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AES 2019: Steinberg Launches UR-C Series of USB 3.0 Audio Interfaces
Old 30th September 2019
  #1
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Hardware AES 2019: Steinberg Launches UR-C Series of USB 3.0 Audio Interfaces


Steinberg today announced the immediate availability of its new range of audio interfaces, comprising the UR22C, the UR44C and the UR22C Recording Pack. An additional UR816C rackmount interface will be released in November.

Designed for musicians and producers, the entire line-up of UR-C audio interfaces provides USB Type-C (USB 3.1 Gen 1 SuperSpeed) connectivity to ensure universal compatibility with both PCs and Mac computers, as well as iOS devices. Every model features 32-bit/192 kHz audio resolution, MIDI and delivers DSP power for using effects when monitoring audio without latency. Alongside the dspMixFx mixer that accesses the DSP effects, each interface comes with a comprehensive software bundle: the Cubase AI music production software, the Basic FX Suite consisting of effects and sound processing tools, and the iOS Cubasis LE iPad music production app.

Boasting a compact design for optimum portability, the UR22C has two balanced Neutrik combo inputs, each with a Yamaha D-PRE microphone preamp behind it. The rear panel holds the MIDI ports and two balanced line outputs. Another highlight is that the UR22C can be bus powered by Windows or Mac computers which follow the USB 3.0 or USB-C standard.

The UR44C offers increased I/O options, with four balanced Neutrik combo inputs each feeding into a D-PRE preamp plus two headphone jacks on the front panel. There are two additional balanced line inputs, four balanced line outputs plus a main stereo output and MIDI in and out on the backside. The UR44C can be powered from any USB-C equipped Mac or Windows computer as well as the iPad Pro.

The UR816C is a 1U rack-mountable interface perfect for medium-sized recording studio setups. It features eight balanced Neutrik combo inputs, together with the D-PRE preamps, eight balanced line outputs and two ADAT ports for a total of 16 channels. It has MIDI and word clock connection which is powered by SSPLL jitter reduction technology.

The UR22C Recording Pack provides all the hardware and software required to create studio-quality recordings with a Mac computer, PC or iPad. Including the UR22C, with all its outstanding features and the included large software bundle with the additional WaveLab LE audio editor, the UR22C Recording Pack also comes with the ST-M01 studio condenser microphone, offering a wide frequency response range that picks up every nuance, alongside the ST-H01 studio monitor headphones.

Steinberg’s Senior Marketing Manager, Stefan Schreiber, commented: “I’m very excited to introduce this new line of audio interfaces. Not only do they offer one of the latest standards in USB connectivity, but also set a very high standard with their 32-bit/192 kHz resolution. Each piece of hardware sounds great, the build quality is simply next level, and the wide range offered covers all demands put into the hardware. Together these interfaces offer a feature set that is without parallel.”

Availability and pricing
The UR-C audio interfaces are available through the Steinberg Online Shop and from resellers. Availability may vary by region. The suggested retail price for the UR22C is US $239.00. The suggested retail price for the UR44C is US $439.00. The suggested retail price for the UR816C is US $789.00. The suggested retail price for the UR22C Recording Pack is US $439.00.

UR22C key features
  • 32-bit Integer/192 kHz USB 3.0 audio interface with USB-C
  • 2 Class-A D-PRE mic preamps supporting +48 V phantom power
  • 2 analog XLR/TRS combo inputs (Hi-Z switch on input 2 for electric guitar) and 2 TRS main outputs
  • Latency-free DSP-powered monitoring with REV-X reverb, Channel Strip and Guitar Amp Classics (VST 3 and AU plug-in versions also included) alongside monitor mix knob and mono switch
  • USB 3.0 bus-power operation (optional power supply required for USB 2.0)
  • MIDI input and output
  • Rugged metal casing
  • Includes Cubase AI DAW software download version and Cubasis LE for iPad
  • dspMixFx editor application for Windows, macOS and iOS
  • Cross-platform compatibility for Windows, macOS and iOS

