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New Rappers of the Future & their Mix Quality
Old 5th February 2017
  #1
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New Rappers of the Future & their Mix Quality

I was listening to some supposedly new Rappers (well...new to me because I never heard of them before). Regardless, the Mixing on the songs didn't sound right and allegedly a credible rapper well known (Not going to mention names..) is borrow their flow style.

But the mix of the song they had was terrible and distorted IMO.

Its as though they just turned up the compressor knobs and ran with it.

Is it me or this is what the majority of the new comes to the industry are doing now a days because most of the music is heard online?

I must be getting old if this has become the industry standard of mixing now a days?

BTW.. this rapper has over 6 Million views so... does the younger generation care about quality?

Last edited by ANR2011; 5th February 2017 at 10:13 PM.. Reason: Wording
Old 5th February 2017
  #2
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I feel the same. Being in the Bay Area, I really feel the majority of albums are basically "passable", meaning the mix isn't so bad it actually makes me not able to listen to the music, but it's far from what I consider to be "polished". In the Bay, a lot of times it simply a budget issue, almost every rapper out here is independent and the mix quality is sort of equivalent to how much the person is actually selling. The best selling artists have good mixes, the good selling ones have lesser, and the average professional rapper has average mixes.

I honestly don't think it is so much of a generational thing, but more of just how music is made, and what people are making. It's not just that albums don't sell like they used to, thus investing in the best person may not make financial sense, a lot of current rappers, be new or people who have been around, but kept a following, are putting out 4-10x as much material as a similar artist would a decade ago. So you have smaller budgets yearly, but at the same time, you have to do an expensive process way more often.

A lot of people will just say that it's because everyone is using low end headphones, everything is downgraded through streaming or MP3, or they are young, I personally just think it's totally budget oriented.

I know plenty of people who want to spend around $1500-2000 an album, and I know plenty of engineers who are really good, and IMO, affordable, but charge (and reasonably so), half to all of that, for a single song. So, the money just isn't there.

Even the fact you bring up YouTube, I know more than a few artists who put video shoots as a top budget priority, and may spend more on a video than mixing. So that all trickles down because it is more important to be visible than to have great sounding music and not be.
Old 6th February 2017
  #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3rd Degree View Post
I feel the same. Being in the Bay Area, I really feel the majority of albums are basically "passable", meaning the mix isn't so bad it actually makes me not able to listen to the music, but it's far from what I consider to be "polished". In the Bay, a lot of times it simply a budget issue, almost every rapper out here is independent and the mix quality is sort of equivalent to how much the person is actually selling. The best selling artists have good mixes, the good selling ones have lesser, and the average professional rapper has average mixes.

I honestly don't think it is so much of a generational thing, but more of just how music is made, and what people are making. It's not just that albums don't sell like they used to, thus investing in the best person may not make financial sense, a lot of current rappers, be new or people who have been around, but kept a following, are putting out 4-10x as much material as a similar artist would a decade ago. So you have smaller budgets yearly, but at the same time, you have to do an expensive process way more often.

A lot of people will just say that it's because everyone is using low end headphones, everything is downgraded through streaming or MP3, or they are young, I personally just think it's totally budget oriented.

I know plenty of people who want to spend around $1500-2000 an album, and I know plenty of engineers who are really good, and IMO, affordable, but charge (and reasonably so), half to all of that, for a single song. So, the money just isn't there.

Even the fact you bring up YouTube, I know more than a few artists who put video shoots as a top budget priority, and may spend more on a video than mixing. So that all trickles down because it is more important to be visible than to have great sounding music and not be.
But the thing is ...how will the mixes standout in the year 2030 and beyond?

There are some Hip hop songs from the 1980's (random songs) like the Examples below that stand the test of time. Even though some is on vinyl the mix quality is still there.




Now the 2016 & now a days..



Maybe is mixed right off of another online streaming player source... but IMO this doesn't sound right at all.!
Old 6th February 2017
  #4
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Ken Lewis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
I was listening to some supposedly new Rappers (well...new to me because I never heard of them before). Regardless, the Mixing on the songs didn't sound right and allegedly a credible rapper well known (Not going to mention names..) is borrow their flow style.

But the mix of the song they had was terrible and distorted IMO.

