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-   -   "people who play electronic drums are not real drummers" (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/drums-/563055-quot-people-who-play-electronic-drums-not-real-drummers-quot.html)

takman 22nd December 2010 07:50 PM

"people who play electronic drums are not real drummers"
 
I hate when i hear that. grrr

What about guitarists who play electric guitars?

Keyboard players?

Electronic drums are just as real as acoustic drums. Neither is "better" than the other. each has its pros and cons.

Oli P 22nd December 2010 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by takman (Post 6139058)
I hate when i hear that. grrr

What about guitarists who play electric guitars?

Keyboard players?

Electronic drums are just as real as acoustic drums. Neither is "better" than the other. each has its pros and cons.

Maybe they are electronic drummers....who cares?? boing

yoshimodular 23rd December 2010 02:20 AM

When I started making music, almost 20 years ago, electronic music was not real music... (in Spain)

joeq 23rd December 2010 06:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by takman (Post 6139058)
I hate when i hear that. grrr

to be honest, I never heard anyone say that. Ever. Until this thread, anyway.

He still has to wield his sticks and feet to the same standard as any other drummer. It not like he is pushing a button and a sequencer is making the notes.


Quote:

Electronic drums are just as real as acoustic drums. Neither is "better" than the other.
well there I have to disagree. gooof Pads that spit out a sample when struck are not analogous to say an electric guitar, which still has a vibrating string and frets at its core.

acoustic drums ARE better heh

but I would never think that the choice of an inferior instrument would reflect on the musician himself. Especially drums - which are really a form of controlled noise.

Man, I have seen cats who can take on the best, playing on spackle buckets.

Pawel 23rd December 2010 03:12 PM

It's all in the dynamics and in the feeling: you can't master real drums dynamics if you play always on an electronic kit, just as you can't play properly an acoustic guitar if you always play on an electric one.

Drums especially, because while on the guitar the positions are the same, with the electronics drums you tend to put those little pads closer together than they are on real drums. It's also less fatiguing because of the strong rebound (and the softness of mesh heads on v.drums or similar).

It's too simple to sound good on an electronic kit, and that's addictive in a bad way. To make a real drumkit sound good by hitting it properly is another story.

Outdaw 23rd December 2010 04:33 PM

(1) Electronic drums are not 'real drums' - as in 'acoustic drums'.
(2) Acoustic drums came first (by many thousands of years) and so have the right to be casually referred to as 'real' drums.. as opposed to...
(3) ..... electronic drums which are electronic drums, which makes them different to real drums (acoustic drums).
(4) This does not mean electronic drums are literally less 'real' - they are still real - (they are not imaginary) and they are still capable of producing sounds (typically percussive sounds).
(5) This also does not mean that people who play them are not 'real' - they are still real and tend to be also referred to as drummers - or 'e-drummers'.
(6) However the techniques are very different ....
(7) .... as are the expressive and sonic possibilities...
(8) .... although there is much overlap.
(9) And they all lived happily ever after.
(10) The end kfhkh

william_cross 23rd December 2010 04:39 PM

Since drummers are not musicians anyway, the whole distinction is rather moot.heh

RTR 23rd December 2010 04:49 PM

I have been playing REAL drums for over 30 years and PREFER my E-kit right now to get tracks recorded faster..so there goes that MYTH out the window!!

joeq 23rd December 2010 09:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by william_cross (Post 6141864)
Since drummers are not musicians anyway, the whole distinction is rather moot.heh

there you go! gooof

Draw the Moral 24th December 2010 02:30 PM

"people who play electronic drums are not real drummers"
 
I've heard this said before, but it's really just kinda silly.

I would love to have a handmade Walnut Sonor kit with Istanbul cymbals just like the next guy...but since I have two small kids and I don't have an acoustically isolated space, my TD9 is the sensible solution. I could be "purist" and just not play drums until I can have a "real" kit to use. Instead, I've chosen a very practical option that gives me a lot of real flexibility for recording, practicing and playing.

My acoustic kit is in storage, and I will certainly still use it in the future when we have the right space to do so.

I'm a big fan of thinking for myself and formulating my own opinion. The things I practice on the TD9 have translated perfectly to a real acoustic kit.

I've had lots of experience with Roland V-drums (but I can't speak for other brands).
Any honest drummer playing one of the higher end V-drum kits with mesh pads would have very little to complain about realistic feel. Are there differences? Absolutely...but not enough to go on a crusade about it.

Make music. Be happy.
They're great.


Posted via the Gearslutz iPhone app

BradLyons 24th December 2010 02:32 PM

BUT at least now drummers are considered people! heh

cortisol 24th December 2010 05:35 PM

Real drums are excellent for expressive dynamic playing especially for the hands. But as someone who plays double kick, E drums let me hear and connect with my feet better than through playing an acoustic kick.

On my E kit I can play for longer without hearing fatigue. Acoustic players can think of E kits as having a good effect on your playing like hitting a practice pad only it develops other aspects of your drumming.

99zulu 24th December 2010 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BradLyons (Post 6144850)
BUT at least now drummers are considered people! heh

Since when? The wife still feeds me at the same time as the dog and cat. I know my place.

I have and play an acoustic kit, but frequently record with my e-kit because it's faster to do so, and honestly I play the pads a little faster. They certainly aren't as expressive, but they ARE a little quicker. It's just simple math: tighter pads make for faster rebound meaning less power necessary, plus physical distance being lessened (each pad is mounted more closely together than I can get my toms)...it's just faster.