UR44C key features
  • 32-bit Integer/192 kHz USB 3.0 audio interface with USB-C
  • 4 Class-A D-PRE mic preamps supporting +48 V phantom power
  • 4 analog XLR/TRS combo inputs (2 Mic/Hi-Z and 2 Mic/Line), 2 TRS line inputs, 4 TRS line outputs and 2 main outputs
  • Latency-free DSP-powered monitoring with REV-X reverb, Channel Strip and Guitar Amp Classics (VST 3 and AU plug-in versions also included)
  • Bus-power operation possible if directly connected to USB Type-C port
  • 2 separate headphone buses with individual outputs
  • MIDI input and output
  • Rugged metal casing
  • Includes Cubase AI DAW software download version and Cubasis LE for iPad
  • Cross-platform connectivity for Windows, macOS and iOS including dspMixFx editor application

UR816C key features
  • 32-bit/192 kHz USB 3.0 audio interface with USB-C
  • 8 Class-A D-PRE mic preamps supporting +48 V phantom power
  • 8 analog XLR/TRS combo inputs (2 Mic/Hi-Z and 6 Mic/Line), 8 TRS line outputs and 2 main outputs
  • ADAT optical I/O, word clock I/O and MIDI input and output
  • Latency-free DSP-powered monitoring with REV-X reverb, Channel Strip and Guitar Amp Classics (VST 3 and AU plug-in versions also included)
  • 2 separate headphone buses with individual outputs
  • DIM and MUTE switches on the front panel
  • SSPLL (Super Suppression PLL) technology for clock jitter reduction
  • Includes Cubase AI DAW software download version and Cubasis LE for iPad
  • Cross-platform compatibility for Windows, macOS and iOS including dspMixFx editor application

UR22C Recording Pack key features
  • 32-bit/192 kHz USB 3.0 audio interface with USB-C
  • 2 Class-A D-PRE mic preamps supporting +48 V phantom power
  • 2 analog XLR/TRS combo inputs (Hi-Z switch on input 2 for electric guitar) and 2 TRS main outputs
  • Latency-free DSP-powered monitoring with REV-X reverb, Channel Strip and Guitar Amp Classics (VST 3 and AU plug-in versions also included)
  • USB 3.0 bus-power operation (optional power supply required for USB 2.0)
  • MIDI input and output
  • Cross-platform compatibility for Windows, macOS and iOS
  • ST-M01 studio condenser microphone with low-noise microphone cable
  • ST-H01 studio monitor headphones
  • Cross-platform compatibility for Windows, OS X and iOS with Cubase AI, WaveLab LE and Cubasis LE music software included


Link : www.steinberg.net/urc

Attached Thumbnails
AES 2019: Steinberg Launches UR-C Series of USB 3.0 Audio Interfaces-steinberg-urc-family.jpg  
Old 30th September 2019
  #2
Gear Addict
 

Steinberg haven't even put them up on their website yet. Even tried it via the link provided.

Edit: Finally they are up - can have a closer look now.
Old 30th September 2019
  #3
Back:



Old 30th September 2019
  #4
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by imaginaryday View Post
Back:



Cheers for that, couldn't find pics of the back anywhere on their site when looking earlier.
Old 1st October 2019
  #5
Here for the gear
 

What does everyone think about these vs the older ur-rt2/4 interfaces? They look like mostly an upgrade but lack the "switchable Rupert Neve Designs input transformers". I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than I can comment on if that's a major disadvantage or not, or if maybe those interfaces will also get an update to usb c 3.1.
Thanks for any replies
Old 1st October 2019
  #6
zerocold, it's not released yet.
Old 1st October 2019
  #7
Gear Head
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocold View Post
or if maybe those interfaces will also get an update to usb c 3.1.
Thanks for any replies
only thing that matters here is the connection type and that's the much needed / bus-power-able USB-C

... and the driver/software side of course!