Its as though they just turned up the compressor knobs and ran with it.

Is it me or this is what the majority of the new comes to the industry are doing now a days because most of the music is heard online?

I must be getting old if this has become the industry standard of mixing now a days?

BTW.. this rapper has over 6 Million views so... does the younger generation care about quality?
album budgets mostly have been greatly reduced compared to what they used to be. So, part of the problem is that they can't afford cream of the crop mixers / engineers / etc... and part of the problem is people are too accepting of mediocrity on both the artist and listener side.
Old 6th February 2017
  #5
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Originally Posted by Ken Lewis View Post
album budgets mostly have been greatly reduced compared to what they used to be. So, part of the problem is that they can't afford cream of the crop mixers / engineers / etc... and part of the problem is people are too accepting of mediocrity on both the artist and listener side.
Well from the looks of it ...things seem to be revolting back to when most starting Mixing and not understanding it and now this has become the majority therefore they've are slowly taking over.

I was shocked to see that these rappers are achieving crazy view numbers on their Youtube songs with such terrible mixes.

The question now should be is this the end of quality? Has the quantity coming out now a days destroyed that? What happens to all the higher end Recording studios that use to charge $80/Hr plus? (Some charged even as high as $150/Hr..)

If kids are accepting and liking a subpar lyrical song with mediocre Beat production and a terrible Mix/Master... Are those of us who are still aiming for success with well polished song production and excellent mixes wasting our time?

There is an old saying that tell people 'The Majority Always Wins'...so taking this into consideration ..what does the future hold?
Old 6th February 2017
  #6
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This guy xxxtentacion you're referring too I'm pretty sure that distorted sound is what he's going for.

If you listen to his other tracks you can tell that it's done on purpose.

He has a soundcloud account with a lot more songs. You can search for it if you're really interested in how his other songs are mixed.

I don't think it says anything about the future of rappers and their mix quality.
Old 6th February 2017
  #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Vigilanti View Post
This guy xxxtentacion you're referring too I'm pretty sure that distorted sound is what he's going for.

If you listen to his other tracks you can tell that it's done on purpose.

He has a soundcloud account with a lot more songs. You can search for it if you're really interested in how his other songs are mixed.

I don't think it says anything about the future of rappers and their mix quality.
Possibly.. I was listening to other songs but a few sounded worse so I was thinking that it's possibly intentional. He isn't the only rapper I heard lately with terrible sound quality mixes and if we go back even a decade ago it wouldn't be expected.
Old 6th February 2017
  #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
Possibly.. I was listening to other songs but a few sounded worse so I was thinking that it's possibly intentional. He isn't the only rapper I heard lately with terrible sound quality mixes and if we go back even a decade ago it wouldn't be expected.
If this dude xxxtentacion beats his charges and grow his fan base beyond a cult following we'll probably be hearing a lot more rappers and artists with intentionally distorted mixes.

Overall though I think it's just the fact anyone with a few hundred dollars can record a record in their bedroom. Sometimes someone just messing around will get lucky.
Old 6th February 2017
  #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Vigilanti View Post
If this dude xxxtentacion beats his charges and grow his fan base beyond a cult following we'll probably be hearing a lot more rappers and artists with intentionally distorted mixes.

Overall though I think it's just the fact anyone with a few hundred dollars can record a record in their bedroom. Sometimes someone just messing around will get lucky.
I was thinking the same think but that takes us back to the point of quality. Distorting a mix intentionally doesn't take a PRO Engineer to make it happen. Most studio Engineer's and wannabe Producer's create that sound when they start off. This of course might affect major studios businesses because of their overhead costs.

You made a good point regarding that it's possibly intentional just as I believe his song structure arrangement and vocal sense targets the younger demographics with nonsense meaningless lyrical quality similar to some mumble rap songs. I'm just thinking that music as a whole on the commercial level with a infux of non talented individuals might be the contrary towards what will be considered the new talent in the future.

I get younger Rappers like this daily in their teens emailing asking for Free beats or what some called 'Beats for Non Profit' nonsense.. following the latest trends in a Tsunami of nonsense and wanted distorted mixes etc.

