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-   Product Alerts older than 2 months (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/product-alerts-older-than-2-months/)
-   -   TBProAudio releases DSEQ, a dynamic spectral equalizer for Windows and Mac OS X (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/product-alerts-older-than-2-months/1306847-tbproaudio-releases-dseq-dynamic-spectral-equalizer-windows-mac-os-x.html)

Ssamson 7th July 2020 12:41 PM

Anyone here from the Acustica thread?... just saying...

alibling 7th July 2020 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Samson Sounds (Post 14843406)
Anyone here from the Acustica thread?... just saying...

lolabduction

uarte 8th July 2020 02:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JfromRVA (Post 14839929)
The most responsive developer I've encountered on GS. DSEQ deserves to be plugin of the year. Now we need developer of the year award for actually listening to the users!

Agreed! +1! rockout

loudscape 17th July 2020 01:23 AM

I've been playing with the demo to remove excessive and harsh drum leakage from grand piano and upright bass mics. So far the results have been pretty convincing, at least more musical sounding than static lo pass filters. I'm just curious if there is anyone else who's used DSEQ (or MSpectralDynamics) in a similar manner? Any tips or tricks or traps to avoid? Thanks.

Qiy 17th July 2020 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loudscape (Post 14862121)
I've been playing with the demo to remove excessive and harsh drum leakage from grand piano and upright bass mics. So far the results have been pretty convincing, at least more musical sounding than static lo pass filters. I'm just curious if there is anyone else who's used DSEQ (or MSpectralDynamics) in a similar manner? Any tips or tricks or traps to avoid? Thanks.

I am using DSEQ to tame the harshness from bad recording vocals.
For vocals, be sure to maintain a lower MIX and a higher threshold, and even adjust the degree of selectivity.

This will significantly increase the smoothness of the vocals.rockout

Detch 20th July 2020 12:59 PM

Thank you for this plugin. It just saved my mix.

Eric Stravinsky 21st July 2020 02:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qiy (Post 14862550)
I am using DSEQ to tame the harshness from bad recording vocals.
For vocals, be sure to maintain a lower MIX and a higher threshold, and even adjust the degree of selectivity.

This will significantly increase the smoothness of the vocals.rockout

Would you care to post any example settings?
Thanks.

V4nger 21st July 2020 05:16 PM

Bought!

I own soothe2 and that's got a few special uses. But it's way too fiddly to work with, especially in comparison to DSEQ.

DSEQ is easily the best transparent tonal conditioner for audio. It'll remove that nasty harshness and clear mud so well with very little messing.

And the controls are just so straight forward making it a breeze to work with and get a great sound quickly.

I also like the fact that it doesn't have a sound of, what I might call, 'ultramaths' like soothe/soothe2. That's the made up word which makes sense when I hear what I shouldn't be able to hear in soothe. I think it must be to do with the interpolation between the analysis windows, even with ultra quality. It sounds great, don't get me wrong. But there is a sound to it and DSEQ just sounds natural instead of processed.

I actually dig the Normal resolution. Just works, for me.

abduction

Beatworld 25th July 2020 09:27 AM

A report which might help someone else.

Until now I've only been using stereo instances of DSEQ.
I've got two new mixes going from scratch and so for the first time I've been using mono instances of DSEQ on mono tracks.
I couldn't for the life of me work out what was causing short audio drop outs on some of the tracks .....

Turns out I had to activate the mono instances as well.
I just assumed that, as I had activated the stereo version about 8 weeks ago, the mono instances would be good to go.
But when I drilled down in the tracks where the drop outs were happening all mono instances of DSEQ were running in demo mode :)

Phew freshflowe

TBProAudio 25th July 2020 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beatworld (Post 14877803)
Turns out I had to activate the mono instances as well.

Right. We should state this much more prominently... :cowbell:

Edit: we just added a note to chapter 9 (activation) in the manual ;)

V4nger 25th July 2020 06:14 PM

I just wrote out, over the day, a few well written paragraphs of feedback but my internet just disappeared as I chose the advanced post thing and lost it all bar the last paragraph I copied. I thought I'd copied the whole thing to clipboard! Ahhh well.