USB 3.1 isn't faster (just 'broader') than USB 3.0 and I don't see the advantage for an audio interface with less than 300 channels
Old 1st October 2019
  #8
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocold View Post
What does everyone think about these vs the older ur-rt2/4 interfaces? They look like mostly an upgrade but lack the "switchable Rupert Neve Designs input transformers". I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than I can comment on if that's a major disadvantage or not, or if maybe those interfaces will also get an update to usb c 3.1.
Thanks for any replies
It's a marketing strategy, that's all.Steinberg could have implemented the USB3.0 into their UR MKII, and UR Rt series, but what they're doing here is an obvious greedy attempt to sell more units by releasing each year new audio interface with little improvements. Just make it once as it should be done, take for example RME and be done with it. But no.It's all about profits.
Old 1st October 2019
  #9
Gear Maniac
no additional dsp algo's from ur822?
Old 1st October 2019
  #10
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocold View Post
What does everyone think about these vs the older ur-rt2/4 interfaces? They look like mostly an upgrade but lack the "switchable Rupert Neve Designs input transformers". I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than I can comment on if that's a major disadvantage or not, or if maybe those interfaces will also get an update to usb c 3.1.
Thanks for any replies
Not tried the Neve design but the for the "regular" versions, the pre-amps are meant for a clean gained signal whereas my guess is that like the Neve consoles, the Neve versions would probably add some "colour" or "girth" to your sound on the way in. Not sure whether in the box I just prefer to get everything in as "clean" sounding as possible and then make creative choices from there with plugins. You could always come out of the box later on and sum to analogue and use any outboard gear you have then...(Just depends if you think the Neve sound is worth the extra price).

Also I don't see an update to the newer USB protocol (3.1 Gen2) coming for these. Type c just refers to the form - i.e. the shape of the connector (the ones where it doesn't matter which way up it is). It's the Generation that's about speed and bandwidth. The nomenclature does get confusing for the consumer I find. I don't think that these will suffer latency issues for a good few years in any event. Just make sure your Motherboard is compatible with whatever you choose to get. For example some people would have to get a PCI-e card for the Gen2 and Type c.

Thunderbolt 3 fits in to type c connections but doesn't mean it will be compatible with the motherboard as it is a different protocol again (even more bandwidth).

I am looking at these, RME and UAD interfaces - decisions decisions.
Old 1st October 2019
  #11
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zohomoho's Avatar
 

Still dig the d-pres after all these years. Some of the best interface preamps.
Old 1st October 2019
  #12
Gear Addict
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zohomoho View Post
Still dig the d-pres after all these years. Some of the best interface preamps.
Agreed and the drivers are always solid. Very clean pre-amps right up until that last tiny turn.
Old 1st October 2019
  #13
Gear Addict
 

Also for what you get with these in comparison to competition is very good like half the price...
Old 1st October 2019
  #14
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by zerocold View Post
What does everyone think about these vs the older ur-rt2/4 interfaces? They look like mostly an upgrade but lack the "switchable Rupert Neve Designs input transformers". I'm hoping someone more knowledgeable than I can comment on if that's a major disadvantage or not, or if maybe those interfaces will also get an update to usb c 3.1.
Thanks for any replies
They always had the UR line, they are just upgrading to USB-C. This is not an upgrade to the RT line. That's a different (higher end?) Interface line.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #15
Gear Addict
 

Aside from the USB-C interface, it seems they are touting the unit's "32-bit/192 kHz" audio. I guess that is similar to their higher-end AXR4T (32-bit/384 kHz).

A lot of players in this sub-$1,000 audio interface space. Focusrite, Audient, UA. Now that Steinberg is owned by Yamaha, I wonder if the quality of the pre's and converters make this a contender.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #16
Lives for gear
 
doom64's Avatar
Unless this interface has a -192 dBFS analog signal to noise ratio, the 32-bit integer part is a joke. My guess is they don't even go as low as 24-bit (-144 dBFS).

It's nonsense like these specs that make me avoid companies like this. They think we're stupid and I don't like being insulted. Thus, my money will go elsewhere.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #17
Gear Maniac
 

I was waiting for this to come out, I need more channels but didn’t really want to get into a UR824 since they are so old now. Can’t really say this is much of an upgrade from that...

Looks like I’m going for the MOTU 828es!
Old 2nd October 2019
  #18
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doom64's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pewtershmit View Post
I was waiting for this to come out, I need more channels but didn’t really want to get into a UR824 since they are so old now. Can’t really say this is much of an upgrade from that...

Looks like I’m going for the MOTU 828es!
You won't be disappointed. I'm looking to get one early next year for the pre-converter send feature alone. I know of only one other interface that can do that.