I ask these guys are they looking for the moment or songs that stand the test of time?
Old 6th February 2017
  #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
If kids are accepting and liking a subpar lyrical song with mediocre Beat production and a terrible Mix/Master... Are those of us who are still aiming for success with well polished song production and excellent mixes wasting our time?
if you are seriously asking that question you are in the wrong business. If you do anything except your best work always, you are part of the problem
Old 6th February 2017
  #11
Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
I was listening to some supposedly new Rappers (well...new to me because I never heard of them before). Regardless, the Mixing on the songs didn't sound right and allegedly a credible rapper well known (Not going to mention names..) is borrow their flow style.

But the mix of the song they had was terrible and distorted IMO.

Its as though they just turned up the compressor knobs and ran with it.

Is it me or this is what the majority of the new comes to the industry are doing now a days because most of the music is heard online?

I must be getting old if this has become the industry standard of mixing now a days?

BTW.. this rapper has over 6 Million views so... does the younger generation care about quality?
i think overall sound quality has increased. i have original Cd's from 96 like tupac all eyez on me and BG choppa city in the ghetto. Listening to the original albums I bought back then, those sound no better sound quality wise than the music of today. Different, but not better. Overall in general, for rap, vocals are clearer now and beats hit harder. Better eq and more compression, its a good thing for hip hop imo. One thing thats a lot better is the amount of sub bass in songs now. Back then they used bass on songs but not to the extent of the way bass sounds on trap music now. But I'm talking about music from signed artists. This kid looks unsigned or just barely getting recognized. Probably was doing no different than the other million aspiring rappers recording their own music.
Old 6th February 2017
  #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
I was listening to some supposedly new Rappers (well...new to me because I never heard of them before). Regardless, the Mixing on the songs didn't sound right and allegedly a credible rapper well known (Not going to mention names..) is borrow their flow style.

But the mix of the song they had was terrible and distorted IMO.

Its as though they just turned up the compressor knobs and ran with it.

Is it me or this is what the majority of the new comes to the industry are doing now a days because most of the music is heard online?

I must be getting old if this has become the industry standard of mixing now a days?

BTW.. this rapper has over 6 Million views so... does the younger generation care about quality?
You're interested in audio. You care about it. The average consumer doesn't. They don't care if the low end isn't tight or the bell-synth-sound has peaking resonances or the rap vocals got soaked in reverb, as long as the rapper provides a "listenable song".

Everybody can get a DAW, free or stock plugins and create something acceptable for the "consumer crowd" nowadays. They don’t have to invest time, money and networking to build up a studio and get “experts” together.

Take MetroBoomin as an example.

When you listen to the beats he made for 21 Savage and the beats he made for Weeknd's latest album, you can hear significant quality differences. Same producer but different engineers in the post-processing. High Quality still needs its "experts”.

I don't want to say that money makes the difference, but you just can't deny that some "pros" are sounding more "pro" than others, which is often connected to a bigger budget and team of producers, engineers.
But there are always exceptions. Take Kendrick Lamar’s latest album, and Dr. Dre’s latest album. Kendrick’s album sounds pristine and beautifully mixed, whil Dr. Dre’s album sound like crap. Both have the budget to deliver pristine quality.
Old 6th February 2017
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S1GNL View Post
You're interested in audio. You care about it. The average consumer doesn't. They don't care if the low end isn't tight or the bell-synth-sound has peaking resonances or the rap vocals got soaked in reverb, as long as the rapper provides a "listenable song".

Everybody can get a DAW, free or stock plugins and create something acceptable for the "consumer crowd" nowadays. They don’t have to invest time, money and networking to build up a studio and get “experts” together.

Take MetroBoomin as an example.

When you listen to the beats he made for 21 Savage and the beats he made for Weeknd's latest album, you can hear significant quality differences. Same producer but different engineers in the post-processing. High Quality still needs its "experts”.

I don't want to say that money makes the difference, but you just can't deny that some "pros" are sounding more "pro" than others, which is often connected to a bigger budget and team of producers, engineers.
But there are always exceptions. Take Kendrick Lamar’s latest album, and Dr. Dre’s latest album. Kendrick’s album sounds pristine and beautifully mixed, whil Dr. Dre’s album sound like crap. Both have the budget to deliver pristine quality.
One of the best answers so far without a defensiveness around the question of not knowing how to answer the question. A lot of these kids care less as a majority in a time where the industry all together has dipped down in a financial state. Most just don't care so the reflection of their mentality has shown through the music it self whiles some might want to ignore this...it's occurring.

