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how many uses breaks?
Old 5th April 2007
  #1
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fn86's Avatar
 

how many uses breaks?

when doing beats the thing that kills my creativity the most is finding oneshots that match! i dont have like a thousand snares and kicks, i have like 50-60 kicks and the same amount of snares and hihats.

so i am looking for some pointers on how to easier make oneshots glue and fit together!!! how do you usually go about this process´?

and now to the question at hand: do the most producers use chopped up and processed breaks instead of oneshots? i mean that would certainly kill the process of finding matching drumsounds?

please gimme some light on this topic.
Old 5th April 2007
  #2
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yeah just chop up breaks.
you can still layer and sh*t if you like but you'd start with some cohesive stuff when using breaks.
Old 5th April 2007
  #3
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EspionageWHW's Avatar
 

I'll use breaks sometimes, but I love working with one shots. Having an extensive collection of drum sounds definitely helps. Tuning your drums can sometimes be the key. I'll usually find a snare that sounds nice over my samples and then try to find a kick that works well with that snare... sometimes all you've got to do is tune the kick up or down a few cents and your good.
Old 5th April 2007
  #4
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Sirocco's Avatar
 

use a very light reverb to emulate sort of like how a room mic would pull together an acoustic drum kit
Old 5th April 2007
  #5
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Sometimes its good to group chopped break groups into one shots so they blend well. as opposed to grouping just kicks, snares, etc. group kits.
Old 5th April 2007
  #6
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thanks for the reverb-tip! =) when saying light do you mean just a touch of reverb, or do you mean a hp-filtered bright reverb?


A-List:
when you talk about grouping are you talking about sending the parts to a buss or what do you mean
Old 5th April 2007
  #7
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Beastie's Avatar
 

SOUND DESIGN!

Sound design them to match!

use kontakt!

HINT! - use breaks fro ghost grooves!

:D
Old 7th April 2007
  #8
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I don't usually just stick to a single type of drums - breaks or one shots, because it just hell of a limiting issue. An argument against using just breaks is that your drums will surely sound too familiar to anybody listening to enough music. An argument against using just one shots - well, most of them sound too plain.

Well, it depends on what you want to achieve - the oldschool 88 sound, 90's sound, modern club sound, or modern underground sound.

What i'd propose is layer and EQ the hell of em.

Peace.
Old 21st August 2007
  #9
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i think this thread should be re-alived, i think breaks is a very important element to beatmaking
Old 21st August 2007
  #10
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i listen for texture, first. If the texture's fit together, then once the drums are tuned, the kit will sound good... When your running through the stock kits, and you hit a kik and then a snare, most times when it catches your ear as something to run with, its because of the note relationship between the kik and the snare. Tuned properly, you can get almost any kik/snare combo to work... as you add additional elements like shaker/toms/congas/ you need to ALWAYS be aware of what notes your hitting... Thats how the neptunes were able to make such SICK trax with hardly anything going on... cuz the few elements they DID have were PERFECT for eachother, often spelling out a melody within the percussion track itself.

Theres a track on my myspace called "im thrown' where i actually tuned the 'blips' running throughout the track... they BARELY have a tone to them, but once i locked into the notes i needed it just GLUED in there so perfectly...

hope that helps a bit
Old 21st August 2007
  #11
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when you mean texture, are you talking about harmonic timbre?
Old 21st August 2007
  #12
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no i just mean, like matching the KIND ----like if i have a really tight kik, i may look for a really tight crunchy clap... i'm not gonna want a stadium stomp as my kik and a side stick for my snare....but once you find a kik/sn combo that is along the same lines, THEN you assess the tuning
Old 21st August 2007
  #13
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aah ok, i got you
Old 21st August 2007
  #14
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i was talking about organizing chopped breaks into kits

