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Processing Overheads that contain an overbearing snare sound
Old 25th April 2019
  #1
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valjean24601's Avatar
 

Processing Overheads that contain an overbearing snare sound

Hi Andrew,

Thanks so much for taking part in this, we're all learning so much.

I wanted to ask you how you deal with overhead tracks that might have a copious amount of snare drum in the capture - but perhaps that snare drum capture is negatively impacting/working against the close mic'ed snare signal. How do you reconcile the two?

I'm regularly receiving tracks to mix where the snare drum capture in the overheads completely clouds the close mic'ed signal and any attempts at processing the overheads to negate the effect, then in turn, negatively impacts the cymbals/kit picture. I'm struggling to find the balance with this issue.

Thanks so much for your inspiration,

Mark.
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Old 26th April 2019
  #2
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Wow, that's a tough one. There are lots of things to try, but it's impossible to know what might work.

I think I would start by trying some sidechain processing on the overheads. First would just be compressing keying off the snare mic. This will effectively duck the OHs whenever the snare hits so it should get out of the way of the close mic. The problem with this is that if it's a section with a lot of cymbals you'll probably hear it pumping. The next step would be keying a de-esser so that you are only taking out certain frequencies when the snare hits. You could probably suck out midrange, leaving the top alone so you don't hear it affecting the cymbals. I'm sure you've already tried these but it's the best I can come up with.

A last resort would be to add samples for the crashes and then blend them in so you can turn the overheads down, but that could also sound terrible.

This is why, unless I'm working with a phenomenal drummer in a great room I use the overhead mics as cymbal mics, not trying to capture the whole kit.
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Old 26th April 2019
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valjean24601's Avatar
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AScheps View Post
Wow, that's a tough one. There are lots of things to try, but it's impossible to know what might work.

I think I would start by trying some sidechain processing on the overheads. First would just be compressing keying off the snare mic. This will effectively duck the OHs whenever the snare hits so it should get out of the way of the close mic. The problem with this is that if it's a section with a lot of cymbals you'll probably hear it pumping. The next step would be keying a de-esser so that you are only taking out certain frequencies when the snare hits. You could probably suck out midrange, leaving the top alone so you don't hear it affecting the cymbals. I'm sure you've already tried these but it's the best I can come up with.

A last resort would be to add samples for the crashes and then blend them in so you can turn the overheads down, but that could also sound terrible.

This is why, unless I'm working with a phenomenal drummer in a great room I use the overhead mics as cymbal mics, not trying to capture the whole kit.
Hi Andrew,

Thank you so much for the reply, I'm extremely grateful. I have tried sidechaining the the overheads off the close snare mic but I encountered exactly the symptoms you stated - In sections with a lot of cymbal activity I was getting a lot of pumping.

I actually haven't tried keying a de-esser, or layering in cymbal samples, so i'll be opening up old projects and trying those later this evening.

Thanks so much again for your time, it's very much appreciated.

Mark.
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