Most say that music is a reflection of our society within the times that it occurs in so that truth remains as it is.
Old 6th February 2017
  #14
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@ ANR2011 how does one aim for songs that stand the test of time in an era of acceptable mediocrity?
Old 6th February 2017
  #15
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Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
@ ANR2011 how does one aim for songs that stand the test of time in an era of acceptable mediocrity?
IMO I would say 'Persistence' regardless of their environment that consist of adversity. Quality is usually recognized over quantity in most cases but it sometimes takes time for the majority to realize this.
Old 6th February 2017
  #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
One of the best answers so far without a defensiveness around the question of not knowing how to answer the question. A lot of these kids care less as a majority in a time where the industry all together has dipped down in a financial state. Most just don't care so the reflection of their mentality has shown through the music it self whiles some might want to ignore this...it's occurring.

Most say that music is a reflection of our society within the times that it occurs in so that truth remains as it is.
Yep. What anyone cares about will depend on their generation and what quality of music/playback systems they grew up with. The blanket statement "average listener" doesn't fly IMO. I know a lot of average listeners, and each and every one of them has an appreciation for good sounding mixes. The kids coming up right now on the other hand, listening to music on their smartphone speaker out loud to annoy people in public, or their laptop speakers, cheap bluetooth speakers, Beats/Apple headphones and earbuds, etc., are the exception to that if anything. The teens coming up right now are the ones people would have to worry about, if worrying about that stuff is your thing.
Old 6th February 2017
  #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
@ ANR2011 how does one aim for songs that stand the test of time in an era of acceptable mediocrity?
By making the best music that you possibly can, then calling it a day.

If people are still bumping your tunes 10, 20 years from now like it's something fresh, then you know you've succeeded. If the younger generation coming up make it their business to learn all about you, your music, and your career 10, 20 years from now, then you know you've succeeded....
Old 6th February 2017
  #18
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If we are talking hip hop only, i think its because the new generation of music makers follow what they heard. No innovation or originality comes by anymore. Its why you see all these posts how do i get a kick like so and so, or how do i make my vocals sound like so and so? Stop trying to sound like them and sound like you. Or hip hop cats now all want something for free. I understand not everyone has budgets to buy the best mic, drum machine, preamp, compressor available, but if you are half way serious about your craft, spend a little money where it counts. Dont make enough to get a good mic? Get another job and save until you do. When music sounds good you tend to listen a little closer, or maybe listen to something that you werent into before. Steely Dan for instance, not my type of music but damn that **** sounds good and i listen and marvel at the engineering those albums have.
Old 7th February 2017
  #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deuc647 View Post
When music sounds good you tend to listen a little closer, or maybe listen to something that you werent into before. Steely Dan for instance, not my type of music but damn that **** sounds good and i listen and marvel at the engineering those albums have.
That has always been one of my favorite parts of listening to music in general. Just playing a song and paying attention to all the nice "ear candy" in each mix, and even picking out parts of the mix or song production that I didn't like so much and imagining how I would do it differently if I had the chance (before I even knew anything about professional production/mixing). I had a sense of things before I actually had experience with anything technical behind it all. Because of that, I gravitated towards liking all sorts of music. Regardless of the genre, great music that is mixed well (well as in creatively awesome) is something I'll probably end up vibing to every time.

I think that's missing with a lot of people nowadays. With some people, all they consume is Hip Hop, and they know very little musically outside of that... so all their ideas don't go much further beyond the type of Hip Hop they're use to consuming. It's hard to program that "internal compass" of yours if you aren't consuming tons of music, and a different variety of it too. A lack of versatility in a producer/mixing engineer and artists too can lead to a lack of innovation in their work. If dudes are crushing their mixes into distortion and the artists are accepting it, their fanbase will most likely put up with it, then the masses also creating a similar type of music will follow suit, rather than seek out their own sense of sonic perfection, and trying to use that sound to go to battle with good ole "demoitis".
Old 7th February 2017
  #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PettyCash View Post
That has always been one of my favorite parts of listening to music in general. Just playing a song and paying attention to all the nice "ear candy" in each mix, and even picking out parts of the mix or song production that I didn't like so much and imagining how I would do it differently if I had the chance (before I even knew anything about professional production/mixing). I had a sense of things before I actually had experience with anything technical behind it all. Because of that, I gravitated towards liking all sorts of music. Regardless of the genre, great music that is mixed well (well as in creatively awesome) is something I'll probably end up vibing to every time.

