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jugglingj0hn 9th June 2006 08:06 PM

Aspiring mastering engineer
 
Greetings everyone I registered so I could ask this, I am an aspiring mastering engineer. I am 21 years old and soon I am going to be recording a local band because I figure this is probably the best way to get started, then I will see if I can sit in with the mastering engineer when we go to get the album mastered. Just a question for the mastering engineers, where were you in your audio career at around my age, and would you have any advice for me as an aspiring mastering engineer as to things I can do to help me reach my goal of becoming one?

Thanks in advance,

-John

bob katz 10th June 2006 12:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jugglingj0hn
Greetings everyone I registered so I could ask this, I am an aspiring mastering engineer. I am 21 years old and soon I am going to be recording a local band because I figure this is probably the best way to get started, then I will see if I can sit in with the mastering engineer when we go to get the album mastered. Just a question for the mastering engineers, where were you in your audio career at around my age, and would you have any advice for me as an aspiring mastering engineer as to things I can do to help me reach my goal of becoming one?

Thanks in advance,

-John

Sitting in with the mastering engineer is an excellent way to learn, John. When I was 21, I was recording local bands direct to 2 track! There was no remix. That was serious training in all areas, including learning how natural, live music sounds. And when some mastering had to be done (mostly corrective EQ), I learned ALL about the frequency ranges that could be manipulated to improve (or screw up) my own recording, which I knew very well and could easily hear the degradation. I suggest a good exercise for you is to learn to identify each of the bands of a 1/3 octave equalizer blindfolded! That's a good start.

Masterer 10th June 2006 12:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jugglingj0hn
Greetings everyone I registered so I could ask this, I am an aspiring mastering engineer. I am 21 years old and soon I am going to be recording a local band because I figure this is probably the best way to get started, then I will see if I can sit in with the mastering engineer when we go to get the album mastered. Just a question for the mastering engineers, where were you in your audio career at around my age, and would you have any advice for me as an aspiring mastering engineer as to things I can do to help me reach my goal of becoming one?

Thanks in advance,

-John

Become an assistant to a good mastering engineer and pay attention. You can't buy a better education than that.

Good luck.

jugglingj0hn 10th June 2006 11:39 PM

hey everyone, thanks for the posts!

Is there any sort of directory where i could find a mastering engineer in the area? (I live pretty far out there).

And when you say listen to live music and how it sounds live, do you mean say, a string quartet or orchestra? or like am amplified show, or does it matter.

and bob, i just started reading your book, thanks, it is great, although im having a bit of trouble digesting it all cause of my realitive inexperiance :)

-John

Masterer 10th June 2006 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jugglingj0hn
hey everyone, thanks for the posts!

Is there any sort of directory where i could find a mastering engineer in the area? (I live pretty far out there).

And when you say listen to live music and how it sounds live, do you mean say, a string quartet or orchestra? or like am amplified show, or does it matter.

and bob, i just started reading your book, thanks, it is great, although im having a bit of trouble digesting it all cause of my realitive inexperiance :)

-John

The Industry Sourcebook. It lists engineers by region.

Flpz 11th June 2006 03:56 PM

Care
 
1 Be really careful with your hearing at live performances, movies, airplanes etc.
2 Bob katz book is a bible.


Flpz

Jack the Bear 13th June 2006 07:59 AM

Yeah BK's book is a solid reference but as far as I'm concerned no book teaches you one of the most important aspects of the gig. Namely empathy for your client (both artistically and personally).


I think Chris has the right idea in suggesting you get an internship of some kind. Don't expect these gigs to be advertised. If you work hard and smart enough you'll find a place to learn the ropes. Then you will have to rely on yourself to get the gigs. The model is changing. The days of starting as the tea boy and working your way as the in house draw card are all but gone. Opportunities certainly exist.

You have to be as self-reliant as possible but there will always be people available to dispense advice and act as mentors. It's very important to have these.

Best of luck.

SoundEng1 13th June 2006 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flpz
2 Bob katz book is a bible.Flpz

Yup!kfhkh

Nancy M 19th July 2006 03:59 AM

Where are you located?
You're welcome to sit in at my place if it makes logistical sense.

Nancy Matter
Moonlight Mastering

Kayo 19th July 2006 08:53 AM

Quote:

You have to be as self-reliant as possible but there will always be people available to dispense advice and act as mentors. It's very important to have these.

Good point. Self reliance in my experience is on top of the list. And mentors are invaluble(respect).

Also, a deep love for all things audio. Not just music, but everything audible!! Most times viewing through analysis combined with an aesthetic point of outlook. Being a musician can help immensely too. An understanding of music from a musician’s point of view allows one to observe one’s creation with variable focal lenses. Things akin to time/notes/structure/tone/cadences/articulation/ etc... It all helps.jkthtyrt

dcollins 20th July 2006 06:36 AM

Find someone to apprentice with would be my advice. No substitute for hearing it in person as the knobs are turned...... Then after the session, you can axe some questions.

DC

blissmusic 20th July 2006 04:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flpz
1 Be really careful with your hearing at live performances, movies, airplanes etc.
2 Bob katz book is a bible.


Flpz

Yes this is critical . . . I own a pair of musician's earplugs, and I have some cheap foam earplugs . . . both have their own small carrying cases. Either one I carry with me most of the time. (FYI "musicians" earplugs can be obtained by visiting your local audiologist who can make custom molds for you, and the only reason you migh want them is if you're a musician or enjoy hearing the higher frequency range of sounds which foam earplugs tend to muffle out!)

If I'm in a venue and I don't have access to earplugs I'll get napkins and rip them into a small enough pieces that I can roll into my ears. One time I borrowed a cigarette and ripped off the filter . . . your ears are the one piece of gear that you can not upgrade, replace or fix.

Bob Katz's book is excellent. There is an exercise as well for identifying different frequencies which is presented in the book "Mixing With Your Mind" by Michael Stavrou that I recommend also.