Plus the outputs should be stellar, of course! Stable, high quality and versatile = good times.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #19
Quote:
Originally Posted by doom64 View Post
Unless this interface has a -192 dBFS analog signal to noise ratio, the 32-bit integer part is a joke. My guess is they don't even go as low as 24-bit (-144 dBFS).

It's nonsense like these specs that make me avoid companies like this. They think we're stupid and I don't like being insulted. Thus, my money will go elsewhere.
I don't get this although I do agree with you that specs don't paint the full picture.
Isn't it ultimately the sound that matters? And if the sound is improved by implementing a higher spec'ed converter, why wouldn't they?
I don't think companies are out to insult by improving products. Companies need to improve products or they'll be left behind. So why would Steinberg, in this case, leave out a component that differentiates them from the rest of the crowd in their marketing?
Old 2nd October 2019
  #20
Gear Head
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pewtershmit View Post
I was waiting for this to come out, I need more channels but didn’t really want to get into a UR824 since they are so old now. Can’t really say this is much of an upgrade from that...

Looks like I’m going for the MOTU 828es!
For the long run I would suggest strongly RME interfaces, for stability, drivers, sound etc. You get one and forget about it. Not like Steinberg each year refurbishing their audio interfaces with small improvements just for the sake of their profits.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #21
Gear Maniac
 

The 44 now is bus powered via USB C. That's an improvement compared to the USB2 version.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #22
Gear Maniac
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savana Violenta View Post
For the long run I would suggest strongly RME interfaces, for stability, drivers, sound etc. You get one and forget about it. Not like Steinberg each year refurbishing their audio interfaces with small improvements just for the sake of their profits.
I would agree, but they are too much $$$$ 828es is under 1000
Old 2nd October 2019
  #23
Lives for gear
Quote:
Originally Posted by Savana Violenta View Post
It's a marketing strategy, that's all.Steinberg could have implemented the USB3.0 into their UR MKII, and UR Rt series, but what they're doing here is an obvious greedy attempt to sell more units by releasing each year new audio interface with little improvements. Just make it once as it should be done, take for example RME and be done with it. But no.It's all about profits.
What on earth are you on about? The previous gen interfaces have been out 7-10 years practically unchanged, this looks like and upgrade to USB 3.1/C plus adding dsp to the baby interface. I'm sure a USB3.1/C version of the RT models will be along shortly - aren't manufacturers allowed to improve their interfaces? Steinberg are not one of those companies changing everything every 2 years - I suspect these will be in production for 5+ years like their predecessors. As an ex UR44 owner I must say it was a brilliant interface - loved it.
Old 2nd October 2019
  #24
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doom64's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slogun View Post
I don't get this although I do agree with you that specs don't paint the full picture.
Isn't it ultimately the sound that matters? And if the sound is improved by implementing a higher spec'ed converter, why wouldn't they?
I don't think companies are out to insult by improving products. Companies need to improve products or they'll be left behind. So why would Steinberg, in this case, leave out a component that differentiates them from the rest of the crowd in their marketing?
The entire reason someone would want to record at 32-bit integer would be for the very low digital quantization noise floor. Every six decibels (give or take, I think it's 6.02 dB exactly) is equal to 1 bit.

If the analog noise floor doesn't even go lower than -144 dBFS (24-bit) then it is just wasted hard drive space, RAM and CPU. The lower I have ever seen in the real world is about -121 dBFS with line inputs and nothing plugged in.

Sure, put a higher spec'd converter in but don't try to fool the ill informed with bigger numbers. It is insulting. At 32-bit integer, you will gain nothing in quality but lose in other areas.
Old 3rd October 2019
  #25
OMU
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I think they're simply using new conversion chips from the likes of ESS or AKM etc. And those companies decided to start manufacturing 32bit converters, you know, the crazy audiophile market and all that. It really is that simple. OTOH I think mixing 32bit files would be slightly less taxing on the cpu.

Last edited by OMU; 3rd October 2019 at 04:34 PM..
Old 3rd October 2019
  #26
Quote:
Originally Posted by doom64 View Post
The entire reason someone would want to record at 32-bit integer would be for the very low digital quantization noise floor. Every six decibels (give or take, I think it's 6.02 dB exactly) is equal to 1 bit.