and playing a pattern with one shots from the same drum break
Old 21st August 2007
  #15
Eric,
Did you use a reverb or delay on your kick for that song "I'm thrown?" My kicks sound way too dry. Maybe you layered it W/ a slight delay?
Old 21st August 2007
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-List View Post
Sometimes its good to group chopped break groups into one shots so they blend well. as opposed to grouping just kicks, snares, etc. group kits.
yep..i have libraries chopped this way and it's real easy to make a new drum part that glues together when its like this.
Old 21st August 2007
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Sr. View Post
Eric,
Did you use a reverb or delay on your kick for that song "I'm thrown?" My kicks sound way too dry. Maybe you layered it W/ a slight delay?
no its just a long 808 with a harder, rounder kik at the front of it. i think once the kik is compressed and eq'd right (assuming the sound choice was tasteful) any kik should sound gell'd into your track.. maybe your kiks are too loud possibly??
Old 21st August 2007
  #18
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fn86's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by A-List View Post
Sometimes its good to group chopped break groups into one shots so they blend well. as opposed to grouping just kicks, snares, etc. group kits.
what do you mean? choping up the break and then sending all the oneshots to a drum buss to get it together or did i totally misunderstand you?
Old 21st August 2007
  #19
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no drum busses involved at this stage in the writing process

1.take drum break A on a record
2. chop into pieces and place on pads 1-8
3. play a pattern make a song

4.take drum break B from a record
5.chop and assgn to 9-16
6. play a pattern make a song

get a melody. add drums from break A. hmm sounds like ****. replay the pattern with drums from break B. sounds good. repeat etc. there is no set way to do this. organize by kits. i do it like this less than half the time. lately i just know what will probably sound good together. also i been using more library samples layered with chopped one shots from breaks. cause im getting more immediate satisfaction with sounds that some engineer/sound designer spent hours tweaking while i can work on more fun stuff like arrangement. dont take it from me though, ive got no charting music and no fat checks.ha
i realized it was when i started using the word "group" that it got confusing.
Old 21st August 2007
  #20
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my name is Azwun and i'm a drum break addict
Old 21st August 2007
  #21
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by filterayok View Post
i listen for texture, first. If the texture's fit together, then once the drums are tuned, the kit will sound good... When your running through the stock kits, and you hit a kik and then a snare, most times when it catches your ear as something to run with, its because of the note relationship between the kik and the snare. Tuned properly, you can get almost any kik/snare combo to work... as you add additional elements like shaker/toms/congas/ you need to ALWAYS be aware of what notes your hitting... Thats how the neptunes were able to make such SICK trax with hardly anything going on... cuz the few elements they DID have were PERFECT for eachother, often spelling out a melody within the percussion track itself.

Theres a track on my myspace called "im thrown' where i actually tuned the 'blips' running throughout the track... they BARELY have a tone to them, but once i locked into the notes i needed it just GLUED in there so perfectly...

hope that helps a bit
Good insight..
What is your choice on software for tuning percussive elements or editing them?
Old 21st August 2007
  #22
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I sample and chop in my MPC60. It does a great job of "gluing" different drum samples together to make a coherent kit. The 60 imparts it's own flavor to a sample... specially if you hit it's input hard when sampling!

The reverb trick is a good one. So is tuning...

Also send all your samples to one stereo bus and compress and EQ. ITB I use Vintage Warmer. OTB I use a TLA FAT Man or a Joe Meek Twin Q.

Another trick is to put a warm distortion pedal on a send and feed a little of every sample to it. Bring a little bit of the pedal back into the mix... Gives all the drums a nice bit of color to glue them together.

Hugo
Old 21st August 2007
  #23
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have or make a sampler patch that only has kick drums. one shot kicks, from break etc.

then another patch in another sampler (or same but difrent chanel) of only snares.

another for hats.

have them in song templates so if u start making your beat from a sample drum or whatever u always con go to the track full of kicks and audition 61 kick in seconds instead of looking in a library folder, or audio window.

and its fast to layer them to make them fatter.

if u are using breaks from loops, u chop them so the kick is in one channel, the snare in the other so u can process them difrently.
Old 22nd August 2007
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtafich View Post
Good insight..
What is your choice on software for tuning percussive elements or editing them?
i use a pitchwheel to tune em, and protools to edit them...........

Or stylus RMX
Old 22nd August 2007
  #25
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PettyCash's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by huggie View Post
I sample and chop in my MPC60. It does a great job of "gluing" different drum samples together to make a coherent kit. The 60 imparts it's own flavor to a sample... specially if you hit it's input hard when sampling!

The reverb trick is a good one. So is tuning...

Also send all your samples to one stereo bus and compress and EQ. ITB I use Vintage Warmer. OTB I use a TLA FAT Man or a Joe Meek Twin Q.

Another trick is to put a warm distortion pedal on a send and feed a little of every sample to it. Bring a little bit of the pedal back into the mix... Gives all the drums a nice bit of color to glue them together.

Hugo
....... thumbsup
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