The basic gist was that I've found that the default setting on DSEQ is great, I'm going to mostly use that unless it just doesn't work and I'll mess with it. I like the approach of using these advanced tools in the simplest possible way. I used it last night with 6db slope instead of the default 3db, pulling down the threshold until I was happy and got a coherent fundamental mix on about 50 channels of electronic beats and bass in under an hour. Super good!

Also, I am extremely interested to see where the development of DSEQ goes as I come up against the limitations of the processing methods in use in the current version of the plugin.

I say this because I have found, in my limited use of DSEQ, the limits of its capabilities in different scenarios. For example, when using this to control and shape the low end of a sub heavy synthetic bass line I run into glitching with different quality and OS settings. For example, I am using High quality with no oversampling. I can push a maximum of 6dB-ish of GR before crackling starts to take place in the high end. There are no high frequencies to suppress so this appears to be a result of the processing going on in the low end.

Another example I found was in using DSEQ on a thick analog synth sample. I experimented with steep slopes of 7-9dB. In whatever Quality/OS settings I chose, there would be crackling when the high frequencies crossed the threshold, regardless of whether I used super low threshold or GR ratios less than 1x. On plenty of other synth sounds like pads and riffs it would be fine but on this particular sound it would produce these crackles. I know I'm not the first in this thread to mention the glitching you can find in the processing techniques of DSEQ when used on certain sounds.

It's not fully clear to me why this is happening. When I tried the oversampling options I got extreme crackling with this particular sound so this suggests to me that the processing is not comparable with the surgical operation of soothe2 which retains full clarity of the source regardless of the depth of processing in use. The different Quality and Oversampling settings all act like different modes of operation in comparison to soothe's window and oversampling settings. soothe's quality/OS settings are simply cleaner and more accurate versions of the same basic style of operation. DSEQ sounds like it has very different styles of processing depending on the chosen settings. Which is cool and makes it more versatile in being faithful to the user's perception of the source audio! But I'm essentially going to stick to a single quality setting for an entire project unless it really doesn't suit a sound.

I found that I reached a kind of subtly incoherent mix which was less pleasing to me when I was putting DSEQ through its paces by custom processing each drum channel on this piece I was working on last night, called Bounty Hunter, setting each control available to fit the sound as I saw fit. When I switched out every instance of DSEQ I'd used so far for the init patch with my chosen 6dB slope, all I did was bring down the threshold and switch the channel processing from L/R to M/S for some sounds to give them a different feel in the mix. M/S sounds nice and wide! At the end of that, after I'd processed each channel in the track with DSEQ as the first processor in the chain, I had a solid and coherent mix along with the other processing I had in place so far. Winning! For the two bass sounds in the track I used High Quality instead of default Normal.

DSEQ has made me re-evaluate soothe2 and I have found that I genuinely enjoy the sound of Normal Quality in that plugin over the High and Ultra settings, for most sounds. I feel like this is because it provides the foundational vibe of the mathematicians DSP techniques inside the plugin. It feels more natural by being less technically precise. As I said in my previous post in this thread, I love the sound of Normal Quality in DSEQ as well!

So far in my experience I have found that DSEQ is great for bringing a mix to a cohesive balance very quickly with unparalleled workflow, especially when using the default setting! soothe2 is far superior in being heavy handed and virtually pinpoint accurate with what it does. Try this: take Blue Cat's gain plugins (https://www.bluecataudio.com/Product...uct_GainSuite/), inverse link and slam 30db or more signal into the algorithm. You'll be able to completely carve up the sound with this method. soothe2 can simply cut into the sound with perfect surgical precision.

Conversely, the workflow with DSEQ is far superior for having clean stepped controls. It also works more predictably due to the slope control being the exact curve that DSEQ will work along allowing the user to process elements in a mix to fit a particular frequency curve, killing only the frequencies which hit the threshold. soothe seems to detect resonances by analysing the signal as a whole even before it touches the threshold.

