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OwensDrumming 5th March 2014 09:48 PM

Great Recording Snare Drums
 
Hey guys,

I'm looking for a nice snare drum that sounds great recorded and is really versatile. I have a 6.5x14 DW Collector's Series Maple VLT already which I love for the deeper sounds, but I'm looking for something with a bit more crack, similar to the snare sound on Steely Dan's Everything Must Go album. I don't care if it's metal or wood as long as it sounds good. Thanks

gravyface 5th March 2014 09:58 PM

Any Ludwig Acrolite. Cheap, awesome, flexible.

Bradovic 5th March 2014 10:03 PM

Indeed, very cheap 2nd hand. If money is no issue i would look at a Black Beauty or something

Etch-A-Sketch 5th March 2014 10:09 PM

Noble & Cooley - Products

Noble and Cooley SS Classic snares. One of the most recorded snare drums in history.

tman 5th March 2014 10:16 PM

GMS Revolution Snare drum. Wood with metal liner. The aluminum 6.5x14 is ridiculous!!

wcx08 5th March 2014 10:24 PM

90% of how a snare drum sounds is going to depend on who is playing it and how they tune it. I've been playing drums for 20 years, and I've spent far more time anyone needs to spend with drums, heads, hardware, shells, plies, diameters/depths, tunings, etc. And I've come to the conclusion that even the best player can make the ****tiest snare drum sound good.

If I were you, I'd pick up a Ludwig Supraphonic 402. It can be used in literally any type of recording or musical style, depending on how you tune it. It's made of aluminum and it's durable. And it's also the most recorded snare drum of all time. And it's not too expensive.

Funny Cat 5th March 2014 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gravyface (Post 9913588)
Any Ludwig Acrolite. Cheap, awesome, flexible.


Yes. I highly recommend the Acrolite. There are some videos floating around YouTube comparing the Acrolite to the Black Beauty and the Supraphonic. The Acrolite sounds just as good, IMO. Remember, just about any decent snare drum can sound great depending on how you tune it and how you hit it. And yes, they are extremely flexible too. The amount of sounds you can get from an Acrolite are astonishing.

OwensDrumming 5th March 2014 10:40 PM

The Black Beauty is what I was thinking about getting. Will the 5" depth give me too much bottom? I don't want it to be too deep sounding because I already have the DW for lower pitched stuff.

Funny Cat 5th March 2014 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OwensDrumming (Post 9913731)
The Black Beauty is what I was thinking about getting. Will the 5" depth give me too much bottom? I don't want it to be too deep sounding because I already have the DW for lower pitched stuff.


The guy I shared my old studio with had a nice Gretch kit with a fantastic sounding Black Beauty. I can't remember if it was the 5" or 6.5"? But I have an Acrolite now and at a fraction of the cost, I can match the sound of the BB with my Acrolite. The BB is a little more of a "looker" though ;0). Can't go wrong with the Acrolite, BB or the Supraphonic. They all record well.

wcx08 5th March 2014 10:58 PM

The reason I recommended the supraphonic 402 is because it's very similar to the Black Beauty, but much cheaper. I'd be surprised if most people could tell the difference between the two in a listening test.

JulianFernandez 5th March 2014 11:03 PM

Wcx is right... Right now Supras are a no brainer (they´re around 100 bucks used, crazy!). BB if you can afford it...
And again... The snare is just the 5% of the overall sound you´re hearing... It´s ALL about the drummer...

Sebastian N 5th March 2014 11:26 PM

a black beauty and a cherry bomb and you can get any snare sound you like. plus, if it sounds too deep, change the mic. just because most people will put a 57 on it and call it a day doesn't mean you have to. one of the guys we often record is a great drummer but has rather a strange whack on the snare and he always needs a lot of work on it afterwords. other guys i just have to put the fader up and that's it.

gravyface 6th March 2014 12:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OwensDrumming (Post 9913731)
The Black Beauty is what I was thinking about getting. Will the 5" depth give me too much bottom? I don't want it to be too deep sounding because I already have the DW for lower pitched stuff.

If anything, the 6.5" shell will have more bottom/body to the sound; it'll also take a bit more energy to excite the bottom head/snares (why I usually put a higher strand count on > 6.5 shells).

jerry123 6th March 2014 02:18 AM

These are the nicest snares I have ever heard. Or any kits for that matter.

Baker Street Drum Company • For Sale

You totally get that "oh that's how they get that sound" vibe from them.

More instruments should be made with this amount of care.

andychamp 6th March 2014 03:32 AM

I regularly rent one particular, hammered 6.5" BB for sessions at our studio.
Usually the drummers want to do the whole session with it, once they've tried it. At least two of them got their own afterwards.
Styles include Jazz, Pop, Indie, Folk, Hard Rock and Metal.
If I had the cash, I'd buy it right away.

chrisso 6th March 2014 10:49 AM

The 6.5" Black Beauty is an absolute classic and very versatile.
The 402 Supra is also excellent and cheaper of course. Either one are studio standard drums.
As good, but much more expensive are N&C SS Classic and Craviotto.
You could do any studio date on the planet with a 6.5" BB, a Supra, an N&C solid maple and a Craviotto (Dark Cherry 6.5" is amazing).

OwensDrumming 6th March 2014 05:57 PM

How do you feel about wood vs metal snares?