I think that's missing with a lot of people nowadays. With some people, all they consume is Hip Hop, and they know very little musically outside of that... so all their ideas don't go much further beyond the type of Hip Hop they're use to consuming. It's hard to program that "internal compass" of yours if you aren't consuming tons of music, and a different variety of it too. A lack of versatility in a producer/mixing engineer and artists too can lead to a lack of innovation in their work. If dudes are crushing their mixes into distortion and the artists are accepting it, their fanbase will most likely put up with it, then the masses also creating a similar type of music will follow suit, rather than seek out their own sense of sonic perfection, and trying to use that sound to go to battle with good ole "demoitis".
Agreed, one thing i have on repeat right now is "Something about April II" instrumental album. Shyt is full blown eargasm type music, even though he mixes on tape and i sometimes get a little annoyed with the hiss.
Old 7th February 2017
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deuc647 View Post
If we are talking hip hop only, i think its because the new generation of music makers follow what they heard. No innovation or originality comes by anymore. Its why you see all these posts how do i get a kick like so and so, or how do i make my vocals sound like so and so? Stop trying to sound like them and sound like you. Or hip hop cats now all want something for free. I understand not everyone has budgets to buy the best mic, drum machine, preamp, compressor available, but if you are half way serious about your craft, spend a little money where it counts. Dont make enough to get a good mic? Get another job and save until you do. When music sounds good you tend to listen a little closer, or maybe listen to something that you werent into before. Steely Dan for instance, not my type of music but damn that **** sounds good and i listen and marvel at the engineering those albums have.
Yes...! I can't agree anymore! This kids always want something for nothing it's becoming unbearable. I just had an argument last night with a young artist about this when she mentioned that she wants to make it in music but hasn't money and helps take care of her family. I told her if she is serious she will establish some kinda of on pursuing her craft. Now a days the majority of these kids in music don't want you to give them good advice nor do they appreciate it.
Old 7th February 2017
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
Yes...! I can't agree anymore! This kids always want something for nothing it's becoming unbearable. I just had an argument last night with a young artist about this when she mentioned that she wants to make it in music but hasn't money and helps take care of her family. I told her if she is serious she will establish some kinda of on pursuing her craft. Now a days the majority of these kids in music don't want you to give them good advice nor do they appreciate it.
I just can't agree with this idea that it's some "youth" thing. I see the exact same thing happen with pretty much every artist who doesn't have the luxury of a big budget. Those are people I know personally, and people I have yet to meet, just a fan, but saw their quality fall quite a bit once they either had to go independent, or are on very fan base specific label. It just is what it is.

I really want to go deeper than that, because there are various things that make a lot of sense but even doing the math on a big name artist who didn't sell as well as had hoped, or an older artist who hit a higher point than expected, when you actually pay attention to sales, not numbers, it's kind of expected, IMO, that compromises were made. It's not just mixing, it's usually across the board.
Old 7th February 2017
  #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3rd Degree View Post
I just can't agree with this idea that it's some "youth" thing. I see the exact same thing happen with pretty much every artist who doesn't have the luxury of a big budget. Those are people I know personally, and people I have yet to meet, just a fan, but saw their quality fall quite a bit once they either had to go independent, or are on very fan base specific label. It just is what it is.