DSEQ is a fantastic tool with limits in functionality, which are unclear until you use it on many different sounds. There is no suggestion in the manual that glitches will take place in unexpected ways when used on certain sounds or simply too heavily. I hope that strange occurrences such as the glitches in the high end when processing sub frequencies, especially when using 2x and 4x oversampling, can be eliminated. This may simply be a limitation of the DSP in use but nonetheless, it does not hold up to the ultimate surgical standard of processing present in soothe2. Used as a moderate to subtle polish and balancer, DSEQ is unbelievably good and sounds very pleasant indeed. It is the auto mix fixer I've been wanting since finding Sonible's SmartEQ range of processors. Usability with DSEQ is top notch!! It is also very capable of radically reshaping a sound but how it will handle each sound is actually quite unpredictable in comparison with soothe2.

soothe2 is very straightforward in that its basic functionality with low GR is essentially the same operation all the way through to complete removal of everything meaningful in a sound and lends itself far more readily to absurd sound design capabilities and radical reshaping of the source when driven with enough level as per my hot tip I mentioned earlier in the post. It is definitely a more advanced algorithm, to my mind, as the integrity of the audio is maintained at virtually every quality/OS setting.

yingyang

Looks like I managed to say everything again in different wording and order. So that's my feedback thus far!

heppy

BigSmo 25th July 2020 11:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by V4nger (Post 14878518)
I just wrote out, over the day, a few well written paragraphs of feedback but my internet just disappeared as I chose the advanced post thing and lost it all bar the last paragraph I copied. I thought I'd copied the whole thing to clipboard! Ahhh well.

The basic gist was that I've found that the default setting on DSEQ is great, I'm going to mostly use that unless it just doesn't work and I'll mess with it. I like the approach of using these advanced tools in the simplest possible way. I used it last night with 6db slope instead of the default 3db, pulling down the threshold until I was happy and got a coherent fundamental mix on about 50 channels of electronic beats and bass in under an hour. Super good!

Also, I am extremely interested to see where the development of DSEQ goes as I come up against the limitations of the processing methods in use in the current version of the plugin.

I say this because I have found, in my limited use of DSEQ, the limits of its capabilities in different scenarios. For example, when using this to control and shape the low end of a sub heavy synthetic bass line I run into glitching with different quality and OS settings. For example, I am using High quality with no oversampling. I can push a maximum of 6dB-ish of GR before crackling starts to take place in the high end. There are no high frequencies to suppress so this appears to be a result of the processing going on in the low end.

Another example I found was in using DSEQ on a thick analog synth sample. I experimented with steep slopes of 7-9dB. In whatever Quality/OS settings I chose, there would be crackling when the high frequencies crossed the threshold, regardless of whether I used super low threshold or GR ratios less than 1x. On plenty of other synth sounds like pads and riffs it would be fine but on this particular sound it would produce these crackles. I know I'm not the first in this thread to mention the glitching you can find in the processing techniques of DSEQ when used on certain sounds.

It's not fully clear to me why this is happening. When I tried the oversampling options I got extreme crackling with this particular sound so this suggests to me that the processing is not comparable with the surgical operation of soothe2 which retains full clarity of the source regardless of the depth of processing in use. The different Quality and Oversampling settings all act like different modes of operation in comparison to soothe's window and oversampling settings. soothe's quality/OS settings are simply cleaner and more accurate versions of the same basic style of operation. DSEQ sounds like it has very different styles of processing depending on the chosen settings. Which is cool and makes it more versatile in being faithful to the user's perception of the source audio! But I'm essentially going to stick to a single quality setting for an entire project unless it really doesn't suit a sound.

I found that I reached a kind of subtly incoherent mix which was less pleasing to me when I was putting DSEQ through its paces by custom processing each drum channel on this piece I was working on last night, called Bounty Hunter, setting each control available to fit the sound as I saw fit. When I switched out every instance of DSEQ I'd used so far for the init patch with my chosen 6dB slope, all I did was bring down the threshold and switch the channel processing from L/R to M/S for some sounds to give them a different feel in the mix. M/S sounds nice and wide! At the end of that, after I'd processed each channel in the track with DSEQ as the first processor in the chain, I had a solid and coherent mix along with the other processing I had in place so far. Winning! For the two bass sounds in the track I used High Quality instead of default Normal.

DSEQ has made me re-evaluate soothe2 and I have found that I genuinely enjoy the sound of Normal Quality in that plugin over the High and Ultra settings, for most sounds. I feel like this is because it provides the foundational vibe of the mathematicians DSP techniques inside the plugin. It feels more natural by being less technically precise. As I said in my previous post in this thread, I love the sound of Normal Quality in DSEQ as well!

