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Best Set Up For Rap Vocals Gobo & Screen Panels
Old 1 week ago
  #1
Here for the gear
 

Best Set Up For Rap Vocals

Hello everyone,

It's been a while since I've been into the recording world (I haven't bought anything in 8 years).

I want to set up a little studio for rap vocals. I am a music manager, and my rapper needs to have the closest thing to professional, clean sounding vocals. Without going over board with price, but with also wanting quality sound what would you guys suggest?

From my research I thought we could get away with just an Appogge Duet and a Nueman TLM 103 mic. Would this be enough to get the job done? And just use the pre-amp from the duet?

OR would I need additional equipment, such as an additional pre-amp, or a compressor?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
Old 1 week ago
  #2
Make sure you acoustically treat the room before worrying about anything else.
Old 1 week ago
  #3
Gear Head
 

Duet and TLM103 are not a bad combination. But if you’re worried about professional sound, why not just spend the $1000 on studio time? If your talent is well rehearsed, that should be enough to record at least a few tracks.
Old 1 week ago
  #4
Lives for gear
 
3rd Degree's Avatar
 

The room is more important than anything to me. I have recorded on worse than that and had stellar results, and I attribute it to the room I built and really putting in the work to get it right. I now have an untreated spot, I wouldn't even call it a room, it's in part of a large room and it brings out the worst in my LDC.

However, I would say the sort of generic setup that many records have been done on is a U87/U87ai, Avalon 373, and pretty much any converters that stack up to a Digidesign 192. Now, that is not the best bang for the buck, especially new, but it's just a setup that have been used over and over on rap vocals. I always think it is best to cater the mic more specifically when it is only for one person, and a cheaper mic may be better, and certainly good records are made with both a TLM 102 or 103, not that they are that similar, but other mics can be better, but it's hard to know what to recommend when I don't know what has worked well, worked OK, and just sounded bad. GAP, Warm Audio, and a few others offer preamps that give a bit of color which I recommend but not necessary. Then the Apogee is good.

Plenty of ways to go, I just like to use that as kind of a baseline of what you can make a great record on, even though not all would consider them great pieces now, it works.

I do agree with above though, I was doing some work out of my personal studio (mostly created for making beats) but I typically do serious projects in a purpose built studio (not that mine was far off that).
Old 1 week ago
  #5
Here for the gear
 

Thanks for the replies so far guys.

We do plan to either build a booth, or use a reflection filter in a room with no noise and good acoustics. Assuming we have a booth, or an area where this isn't any negative sound coming in, could I get away with the Appoggee and a TLM or do I need to get something else like the avalon?
Old 1 week ago
  #6
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by gym69 View Post
Thanks for the replies so far guys.

We do plan to either build a booth, or use a reflection filter in a room with no noise and good acoustics. Assuming we have a booth, or an area where this isn't any negative sound coming in, could I get away with the Appoggee and a TLM or do I need to get something else like the avalon?
Do not build a booth unless you REQUIRE isolation between the vocalist and the control room. If the engineer will wear headphones then you are better off with a one room setup. If the computer is too noisy, then build an iso box for it or put it in a closet.

Reflection filters are good for situations where there is no other choice. You are significantly better off putting heavy blankets behind the vocalist while they sing/rap into a cardioid mic. It will be more effective at reducing room reflections by an order of magnitude and will introduce zero coloration (and you'll preserve sight lines too if that is important). That's the pro way to do it. See this video for where to put blankets (does not need to be this fancy looking, just hang heavy duvets).
Old 1 week ago
  #7
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
Do not build a booth unless you REQUIRE isolation between the vocalist and the control room. If the engineer will wear headphones then you are better off with a one room setup. If the computer is too noisy, then build an iso box for it or put it in a closet.

Reflection filters are good for situations where there is no other choice. You are significantly better off putting heavy blankets behind the vocalist while they sing/rap into a cardioid mic. It will be more effective at reducing room reflections by an order of magnitude and will introduce zero coloration (and you'll preserve sight lines too if that is important). That's the pro way to do it. See this video for where to put blankets (does not need to be this fancy looking, just hang heavy duvets).
Wow, thanks a lot, very helpful.

And as far as the set up, the duet, plus the TLM will it be good enough to do the trick? With creating clean vocals? Assuming the acoustics are good?
Old 1 week ago
  #8
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Led Music's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by gym69 View Post
could I get away with the Appoggee and a TLM or do I need to get something else like the avalon?
You’d do fine with that combo. Great advice from others about room acoustics that’s super important. Don’t forget a decent pop filter, Rappers get wild.
Get your gain staging right and don’t record too hot.
If you feel in the future you want to add something more, grab a new preamp and then a compressor or channel strip but theres absolutely no reason you can’t get great sounds from the apogee and Neumann combo assuming you’ve taken care of mic placement , acoustics and gain staging.
All the best! Enjoy the forum.
Old 1 week ago
  #9
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Led Music View Post
You’d do fine with that combo. Great advice from others about room acoustics that’s super important. Don’t forget a decent pop filter, Rappers get wild.
Get your gain staging right and don’t record too hot.
If you feel in the future you want to add something more, grab a new preamp and then a compressor or channel strip but theres absolutely no reason you can’t get great sounds from the apogee and Neumann combo assuming you’ve taken care of mic placement , acoustics and gain staging.
All the best! Enjoy the forum.
Thanks!
Old 1 week ago
  #10
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by gym69 View Post
Wow, thanks a lot, very helpful.

And as far as the set up, the duet, plus the TLM will it be good enough to do the trick? With creating clean vocals? Assuming the acoustics are good?
The Duet and TLM will be fine. Honestly, it's mostly the performance, then the acoustics and engineering, and then the mic, and then the preamp, and then the converter, in that order.

Provided you have a good engineer with experience and knows what they are doing, and you hang plenty of blankets you'll be fine. Amateur stuff like a crappy sounding space, recording too hot (don't get ANYWHERE near 0dBFS!!!!, peaks of -6 are plenty good enough), bad mic position, bad gain-staging, not using a pop filter, etc. that's the stuff that sinks an otherwise good performance. Of all the records I've mixed it's rare that I complain about the mic choice. It's almost always one of the other human errors that I grumble about while mixing.
Old 1 week ago
  #11
Here for the gear
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
The Duet and TLM will be fine. Honestly, it's mostly the performance, then the acoustics and engineering, and then the mic, and then the preamp, and then the converter, in that order.

Provided you have a good engineer with experience and knows what they are doing, and you hang plenty of blankets you'll be fine. Amateur stuff like a crappy sounding space, recording too hot (don't get ANYWHERE near 0dBFS!!!!, peaks of -6 are plenty good enough), bad mic position, bad gain-staging, not using a pop filter, etc. that's the stuff that sinks an otherwise good performance. Of all the records I've mixed it's rare that I complain about the mic choice. It's almost always one of the other human errors that I grumble about while mixing.

Thank you
Old 4 days ago
  #12
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atma's Avatar
 

You might consider something like the GIK portable isolation booth (or simply build one yourself if you have the tools/material). I have likely the absolute worst acoustics of any house I've ever been in (it's like one reaaallly long town-house), so I use a combination of the portable isolation booth behind me, and then I have blankets in front of me, pop filter, etc. In my space, it took a LOT of time and experimentation to find the exact positioning and set up to be able to get rid of the sound of the acoustics in here.

But yeah, I think the sound of the acoustics in any space is the single most important factor in achieving a professional sound.
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