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Feedback and input?
Old 16th January 2019
  #1
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Feedback and input?

Hi!

I can imagine writing, producing and mixing on your own makes a tedious process. Your productions are often quite complex. How do you keep “sane” during this process - do you allow input/feedback from others at different stages?
Old 4 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr jkn View Post
Hi!

I can imagine writing, producing and mixing on your own makes a tedious process. Your productions are often quite complex. How do you keep “sane” during this process - do you allow input/feedback from others at different stages?
I don't stay sane. I really really really don't.

I'm a hot dumpster fire when writing an album and I don't recommend it to anyone haha. I only do it, because I psychologically have to!
Ikonoklasm calls me a wedge plow, because I work 10-12 hour days, get home and just go to town on music until 2-3 am, rinse repeat. It's pathological, I get obsessed with getting it right and through my life experiences, I've learned to be quite disciplined about it.
Sharing with people for input is a double edged sword and one edge cuts more than the other, so I try not to, in the early stages. Once the song is halfway developed and I'm very sure about the song, I'll play it to very select people and ask very specific questions rather than say "is it a good song?". That's burned me before and I'll take the song down a road I don't like for months, before I realize that's not what I want to be doing.
I'm also INCREDIBLY stubborn so if someone tells me a song "isn't one of my strongest" my first instinct will be to make a double album of songs just like that haha.
Overall it's a very abstract process and it leads to a LOT of histrionics and self-doubt, but I've found that after 3 albums, you start developing a pipeline and workflow so it's not AS bad.

It helps a lot that my day job is in visual effects and our clients, 99% of the time, are cheapskate jerks with insane expectations, which means that we have to build everything to be modular. That way, if they want Alien No53 to have 4 horns rather than 7 tentacles, we can do that because we prepared accordingly.
I bring that mentality into my music nowadays and keep most things open, work on clip sessions so I can try different combinations (Sunset Blood was all recorded in timeline view, which was excruciating) and generally try to keep it swappable for as long as I can before I start putting in filigrees and fills etc.
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Old 4 weeks ago
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I can relate to the psychological drive again and again pushing you into the rabbit hole that is music production! Your approach to external feedback really makes sense.

Thank you for pointing out the tedious nature of timeline arrangement during writing. I must now try out Bitwig.
Old 4 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr jkn View Post
I can relate to the psychological drive again and again pushing you into the rabbit hole that is music production! Your approach to external feedback really makes sense.

Thank you for pointing out the tedious nature of timeline arrangement during writing. I must now try out Bitwig.
Oh yeah, RUN, don't walk to Bitwig, it's completely redefined the process for me!
Old 4 weeks ago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starcadian View Post
Oh yeah, RUN, don't walk to Bitwig, it's completely redefined the process for me!
I’ll definitely do!
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