs, sampling off other Hip Hop records, who's really directing the sound? This is why a lot of those packs are royalty free for small releases only. The small print is often different for bigger releases, requiring producer credit to the provider.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #10
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BezowinZ View Post
This has always been the case. It's only different when the beat maker / song writer / performer is ALSO the producer, which happens a lot in Hip Hop.

There are a lot of esoteric definitions for beat maker in this thread that I don't understand. A beat maker is a song writer and/or performer, no different than a member of a band, hired song writer or studio musician. He/she writes and/or performs/programs parts.

If anything is changing, it's the producer's role. With folks using sound packs, sampling off other Hip Hop records, who's really directing the sound? This is why a lot of those packs are royalty free for small releases only. The small print is often different for bigger releases, requiring producer credit to the provider.
I think if anything. If you are a producer. You should have your own sound, no matter the genre. When hip hop started. It was drum driven. With probably small sampled stabs here and there. But it was always about the beat. And the lyrics. How I view a producers job, is to support the song that you’re helping to make. In r&b. I worked with a lot of singer/songwriters that brought me full completed songs. They just needed production. It was mostly a demo tape of a singer, singing the main melody and playing chords on a piano. The first thing I used to do was figure out what instruments are gonna play her chord progressions. As in what instruments are going to support her song. The lyrics and melodies. Usually it was all synth and drum machine driven and digitally recorded. When I started doing more rap songs. I noticed that the artist needed something first. They needed support. The backing instruments they play the chord progressions. Knowing this, I knew we didn’t have a melody either. Just instruments playing chords, bass and drums, and lyrics. So I start composing the melodies with the chords. And I guess I turned into the songwriter and producer and the rappers were the lyricist. Most rappers used to say. Play that one BEAT you let me here the other day and etc. I think I have a song for it. But! Back to the point. A producer is suppose to come with a sound. He should learn sound design, sample sounds and make them your own.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #11
Gear Head
 

Many beatmakers refer to themselves as producers, which I suppose a beat maker is a type of music producer, but in my opinion, I only consider someone a producer if they at least have the means to organize a complete song. That means, getting the beat together, helping the artist record, arranging the track so the beat compliments the vocals, and so on. For the most part, any major-level beat maker is going to be capable of doing this, but many new ones won't have much of the knowledge necessary.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #12
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metroid View Post
Many beatmakers refer to themselves as producers, which I suppose a beat maker is a type of music producer, but in my opinion, I only consider someone a producer if they at least have the means to organize a complete song. That means, getting the beat together, helping the artist record, arranging the track so the beat compliments the vocals, and so on. For the most part, any major-level beat maker is going to be capable of doing this, but many new ones won't have much of the knowledge necessary.
Yeah! You’re right. I think for the lack of classes on songwriting, production and engineering. May be why the confusion still exists. And young aspiring music producers would drop a beatmaker title real quick if they knew what it takes to be a producer or songwriter. Just in my opinion. A hip hop producer is only part of the writing team when he or she adds the main melody for the song, with a synth or some type of lead instrument. But more important to me is the sound they represent and know how, of working with a singer or a rapper or a musician who plays an instrument. It’s the producers job. In my opinion. Every songwriter should understand his or her job too. You write lyrics and vocal melodies. And should be good at it. Songwriting is barebone work. Production is finished product. If your not ready for the task. Then you’re still learning. Not a beatmaker lol.
Old 2 weeks ago
  #13
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atma's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagicorn35 View Post
Yeah! You’re right. I think for the lack of classes on songwriting, production and engineering.
People need to check out coursera.org and check out all the incredible online courses related to music production/engineering/songwriting/etc., (they're free, or cheap as hell—if you have little or no income, all you have to do is write a short essay on why you deserve financial aid and they will waive the course fees). There are even a bunch provided by Berklee, which is a world renown music school (which I HIGHLY recommend to everyone). You can ALWAYS learn more and delve deeper into whatever your musical interests are. Coursera even provides certificates for completion of several related courses, which can be posted on an online resume. IMO being great at anything music-related is all about having deep comprehension levels related to your specific field (as well as a refined personal aesthetic, which develops with time and experience).

peace.
Old 1 week ago
  #14
Gear Maniac
 

I'd say the biggest thing us nobody seeing the big picture or not agreeing with it.

Production can often become a tug of war where nobody is on the same page.

There is often a chain of command where someone might not listen to one person but listen to someone else.

I think not being team players and not clearly stating goals can be huge roadblocks. A term I often hear is one hand doesn't know what the other is doing.


Also trying to do too much with limited or no budget or improper use of budget.
Old 1 week ago
  #15
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boombapdame's Avatar
I need some budget examples @jlgrimes11
Old 1 week ago
  #16
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlgrimes11 View Post
I'd say the biggest thing us nobody seeing the big picture or not agreeing with it.

Production can often become a tug of war where nobody is on the same page.

There is often a chain of command where someone might not listen to one person but listen to someone else.

I think not being team players and not clearly stating goals can be huge roadblocks. A term I often hear is one hand doesn't know what the other is doing.


Also trying to do too much with limited or no budget or improper use of budget.
Yeah! This a major pitfall. I’ve witness these situations before. I hired a bass player once. And his job was to come in and replace a virtual guitar bass I had. Or than him doing what was asked. Of course he decided to give his input on the overall production and had strong feelings about what should be where and etc. For me. Major pitfall. He caused my session to move slower and for that happening, I told him I couldn’t work with him anymore. My pitfall situation.
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