So far in my experience I have found that DSEQ is great for bringing a mix to a cohesive balance very quickly with unparalleled workflow, especially when using the default setting! soothe2 is far superior in being heavy handed and virtually pinpoint accurate with what it does. Try this: take Blue Cat's gain plugins (https://www.bluecataudio.com/Product...uct_GainSuite/), inverse link and slam 30db or more signal into the algorithm. You'll be able to completely carve up the sound with this method. soothe2 can simply cut into the sound with perfect surgical precision.

Conversely, the workflow with DSEQ is far superior for having clean stepped controls. It also works more predictably due to the slope control being the exact curve that DSEQ will work along allowing the user to process elements in a mix to fit a particular frequency curve, killing only the frequencies which hit the threshold. soothe seems to detect resonances by analysing the signal as a whole even before it touches the threshold.

DSEQ is a fantastic tool with limits in functionality, which are unclear until you use it on many different sounds. There is no suggestion in the manual that glitches will take place in unexpected ways when used on certain sounds or simply too heavily. I hope that strange occurrences such as the glitches in the high end when processing sub frequencies, especially when using 2x and 4x oversampling, can be eliminated. This may simply be a limitation of the DSP in use but nonetheless, it does not hold up to the ultimate surgical standard of processing present in soothe2. Used as a moderate to subtle polish and balancer, DSEQ is unbelievably good and sounds very pleasant indeed. It is the auto mix fixer I've been wanting since finding Sonible's SmartEQ range of processors. Usability with DSEQ is top notch!! It is also very capable of radically reshaping a sound but how it will handle each sound is actually quite unpredictable in comparison with soothe2.

soothe2 is very straightforward in that its basic functionality with low GR is essentially the same operation all the way through to complete removal of everything meaningful in a sound and lends itself far more readily to absurd sound design capabilities and radical reshaping of the source when driven with enough level as per my hot tip I mentioned earlier in the post. It is definitely a more advanced algorithm, to my mind, as the integrity of the audio is maintained at virtually every quality/OS setting.

yingyang

Looks like I managed to say everything again in different wording and order. So that's my feedback thus far!

heppy

Say that again mate? ;)

V4nger 26th July 2020 12:49 AM

uhhh, did I say passionate?

TBProAudio 26th July 2020 05:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by V4nger (Post 14878518)
...
So far in my experience I have found that DSEQ is great for bringing a mix to a cohesive balance very quickly with unparalleled workflow, especially when using the default setting! soothe2 is far superior in being heavy handed and virtually pinpoint accurate with what it does. Try this: take Blue Cat's gain plugins (https://www.bluecataudio.com/Product...uct_GainSuite/), inverse link and slam 30db or more signal into the algorithm. You'll be able to completely carve up the sound with this method. soothe2 can simply cut into the sound with perfect surgical precision...

Hmm, it is easy to overdue with DSEQ. Then starts crackling ... ;)

V4nger 26th July 2020 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBProAudio (Post 14880225)
Hmm, it is easy to overdue with DSEQ. Then starts crackling ... ;)

Indeed. I think your product is incredible. DSEQ is a powerful tool.

JfromRVA 27th July 2020 12:41 AM

After some more time and really getting to know DSEQ in my workflow I really like DSEQ on distorted guitar right before a tape sim or other saturation method. DSEQ seems to pave the way for the Tape sim to do it's magic because DSEQ as already performed its magic!

TBProAudio 27th July 2020 06:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JfromRVA (Post 14880858)
After some more time and really getting to know DSEQ in my workflow I really like DSEQ on distorted guitar right before a tape sim or other saturation method. DSEQ seems to pave the way for the Tape sim to do it's magic because DSEQ as already performed its magic!

This sounds interesting, need to try, thank you. kfhkh

Another thing: has anyone tried DSEQ together with Autotune?
As seen in a video DSEQ seems to reduce artefacts in a "autotuned" track...

alibling 27th July 2020 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBProAudio (Post 14881192)
This sounds interesting, need to try, thank you. kfhkh

Another thing: has anyone tried DSEQ together with Autotune?
As seen in a video DSEQ seems to reduce artefacts in a "autotuned" track...

interessting. so after autotune dseq? I use it normally before autotune.