I really want to go deeper than that, because there are various things that make a lot of sense but even doing the math on a big name artist who didn't sell as well as had hoped, or an older artist who hit a higher point than expected, when you actually pay attention to sales, not numbers, it's kind of expected, IMO, that compromises were made. It's not just mixing, it's usually across the board.
You got a valid point.
Old 7th February 2017
  #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ANR2011 View Post
You got a valid point.
Trust me, the only reason I am trying to nail it against the wall is working in these budgets, it's tough because you know great music will happen, but corners are cut, and sometime badly. As I get older, I am becoming more of the "get off my lawn" type but people really want the quality, they just don't have the budget, even when they are selling albums, they are selling a small fraction of what they used to. It's unrealistic to expect an amazing mix these days, IMO. It's not that you can't get it, it's just really unobtainable for most. We just don't have the barrier to entry anymore that you either get something mixed, or not mixed. Now it can get done to some capacity, by almost anyone. Well, different story.
Old 7th February 2017
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3rd Degree View Post
It's unrealistic to expect an amazing mix these days, IMO. It's not that you can't get it, it's just really unobtainable for most. We just don't have the barrier to entry anymore that you either get something mixed, or not mixed. Now it can get done to some capacity, by almost anyone. Well, different story.
At the same time, the door is wide open for up and coming talent to do their thing and do it well if they're gifted or determined to put in the hard work to learn the ropes. Great tools are more affordable than ever, on almost all fronts. The only real excuse people have now is inexperience, or if not that, they just don't care to strive for any better.
Old 7th February 2017
  #26
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Old 7th February 2017
  #27
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A crap-ton of rap mixes sucked back in the day too. It's just that the ones that suck aren't really worth remembering. We tend to only remember the good stuff. In general the quality of mixes in rap have improved over the years. But just like back in the day, you still have people with horrible mixes that seem to blow up... why? Because they have songs that people want to hear and they are incredible at marketing themselves (intentionally or through dumb luck - doesn't matter).

Plus, to put it the way of friend of mine put it, "when I'm high as f*ck, I really just want some stupid s*it that doesn't make my brain work too hard."
Old 7th February 2017
  #28
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@ ANR2011 I'd take advice from a seasoned pro in a heartbeat as long as it's constructive and you seem like the type to give it.
@ chris carter who said that? That's what's wrong with Hip Hop overall.
Old 7th February 2017
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boombapdame View Post
@ ANR2011 I'd take advice from a seasoned pro in a heartbeat as long as it's constructive and you seem like the type to give it.

Thank You!. Unfortunately there are tons on youths that I've been running into along with some old artist's who still strive for success that seem to ignore 75% of the proper advice I mention. I'm far from a know it all and stay humble within the music environment because as most know changes occur in the Music of business on a annual basis & sometimes faster.

Today's Youth seem to be following there own path more then previous ones. My generation would listen to other's say 'Nice Demo' to that xxxtention rapper.. 'You should now consider recording it at a professional studio because you got a potential hit there'.. when the rapper says that they haven't money for that consider a part time job to fund their demo's etc..

Quality recorded songs last but demo style songs fad in time even amongst a newer generation, where there ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) is the highest it's been or even known in the new generation. Yes, CD's sales might be a thing of the past until a new format is discovered and mp3's hardly exist but with lives shows and streaming still pushing strong how much distortion noise will people be able to take?

I personality never wanted to be the old guy telling these kids..hey, do this and do that is my suggestion..or it doesn't sound good because when I was younger and started making beats with my friends whiles they Rapped I sometimes didn't like the old veteran Engineer's or Producer's telling me 'No..it has to be done like this'..but I sure learned to respect them and did stay humble along with that regardless of the hard work towards a better sounding recording. Even in today's times I go on these forum's for advice so the learning never stops ..but unfortunately A lot of egos seem to only grow and grow..for some.

Even when speaking to these kids ( and some older wannabes in the biz new to music) humbly they just don't care for any advice it seems. It seems that we are living in a generation where as people as a whole only like to give their own and not accept knowledgeable advice as a majority.

But thanks once again.!
Old 7th February 2017
  #30
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random thoughts:

i wonder what engineers sad about something like the kinks back in the day
the guitar is totaly distorted! those idiots put holes in the speakers

public enemy's sound must have been terrible for engineers. they were embracing distortion and dirt when everyone wanted to avoid it.

36 chambers also was mixed pretty badly but it's one of the most raw and most important hiphop albums ever.

heh i don't want to defend those kids. i don't like most of this new pop/trap/hop stuff. in fact i think it's uninspired and mostly plain stupid heh. but i think it's a rebellious youth thing to do it intentionally wrong. it's repeating again and again pushing it more and more.

"turn it up, y'all niggas must be outta ya head if your system ain't up to the red" (madib)
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heraldo_jones 1st February 2016
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