Not that I think they're a great substitute in a live situation, but they definitely have their place. Someone mentioned fatigue...great point there. I can kick on the edrums all damn day without ever feeling it the next.

Sure I could get similar results playing softer on the acoustic kit, but where's the fun in that?




All that said...I got the edrums when I knocked the wife up. It was a compromise. Everything I just wrote is shame-based rationalizations so I can continue to justify choosing harmony over awesomeness, but when the chips are down...hell yeah I prefer my Gretch maple shells. Always have, always will.

Bob Olhsson 24th December 2010 11:13 PM

I've learned that a lot of big records featuring E-drums were actually played by drummers and not sequenced, quantized or even played to a click.

gabriel_au 26th December 2010 01:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 99zulu (Post 6145978)
Someone mentioned fatigue...great point there. I can kick on the edrums all damn day without ever feeling it the next.

Sure I could get similar results playing softer on the acoustic kit, but where's the fun in that?



I have both an acoustic and en e-kit but to me it's the other way around. Where's the fun in having the e-kit do half the work for you?

I love the physicality, subtleties, response and imperfections of a real kit. Makes for more interesting recordings too!

edwonbass 26th December 2010 02:15 PM

I have both and I am not a drummer. I just got the e kit because I am not a drummer and I want to practice more without the threat of divorce. I can also lay down drum tracks faster when I'm writing my own stuff and fix mistakes because there are many. Besides, my one room studio isn't ideal for tracking drums. It's just a tool to get stuff done.
I am having fun with the e-kit and Addictive Drums but I still like having the option of recording real drums with my acoustic kit.

O.F.F. 26th December 2010 02:25 PM

Sly Dunbar either used to or still plays electronic drums and he is one of the best drummers ever.

joeq 26th December 2010 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by O.F.F. (Post 6149231)
Sly Dunbar either used to or still plays electronic drums and he is one of the best drummers ever.


Quote:

FCJ: Which do you prefer, acoustic or electronic drums?

SD: Well, last year time we toured Europe I used my electronic kit. I did not bring it to America this time. They both have their uses, but I prefer the acoustic kit, its more organic.

http://blogs.sfweekly.com/shookdown/Sly%20Dunbar.jpg

AudioWonderland 27th December 2010 04:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pawel (Post 6141639)
just as you can't play properly an acoustic guitar if you always play on an electric one.

This is just not true.

Pachikara 6th January 2011 03:01 PM

I love accoustic as well as E kits, but I prefer E kits honestly cause the "art" of tuning the heads is not a art for me, in fact boring!

Bob Olhsson 6th January 2011 08:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pachikara (Post 6187230)
...I prefer E kits honestly cause the "art" of tuning the heads is not a art for me, in fact boring!

Back in the '60s and '70s tuning drums was part of every recording engineer's job!

joeq 6th January 2011 09:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Olhsson (Post 6188379)
Back in the '60s and '70s tuning drums was part of every recording engineer's job!

and oddly, not part of the drummer's job!

BLUElightCory 6th January 2011 11:36 PM

The original quote is just one of those things people say who love the sound of their own voice. It's obviously a ridiculous statement.

Bob Olhsson 7th January 2011 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joeq (Post 6188550)
and oddly, not part of the drummer's job!

Not that odd considering the fact that we were expected to record 4-6 songs in three hours. House drums helped us out a lot with that.

djanthonyw 7th January 2011 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by takman (Post 6139058)
"people who play electronic drums are not real drummers"

Don't sweat it man, it's just plain ignorant for people to get caught up in what gear someone is using. All that matters is the end result.

CB_Photo 11th January 2011 04:14 PM

An electronic drum is not a percussion instrument, it is a triggering device used to send a digital file to a D/A converter. One might was well use a QWERTY keyboard and get the same results.

Batchainpuller78 11th January 2011 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by djanthonyw (Post 6189071)
Don't sweat it man, it's just plain ignorant for people to get caught up in what gear someone is using. All that matters is the end result.

Nope... look acoustics or electromechanical and digital/electronics there is a ton of difference.

Imagine Medeski, Martin & Wood playing on a E drum and using Nord leads instead of his Grand Piano, Hammond B3, Hohner D6 Clavinet, Wurlitzer, Arp Solina, Mellotron. etc... it would sound half as sweet and it would limit Them severely in the expression and multitude of sounds they are able to get from the real deal.

Of course the statement that 'people who play E kits are not real drummers' is false. I agree with that.

takman 11th January 2011 05:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CB_Photo (Post 6205721)
An electronic drum is not a percussion instrument, it is a triggering device used to send a digital file to a D/A converter. One might was well use a QWERTY keyboard and get the same results.

but you are triggering samples that were recording using real drums.....well in most cases, depending on what sound you are looking for.

but with programs like addictive drummer...are they not real percussion sounds?

takman 11th January 2011 05:25 PM

i bet 98 percent of the people out there cant tell the difference between a drum track recorded with E-drums, using a good quality program like addictive drums....and a recording of the real thing.

And the technology and sound of these programs is only getting better.

Batchainpuller78 11th January 2011 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by takman (Post 6205913)
i bet 98 percent of the people out there cant tell the difference between a drum track recorded with E-drums, using a good quality program like addictive drums....and a recording of the real thing.

And the technology and sound of these programs is only getting better.

really depends on the style of music and the playing.