Gearslutz

Gearslutz (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/)
-   So Much Gear, So Little Time (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-much-gear-so-little-time/)
-   -   another question on recording electric guitars (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/so-much-gear-so-little-time/439358-another-question-recording-electric-guitars.html)

prophet 12th November 2009 10:24 AM

another question on recording electric guitars
 
when recording electric guitars for a rock kind of thing, would you always go for a stereo recording? or rather record mono and then double- or multitrack where necessary?

if recording stereo: I've got 2 SM57, any advice on mic placement? would you go for the same position on both speakers?

stayouttamalibu 12th November 2009 10:45 AM

If you're going for a big modern rock sound, I wouldn't suggest recording electrics in stereo, rather do multiple mono takes and pan them wide. I would however suggest using multiple mics per take. A great method if you have 57s is one of them on the grill pointed straight at the cone, and the other right on the grill next to the first one, pointed diagonally towards the cone, forming kind of an arrow if that makes sense. Blend to taste but usually the angled one higher in the mix with the straight one in there just enough to get some of the ultra high bite sounds great.

vijsolo 12th November 2009 10:52 AM

I would also agree on the "arrow" mic positioning. However double or multy track is still required. Without this the sound gets "flat" no mater how "fat" you hear it form the amp.

Cheerz!!

prophet 12th November 2009 10:56 AM

just to make sure I understand correctly: you'd record 2 mics to one track, right? in that case, leveling the 2 mics for the sound would have to be done using the mic preamp, and the record both mics to one track?

erasedcitizen 12th November 2009 12:09 PM

I would record the 2 mics to seperate tracks and balance them while mixing.

Black Shadow 12th November 2009 12:45 PM

Try to find a used 421. It really helped me to get good distorted guitar sounds, especially in arrow combination with a 57.

kafka 12th November 2009 12:58 PM

I've never liked stereo guitar. It just doesn't make sense to my brain when I hear it. I'll sometimes record with a pair of dissimilar mics, and pan them very slightly, just to widen out the sound in the mix, but that's as far as it goes. Similarly, I'll sometimes play through a pair of dissimilar amps. But to me, since they're right on top of each other, the sound is still mono.

Anselmo 12th November 2009 01:13 PM

I would suggest doing a search here, lots of info on this subject... That being said - go double on heavy dist guitar!

Unclenny 12th November 2009 02:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kafka (Post 4774904)
I'll sometimes play through a pair of dissimilar amps. But to me, since they're right on top of each other, the sound is still mono.

This is generally what I do for my electric guits.

I always track to two separate mono tracks. Sometimes it's two mics on one amp, but most often it is two distinctly different small tube amps. I like to EQ and level each of those tracks to taste and then bounce them to a stereo track. That track gets panned in pretty close together on one side or another until it sums well in mono but still has some width and depth.

Sometimes I'll even bounce that finished stereo track back on to a mono track and bring it up back under the stereo track where I want that guitar to sit in the mix.

Or....sometimes there's nothing like a straight up beefy mono track to highlight a guitar part.

RTFMPleez 12th November 2009 03:15 PM

I would suggest multiple takes, as long as the player is tight. Use 2 mic's for each take say a 57 and a ribbon or 57 and 421. Blend to taste and pan wide. You set yourself up for many possibilities this way and you could always take a mic out if its not working. kfhkh

prophet 12th November 2009 09:47 PM

when double-tracking, would you use the same guitar, or double with a different guitar?

frankencat 12th November 2009 10:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stayouttamalibu (Post 4774707)
...I would however suggest using multiple mics per take. A great method if you have 57s is one of them on the grill pointed straight at the cone, and the other right on the grill next to the first one, pointed diagonally towards the cone, forming kind of an arrow if that makes sense. Blend to taste but usually the angled one higher in the mix with the straight one in there just enough to get some of the ultra high bite sounds great.

This works great with a 57 and a Royer 121.

larry b 12th November 2009 11:19 PM

The "arrow" double mic setup works really well with a ribbon mic and an SM57. I use my Cascade Fathead II w/Lundahl for this all the time.

Alternately for more top end bite, an LDC such as the C414 works really well with the SM57 also.

Record both tracks individually, and then blend to taste...