B.Collins 27th July 2020 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TBProAudio (Post 14881192)
This sounds interesting, need to try, thank you. kfhkh

Another thing: has anyone tried DSEQ together with Autotune?
As seen in a video DSEQ seems to reduce artefacts in a "autotuned" track...

The best way to reduce artefacts in an "autotuned" track is the delete button :lol:

B.Collins 27th July 2020 08:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by V4nger (Post 14878518)
DSEQ has made me re-evaluate soothe2 and I have found that I genuinely enjoy the sound of Normal Quality in that plugin over the High and Ultra settings, for most sounds.

Except in a few cases, this is very much so.

TBProAudio 27th July 2020 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alibling (Post 14881215)
interessting. so after autotune dseq? I use it normally before autotune.

I guess before improves detection capabilities of Autotune.
After should reduce outstanding over tones and artefacts.

trevon 27th July 2020 10:52 AM

Idk y but I love using this with soft selectivity and the threshold really low. It makes everything less bright n dark but In a good way. Especially with custom threshold. I'm not sure how to use the filters yet, because I'm confused on what they do exactly. I know if I want it to focus on a certain frequency, but what is the point in the different frequencies. In understand them in terms of eq but not really this as much as

TBProAudio 27th July 2020 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trevon (Post 14881405)
Idk y but I love using this with soft selectivity and the threshold really low. It makes everything less bright n dark but In a good way. Especially with custom threshold. I'm not sure how to use the filters yet, because I'm confused on what they do exactly. I know if I want it to focus on a certain frequency, but what is the point in the different frequencies. In understand them in terms of eq but not really this as much as

Pre-filter usage: just start with the default preset and lower threshold until you see the GR curve allor over the spectrum view.

Now active pre-filer 1 and select low-cut type. Now change the frequency to e.g. 1kHz and watch the GR curve. If you have track with strong lows you should hear the effect as well :-)

In fact the pre-filters control what is fed into the dynamic EQs: if there is a strong signal in a certain frequency range the dEQs connected to this range work, if there is no/low signal the dEQs will be in idle (this this example).

I hope this helps.

JfromRVA 27th July 2020 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trevon (Post 14881405)
Idk y but I love using this with soft selectivity and the threshold really low. It makes everything less bright n dark but In a good way. Especially with custom threshold.

I need to try this out. I've been using the custom threshold, setting attack/release, max GR to -3db, and dialing in the threshold. I'll adjust the slope if I want to focus more on the highs or lows. Pre-filters to target the low mids when needed.

Gonna give your settings a go!

E-Irizarry 30th July 2020 04:27 AM

Your Top 15 Plugins That You Can't Live Without - 2019 Edition

Neptune45 30th July 2020 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by E-Irizarry (Post 14886986)

Have you compared to Gullfoss? I have both Soothe and Gullfoss and am wondering whether to spend time looking in to this one?

Thanks.

vitocorleone123 30th July 2020 03:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neptune45 (Post 14887719)
Have you compared to Gullfoss? I have both Soothe and Gullfoss and am wondering whether to spend time looking in to this one?

Thanks.

There's a little overlap, but Gullfoss does what it does best. DSEQ can do something a bit similar, though. The greatest overlap is with Soothe, leading me to buy DSEQ instead of Soothe.

Why don't you try the DSEQ demo?

Neptune45 30th July 2020 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vitocorleone123 (Post 14887763)
There's a little overlap, but Gullfoss does what it does best. DSEQ can do something a bit similar, though. The greatest overlap is with Soothe, leading me to buy DSEQ instead of Soothe.

Why don't you try the DSEQ demo?

Yeah I will give it a go. Cheers.

JfromRVA 31st July 2020 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vitocorleone123 (Post 14887763)
There's a little overlap, but Gullfoss does what it does best. DSEQ can do something a bit similar, though. The greatest overlap is with Soothe, leading me to buy DSEQ instead of Soothe.

Why don't you try the DSEQ demo?

I agree. For me, DSEQ is a problem solver. when using the custom threshold in my workflow in the early stage of a mix it helps me avoid problems all together.

I caved and bought Gullfoss a couple of weeks ago. It just has a special kind of magic. My wallet disagreed :facepalm:

Eric Stravinsky 17th August 2020 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Neptune45 (Post 14887765)
Yeah I will give it a go. Cheers.

Have you tried it yet?