If the analog noise floor doesn't even go lower than -144 dBFS (24-bit) then it is just wasted hard drive space, RAM and CPU. The lower I have ever seen in the real world is about -121 dBFS with line inputs and nothing plugged in.

Sure, put a higher spec'd converter in but don't try to fool the ill informed with bigger numbers. It is insulting. At 32-bit integer, you will gain nothing in quality but lose in other areas.
I do agree with you regarding 24 vs 32 bits capture, that in IRL, that's not what makes a difference. So I will clarify what I was aiming to communicate when I wrote about possible sound improvements...

What I mean is (and that didn't come through in my first post I admit) that one could hope that the newer converter chip here hopefully will provide some "better" sound through perhaps improved filtering, decimation and "other processes that improve sound" (as you can tell I don't have enough technical knowledge to know what goes about in a converter )? I just hope/believe this converter will actually sound "better" compared to their old ones (I don't think they just threw in another 8bits and be done with it without improving other things at the same time). I guess future blind comparisons is the only thing that could tell
And this has, as you correctly point out, nothing to do with 24 vs 32 bit isolated in itself.

But marketing-wise is where I disagree with you... A company must differentiate themselves to stay relevant, and this is to a big extent accomplished with marketing. And marketing needs to be kept simple to get the message across.
In this case, specs like SNR, DR, jitter values etc. would tell a lot more about theoretical sound quality, but you would've lost your potential customers right there with too technical jargon.
The simple way of communicating this from a marketing perspective that people can relate to is simply by writing "32 bit converter". Because this is something customers can relate to as they've seen this is something used by everyone else in the industry for decades.
Sure enough, marketing insults everyone's intellectual every now and then.

But let's try not to digress too much into marketing principles and ethics
Old 3rd October 2019
  #27
Gear Addict
 

All of the marketing on the "32-bit" business is rather vague. They're not telling us what exactly is 32-bit. Is it the converters, or just the internal processing?

Wonder if the UR-RT line is still sonically better, due to the Neve transformers.
Old 3rd October 2019
  #28
Gear Addict
 
SV7107's Avatar
It's a shame they haven't updated the UR28M.
Old 4th October 2019
  #29
Gear Nut
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by doom64 View Post
The entire reason someone would want to record at 32-bit integer would be for the very low digital quantization noise floor. Every six decibels (give or take, I think it's 6.02 dB exactly) is equal to 1 bit.

If the analog noise floor doesn't even go lower than -144 dBFS (24-bit) then it is just wasted hard drive space, RAM and CPU. The lower I have ever seen in the real world is about -121 dBFS with line inputs and nothing plugged in.

Sure, put a higher spec'd converter in but don't try to fool the ill informed with bigger numbers. It is insulting. At 32-bit integer, you will gain nothing in quality but lose in other areas.
This is interesting and to understand their actual dynamic range, looked up their manual which discloses specs, and for the UR22c its about 102db on the inputs and 106db on the outputs, which are in line with other entry-level audio interfaces.


So how is the 32bit depth meant to improve the sound quality when its not even maxing out the 24bit depth dynamic range?
Attached Thumbnails
AES 2019: Steinberg Launches UR-C Series of USB 3.0 Audio Interfaces-screen-shot-2019-10-04-9.38.11-am.jpg  
Old 6th October 2019
  #30
Lives for gear
 

Yet more low end junk that will probably barely work to prey on beginners and students. RME, MOTU, and Apogee are eating these guys for breakfast. Everyone they burn with every new junky product leads to multiple lost customers.

So pretty much just slightly better sound than a Focusrite Scarlett with the same ****ty usb drivers only now it’s usb 3.1 so it won’t have the same compatibility as sticking with usb 2.0. The best use of previous Steinberg usb stuff was using the ur824 as an 8 channel adat pre ime. I don’t know anyone who gambled buying the new thunderbolt thing they made because it was so much money and their prior hardware was spotty. Who is buying the Neve branded ones anyway? I’ve seen more of the awful Audiofuse thing than those.
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