Musiclab 6th March 2014 06:06 PM

the best snare drums I've had the pleasure to record were a Ford, DW Craviotto, and a Pearl Masters custom. Acrolite's sound fine also.

dylanr 6th March 2014 07:31 PM

As a general rule a metal snare will be brighter, have more attack and overtones than a comparable dimension wood snare, which you would generally call "warmer". Beyond that, all the different types of wood and metal also have their own characteristics.

Having said that, occasionally you'll find a snare of any material that defies the usual logic.

Whether you want wood or metal in the studio is purely and aesthetic decision, not a case of any material being 'best' for studio work.

Back on the list of good studio snares, not yet mentioned here are Rogers Dynasonic snares. I've mainly used the CoB. They are over-priced at the moment so I don't suggest they're good value, but $$ aside they are good workhorse snares.

JulianFernandez 6th March 2014 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisso (Post 9915042)
The 6.5" Black Beauty is an absolute classic and very versatile.
The 402 Supra is also excellent and cheaper of course. Either one are studio standard drums.
As good, but much more expensive are N&C SS Classic and Craviotto.
You could do any studio date on the planet with a 6.5" BB, a Supra, an N&C solid maple and a Craviotto (Dark Cherry 6.5" is amazing).

Chris, how many snares do you bring to a session? How about cymbals? Do you like to change tuning of the snares or just changing the snare when looking for a different vibe... Cheers!

chrisso 6th March 2014 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OwensDrumming (Post 9915938)
How do you feel about wood vs metal snares?

As a personal statement I generally prefer wood, but both are needed if you want to be a studio drummer IMO.
Actually, by far the best sounding snare I own is a 1920's Black Beauty (brass). But my favourite snares to play are wood (N&C and Craviotto).

chrisso 6th March 2014 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JulianFernandez (Post 9916559)
Chris, how many snares do you bring to a session? How about cymbals? Do you like to change tuning of the snares or just changing the snare when looking for a different vibe... Cheers!

More snares and cymbals than I need.
I think four snares would be a good minimum though.
A studio staple metal (BB or Supra), a great sounding middle of the road wood (N&C or Craviotto) and a couple of character alternatives - vintage Radio King, Ludwig Mahogany, Premier 2000, Ochletree. Stuff like that.
I'm a Zildjian endorser, so would typically carry at least two sets of hi-hats, three rides, a selection of crashes. Minimum would be two rides (one washy, one more dry), two pairs of hi-hats (one bright, one softer pair) and four or five crashes from 16" to 19".

Etch-A-Sketch 7th March 2014 02:23 AM

Nobody has mentioned it yet, but the Tama starphonic bell brass snare drums sound phenomenal when recorded.

Also, i've recorded several mapex endorsees (you can see some pics in the photo section of my GS profile) and they have these brass and steel hammered-shell snare drums that sound really good. Actually most of the Mapex snare drums sound good when recording but I remember the hammered ones sounded good enough to make me ask which snare drum the drummer just switched to.

chrisso 7th March 2014 03:22 AM

Lot's of snares sound good.
Yes, The Tama Bell Brass is legendary. The only problem is the legendary version of the drum is almost impossible to find and $$$$ when you do (unless renting of course).
I feel the 1920's Black Beauty is the ultimate studio snare, but again $$$$.
So I think the deal is to throw out some achievable suggestions, of which Mapex is I suppose.

JulianFernandez 7th March 2014 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrisso (Post 9916668)
More snares and cymbals than I need.
I think four snares would be a good minimum though.
A studio staple metal (BB or Supra), a great sounding middle of the road wood (N&C or Craviotto) and a couple of character alternatives - vintage Radio King, Ludwig Mahogany, Premier 2000, Ochletree. Stuff like that.
I'm a Zildjian endorser, so would typically carry at least two sets of hi-hats, three rides, a selection of crashes. Minimum would be two rides (one washy, one more dry), two pairs of hi-hats (one bright, one softer pair) and four or five crashes from 16" to 19".

Thanks, man... Do you take your 1920´s BB to sessions too? I would keep it at home just to be sure that nothing could happen to it! :lol:

wcx08 7th March 2014 07:17 AM

I'll say it again because I don't understand why everyone is overlooking it: the Ludwig Supraphonic 402. Especially if everyone is so goddamn obsessed with the Black Beauty...They're almost the exact same drum but a fraction of the cost. It's the most recorded drum in history. ****ing John Bonham played one, exclusively. What more do you want! ;-)

unclerico12 7th March 2014 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JulianFernandez (Post 9913797)
Wcx is right... Right now Supras are a no brainer (they´re around 100 bucks used, crazy!). BB if you can afford it...
And again... The snare is just the 5% of the overall sound you´re hearing... It´s ALL about the drummer...

+1 on allll DAT :)

chrisso 7th March 2014 08:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wcx08 (Post 9917992)
They're almost the exact same drum but a fraction of the cost.

Well no they aren't almost the same drum, and they don't even sound the same. But yeah they are great and I've mentioned the 402 in just about every post in this thread.

chrisso 7th March 2014 08:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JulianFernandez (Post 9917985)
Do you take your 1920´s BB to sessions too? I would keep it at home just to be sure that nothing could happen to it! :lol:

The whole point for me is to record it.
All my best gear goes to sessions. That's why I have it.

Hans A 7th March 2014 08:19 AM

i like the acrylic Fibes snare.