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-   -   Brain freeze- EQ "part" of sound, sent to FX, mixed back in? (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/high-end/691397-brain-freeze-eq-quot-part-quot-sound-sent-fx-mixed-back.html)

Dirty Halo 23rd January 2012 12:35 AM

Brain freeze- EQ "part" of sound, sent to FX, mixed back in?
 
Hey guys,

I know this is obvious, but I'm having a brain freeze, can you please help me?

Here's what I want to do-

Held sustained synth chord...

Want to select part of that sound with an EQ and just send that EQ'd part to a different effect, then mix back in to create movement at different frequencies.

Working in Pro Tools (hybrid set-up with plenty of hardware and software tools, so for the sake of the question, assume I'll have the tool or version thereof)

What is the best tool for the job and what would be the workflow/set-up/signal chain?


I know I should know this, so I'm humbly asking you with a good dose of humility here!

Thanks!

-andrews peachh

NEWTON IN ORBIT 23rd January 2012 12:45 AM

Use a high and low pass filter on a dupe track? Filter above and below the freq range you need.

Send it out, effect it, return it. Automate it in and out.

john

Dirty Halo 23rd January 2012 03:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWTON IN ORBIT (Post 7473774)
Use a high and low pass filter on a dupe track? Filter above and below the freq range you need.

Send it out, effect it, return it. Automate it in and out.

john

Thanks! But, another questions (heh) shouldn't I then filter the opposite on the non-dupe track, so there's not two tracks of the same part (even if it's filtered and effected)?

I appreciate the help and your thoughts. kfhkh

I wonder if a sidechain approach could do a similar thing?

-a

NEWTON IN ORBIT 23rd January 2012 03:53 AM

You could maybe do a cut if it helps, but it's just going to work like adding eq ie adding amplitude in those freq's that you leave on the dupe track.

Besides that, the dupe track is effected anyway. You don't normally remove the entire dry signal from a track you are effecting do you? You mix 100% wet on a return with the dry original. Most of the time anyway.

Unless you are going for a swamped, all wet effect or something.

I would instead of filtering the the OG track, just try automating it down in the parts you bring in the filtered dupe at.

Try it, see if it works. If not, try filtering the other, if that doesn't get it, try removing and crossfading the other in and out.

You just have to try it, listen, and see.

There are lots of Lexicon morphing efx that do a similar thing BTW.

Good luck,
john

JimmyTurbo 23rd January 2012 01:01 PM

You could also just put the hpf and lpf on the send to the effect.
Same thing as Newton in Orbit said, but you don't have to duplicate your track.
Call me lazy... ;-)

NEWTON IN ORBIT 23rd January 2012 07:17 PM

True...I'm using a console and my sends have eq, so that's what I would do. Not sure what the OP is using.

john

Kiwi 23rd January 2012 09:19 PM

Some people are experimenting with using FX processing on different EQ bands, and some prefer to use a Crossover rather than EQ. This is because a Crossover splits the audio into seperate bands which can then be recombined with no apparant loss. (Whether that is important or not is another issue). They are likely to be linear phase which helps.

One way to do this is to use a multiband compressor, not for compression (unless you want to) but just for the crossover.

For example: clone or mult your track to 3 seperate channels. Insert a 3 band multiband compressor on each one, and mute two bands on each one, so each channel is for one band. Add FX to whichever band takes your fancy (usually big stereo FX on the high end, perhaps compression on the low end). Then recombine them to taste.

initialsBB 23rd January 2012 11:30 PM

You can also make a crossover by using any eq with a lowpass filter and then adding the output of that to a phase inverted copy of the dry track to get a high pass output from the same filter.

Drumsound 24th January 2012 03:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kiwi (Post 7477435)
Some people are experimenting with using FX processing on different EQ bands, and some prefer to use a Crossover rather than EQ. This is because a Crossover splits the audio into seperate bands which can then be recombined with no apparant loss. (Whether that is important or not is another issue). They are likely to be linear phase which helps.

One way to do this is to use a multiband compressor, not for compression (unless you want to) but just for the crossover.

For example: clone or mult your track to 3 seperate channels. Insert a 3 band multiband compressor on each one, and mute two bands on each one, so each channel is for one band. Add FX to whichever band takes your fancy (usually big stereo FX on the high end, perhaps compression on the low end). Then recombine them to taste.

Larry Crane from Tape Op is a huge fan of having a crossover in the rack for just such things. I really need to take that advice.