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Jay Kahrs 2nd October 2002 10:16 PM

Interesting sounds
 
What are your tricks for getting interesting & non standard sounds from instruments? One of my favorite things to do with drums is setup a 57 or whatever facing away from the drums and run it into a small guitar amp which I keep near the drums. Then I mic the amp and run it to it's own track. The amp is also picked up by my outside kick, overheads and room mics. To save mics what I'll sometimes do is split the mic that's feeding the amp and feed one output of the splitter to the control room which goes to tape like a regular room mic and the other to the guitar amp. That also opens up the possibilty of using a condensor to feed the guitar amp.

So what are you doing? Anyone making a singer sing into cymbals or the inside of an oven? (good acoustics in there) jkthtyrt

planet red 3rd October 2002 05:53 AM

Recently for an intro to a song I recorded a seperate track of snare verb, reversed the track and timeshifted it before the snare hit. So you'd hear a backwards reverbed snare going into every snare hit. Then I put a delay on the regular snare track timed to 8th notes. Hard to describe the sound, but it was pretty cool and very spacey.

Drumsound 3rd October 2002 05:53 AM

The old studio had a small but tall room with beautiful reverb. I'd often put a mic high on a stand as well as a close mic for guitars. Once my old band was doing a very dark, slow, brooding song. We put the mic as high as we could and had the singer sing up to it. It sounded great.

Last year I did a song with a band that had some long "AHAAAAs." We decided to have the singer sing into a Manhassett music stand and I pointed the mic (Neumann M50) at the stand. It's not noticeably odd, but is has "something."

Jax 3rd October 2002 07:51 AM

When I could still play my drums at home, I once mic'ed up the piano (which was across the room) strings with two 4050's and the lid open. I turned the piano so the lid would reflect the drum sounds down into the piano. I had two bricks ontop of a shoe (so the pedal wouldn't get scratched) holding down the sustain pedal. This made for an extremely eery, huge, Bartok-esque atonal sounding stereo reverb. I wish I could have a piano to do this in my live room but it would take up too much space. Highly recommended if you have a piano!

grimm

The other killer reverb I got was particular to this little turkish djembe-like drum my friend gave me from his travels. When I was recording a 4 piece instrumental acoustic guitar/percussion group, I stuck a mic inside the narrow hourglass end of the drum and it gave off a spooky high-pitched howl, kind of warbling tone, like a singing pterodactyl or something. grimm grimm

I've miked other resonating instruments for reverb/effects sounds, but those two are the best I've gotten so far.

jajjguy 3rd October 2002 06:20 PM

I placed a radioshack tie-clip mic inside the soundhole of an acoustic guitar, just let it hang from the wire. gave a very boomy sound that worked well in that particular lo-fi arrangement.

Cannon Fo So 4th October 2002 08:32 AM

Greenbullet on top of a water bottle or in one of the lemonade cartons i am always drinkign throughout the day. Put paper towel down before that one though. Sherman Filterbank usually on any mic I am not farmiliar with in the studio into a nicew mic pre cause i enever sem to like any odd mic techniques unless it can be classed upo with a good mic pre. I find its the key to makeing any experiment sound right. I also have wired up as of the other week my harmon kardon sound sticks and sub woofer as a mic, it soooooooo rules. They sound so ********. I cant wait to try the subwoofer on a kic II am sure it will sound as nasty and plastic as these sound.

moon_unit 19th October 2002 12:50 AM

This is a cool thread, and needs to be B-U-M-P-E-D.


I like to take an extra mic, and put it somewhere in the room, or in a surrounding room . . . anywhere, and listen for a spot that sounds particularly cool. About 99% of the time I'll wind up junking the track, but hey, at least it's there.

I've gotten interesting sounds sticking an extra room mic in a fish bowl . . . In a clothes hamper facing the wall . . . in a dryer.

My favorite . . . and this one is from when I used to do a lot more drugs . . . mezed . . . was when I re-amped a drum kit, facing the fire place, sticking a cheap mic in the fire place about 5 feet up the chimney.

That actually sounded pretty cool, if you can believe it.

imacgreg 19th October 2002 01:10 AM

When recording guitar, aside from the my usual close miced 57 or whatever, I like to mic a reflective surface somwhere near the guitar amp. In my old room, there was a big mirror in a hall with wood floors. I've miced the mirror with my Modified MXL 2001 and gotten some cool sounds.

I haven't experimented with it much, but I like to put mics in adjacent rooms to whatever I'm tracking and nearly shut the door all the way. I really wanna try this with drums.

Ian

Jay Kahrs 19th October 2002 01:24 AM

Cool, that way you get the low end. I don't know if it'll work but I've always liked that sound. Then again, I like lots of low end.

imacgreg 19th October 2002 02:48 AM

I can't remember who it was, but someone once said that they really like room mics placed so that the sound has got to bend around a couple walls, etc. From my limited experience with this technique, I like it as well. Anyone have any samples of drum (or anything) room mics that couldn't "see" the source?

Ian

e-cue 19th October 2002 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by imacgreg
I can't remember who it was, but someone once said that they really like room mics placed so that the sound has got to bend around a couple walls, etc. From my limited experience with this technique, I like it as well. Anyone have any samples of drum (or anything) room mics that couldn't "see" the source?

