The No.1 Website for Pro Audio
 All  This Thread  Reviews  Gear Database  Gear for sale     Latest  Trending
What do you think about when you are mixing?
Old 26th April 2019
  #1
Gear Head
 

What do you think about when you are mixing?

Hi Andrew,

Thank you that you are here and answer our questions!


I have a question about eq and tonal balance. When i mix, i always use reference track to make sure my intruments are bright enough or has some other problems, but i saw your mixing courses and when you are mixing you never use reference tracks. So my question is: How i should know when i.e Vocal is too dark, or too bright or has some other problems without using reference? when you hit play for the first time and hear vocal,bass,drums... you have in your mind perfect balanced vocal(remembered),kick drum and if vocal is dark you add highs, if kick drum has too much boxinesss compared to your perfect kick drum you cut boxiness or how you know that vocal needs eq, how you know that balance beetween intruments are good without comparing another track?

Thanks in advance.

Best regards
Old 1st May 2019
  #2
Special Guest
 
AScheps's Avatar
 

It's hard to answer your question because there are concepts there that I don't really use when I mix. Things like the perfect kick drum, or how bright or dark a vocal should be aren't things that I think you can define. When you're starting out I think it's a great idea to use references just to make sure you're not doing something crazy, but you can't try to copy the reference, it just won't make any sense. What works in one mix very likely won't work in another mix. Every time I hit play I am listening to what I've got and trying to identify things I don't like yet. Usually when I come back to a mix after some time away from it (could be an hour could be a few days, whatever) that is when it's easiest to hear if I've really messed something up in terms of how bright the vocal is or something like that. But that's only in the context of that mix, not compared to some universal standard of vocal brightness. It's easy for me to say all this because I've been mixing for so long so I hear things in a way that helps me to stay consistent and I don't usually take a mix to a place that won't work and I have to start over. I do have to work really hard to make most mixes happen though. But the hard work is to make me like it, not to make it the same as the reference.

I hope some of this helps...
16
Share
Old 3rd May 2019
  #3
Here for the gear
 

Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by AScheps View Post
It's hard to answer your question because there are concepts there that I don't really use when I mix. Things like the perfect kick drum, or how bright or dark a vocal should be aren't things that I think you can define. When you're starting out I think it's a great idea to use references just to make sure you're not doing something crazy, but you can't try to copy the reference, it just won't make any sense. What works in one mix very likely won't work in another mix. Every time I hit play I am listening to what I've got and trying to identify things I don't like yet. Usually when I come back to a mix after some time away from it (could be an hour could be a few days, whatever) that is when it's easiest to hear if I've really messed something up in terms of how bright the vocal is or something like that. But that's only in the context of that mix, not compared to some universal standard of vocal brightness. It's easy for me to say all this because I've been mixing for so long so I hear things in a way that helps me to stay consistent and I don't usually take a mix to a place that won't work and I have to start over. I do have to work really hard to make most mixes happen though. But the hard work is to make me like it, not to make it the same as the reference.

I hope some of this helps...
Thank You! This is such great advice/insight.
Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Forum Jump
Forum Jump