Ian

Rumor has it that the drum breaks on Phil Colin's "In the Air Tonight" where some mics that were hooked up and put in a closet to get them out of the way, and they un-muted them just in those "CHUM-CHUM CHUM-CHUM CHUMCHUM" breaks for the massiveness.

I once reamped a guitar cab (with like 7 extention cords) and pointed it into a water drainage and placed a mic on the next gutter opening (about 20 XLR's) and a reverb. Pissed the whole neighborhood off, but it was the closet thing to the "grand cayon" we could come up with. We've been looking for alternative permanate ways to do this ever since: Auratone on the sewer pipe and a PZM on the toliet, a perm speaker in a hidden sewer manhole and perm mic in another, etc...

Curious G 19th October 2002 03:35 PM

On the last album we took a 14" Burmese gong and warped the sound by fist striking it and then dipping it into a bucket of water. We sent that into the a big stereo verb and only used the return. Nice, big, dopplery, pitch shifting kind of effect....

subspace 19th October 2002 04:55 PM

I do most of the standard "experiments", but not as often as I should. Got a nice drum sound with two 57s a while back, one was an inch above the beater side rim, pointed at the throne, and the other was down the hall with the door open. The hallway is nice, it runs 20' from the far end of the tracking room around a corner to the control room door. One wall is unpainted sheetrock, the other is unpainted block, the floor is concrete, and the ceiling is a metal duct running the length of the hall - has a sound to it.

I've done lots of mechanical filtering for guitar parts, from the obligatory cardboard tube taped to a 57 to "horn-loading" one in a toilet bowl whilst I was doing some emergency plumbing.

Came up with a cool effect while trying out that cheap Behringer omni. I smash a ride cymbal to get a long ring out and slowly move the mic along the surface of the cymbal. It's kind of a light saber sound that works nicely for swells in a mix.

An old favorite is replaying stuff through NS-10s flipped around to face the control room glass and re-recording that through a mic facing the back wall. Then repeat the process 5-10 times, always playing back the newly re-recorded signal. After a few passes, all the details are lost and your just left with the frequencies that are reinforced by the room modes and the speakers themselves. It's a ghostly sound I like to add to sparse arrangements or ominous passages.

Dave Martin 19th October 2002 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by jajjguy
I placed a radioshack tie-clip mic inside the soundhole of an acoustic guitar, just let it hang from the wire. gave a very boomy sound that worked well in that particular lo-fi arrangement.
Actually, that used to be one of the standard acoustic guitar recording methods in Nashville, using either a Joe Mill mic or one of the little Sonys. In those days it was fairly common for everyone but the drummer to be out in the room - piano, guitar and steel amps - and that method gave a certain amount of isolation to the acoustic. Of course, you have to EQ the **** out of it to make it useable...

Dave Martin 19th October 2002 05:31 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Drumsound

Last year I did a song with a band that had some long "AHAAAAs." We decided to have the singer sing into a Manhassett music stand and I pointed the mic (Neumann M50) at the stand. It's not noticeably odd, but is has "something."

Hey, I did an acoustic like that last week; we wanted the sound of a resonator guitar and didn't have one. So I miked the music stand in front of the guitar with 1 KM184. Not really a resonator guitar sound, but strange enough to fit the bill, especially when I I did more horrible things with the EQ...

Steve Smith 19th October 2002 06:28 PM

Quote:

Anyone making a singer sing into the inside of an oven?
Apparently Elton John did this once and got a good song out of it... :)

Jules 19th October 2002 06:55 PM

I heard you can get a great soul singer if you put a duck into an oven untill it's bill withers!

mezed

Jules 19th October 2002 07:02 PM

I like to put a D112 into the side 'carry handle' hole of a 4 x 12 cab. This requires EXTREME bass roll off and insane narrow frequency HF & HM boost (I alway use a Focusrite 215 as pre & surgical eq tool). IMHO it adds a unique semi distant 'non fizzy shred' that I like on extreme, distorted GTR sounds when blended in with the main 'on speaker' mic(s)

yuktyy

cymatics 20th October 2002 06:56 PM

One wall of my drum room is framed about 3 feet away from the outide wall of the building. The electrical panel is back there so I had to put a door in the midle of the wall to allow access to that space. I was left with this creepy cavity behind the wall that I affectionately call 'the gimp closet'. I like to put a 57 or an SM81 (or whatever isn't being used) in there and squash the crap out of it with a distressor. Just a touch of that blended in with the drums makes my shoebox of a drum room sound almost like a real 'live room'

- jon

Jay Kahrs 20th October 2002 07:29 PM

My room is kind of but not totally dead, more on the neutral side like a living room or bedroom. So, what I usually do is take my drum room mics and feed them to a short reverb. It's a pretty good way of faking a bigger room sound.

I did a quick drum overdub yesterday in the midst of all the guitar madness. I was going to put the room mics up behind a gobo but never got around to it. The bass drum pedal broke and we wanted to get the stuff on tape quick rather then **** around with the sounds for an hour.

Jay Kahrs 20th October 2002 07:36 PM

Has anyone seen the movie Hedwig and the Angry Inch? That's where the oven comment came from.