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-   -   how to you all get into musicbuisness ? (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/high-end/39332-how-you-all-get-into-musicbuisness.html)

chester 8th August 2005 10:52 PM

how to you all get into musicbuisness ?
 
hi,

i'm mad interested how all of you get into the buisness/how to you found a place to work at and get money to live from.

was it done by a practical course, or did you study engineering or you got a bunch of luck ?

i want to hear how you success yourself and found a place to work at, and what you work at now.

thanks for all replys


greets chester

Kestral 8th August 2005 11:14 PM

Step 1: Bend over

Step 2: Take it

The lucky ones get to "Use lube" before Step 1

heh

chester 8th August 2005 11:21 PM

hehe kfhkh

Lynn Fuston 8th August 2005 11:47 PM

Scrub toilets at a studio. Eventually the first engineer will croak from too much coffee, cigarettes, sleepless nights, and french fries eaten over the console. Then you just push him out of the chair and take your rightful place. Normally this will take less than 10-15 years.

Then the cycle repeats.

heathen 8th August 2005 11:55 PM

Great answer Lynn so true.Or you could sell a kidney and half your liver,buy your own top quality gear do a course and then practice for 10 years.Gotta start somewhere.

Jules 8th August 2005 11:59 PM

The first pound I made in the music biz was from playing the Marquee club here in London in 1978. I still have that old pound note somewhere, signed by my band members. That would technically be my entry into 'the biz'. hittt

It's all been downhill ever since... diddlydoo

Lynn Fuston 9th August 2005 12:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by heathen
Or you could sell a kidney and half your liver,buy your own top quality gear do a course and then practice for 10 years.Gotta start somewhere.

Whatever it takes.

Actually, I've heard from reliable sources that all it takes to be an engineer these days is a credit card. A little practice before you hang out a shingle wouldn't hurt either, but that's optional.

Lynn Fuston 9th August 2005 12:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jules
It's all been downhill ever since

I've been "pounded" a few times in this business myself.

Honestly, find a studio that needs something done (shouldn't be hard-all studios have a list as long as your arm of things that never get done) and hang out without pay. With their permission, hopefully. After a few months (maybe years), they will realize you are invaluable and decide to give you half of minimum wage for eight hours a day and you can work the other eight hours a day for free. Then one day, the chief engineer will be wanting to leave town for a holiday and the band will want to keep recording and he'll say the only option is the young guy who's no engineer but knows how to push play and record. And he has a key to lock up when they're done.

You'll work until 5 AM, hopefully won't erase anything in the process and your career will be underway. (Until the studio manager comes back from her holiday, finds out what happened and gets mad and fires you on the spot.) If you rebound from that glorious success (the high and low point of your one day career) hopefully within a year or two, you'll be able to make a living at it.

That's how it was for me.

Jules 9th August 2005 01:03 AM

Friday, 3rd week at studio as intern..

Studio boss - "What are you doing this weekend?"
Me (mumbles some plans) + smiles politely
Studio boss (listened to my plans) "No you are not! You are needed on some sessions here"
Me (cancels plans and said goodbye to 'regular world & friends' for the next 6 years)

recorderman 9th August 2005 01:43 AM

Well first, I graduated High School. That is where I completed my primary education and learned to write properly; i.e. grammar, spelling and punctuation. I am seeing in the current generation of twenty somethings (more or less) a proclivity to ghettoize there language. I do not know wether this is out of ignorance, stupidity or a herd-like desire to fit in and be "cool". In any-case i would not bother calling you after receiving a cover letter to a resume that was crafted as eloquently as your post was. But that's just me.

Benjy King 9th August 2005 02:25 AM

Grammar, etc.
 
I just assumed the post was a joke.

murp 9th August 2005 02:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by recorderman
... a proclivity to ghettoize there language.

I believe that should "their language". heh

recorderman 9th August 2005 03:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by murp
I believe that should "their language". heh

DOH!!! How right you are..another example of instant karma.

Jay Kahrs 9th August 2005 06:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by recorderman
DOH!!! How right you are..another example of instant karma.

John Lennon was right, instant karma will always get 'ya. LOL

But yeah...Lynn's right on the money. That's pretty much how I got my start in the business. If you’re looking for fortune and glory, I'd take hints from Indiana Jones and be an archeologist.

Or get an egg cart, open a dry-cleaning shop...

cajonezzz 9th August 2005 06:27 AM

well, I've been "making a living" playing music for 23 yrs... I'm not sure if I'm actually In the music business yet.

soundeslutz 9th August 2005 07:40 AM

i forced myself in. fell in love with studios and recording, learned as much as i could, annoyed alot of engineers with quetsions, worked my ass off, saved money, bought some gear, started recording everyone i could, just goes from there, planning ot open my own studio within the next few months

Kingtone 9th August 2005 07:48 AM

This is my most commonly asked question when people find out what i do for a living...
I dont think you 'get into' the music business.
Do what you do as best as you can do it... and make friends everywhere.
Dont even think about doing it for money... and all of a sudden... there you are... "in the music business"

... now very helpful i guess... but everyone i know in this hobbystry... er.. industry... never had a big break or 'entry point' ... you just do what you love.. ie music.. do it well.. and you seem to find yourself there.

it also helps to NOT be a complete arse!... although.. maybe that is a requirement for
A+R ! heh

chester 9th August 2005 07:50 AM

a big round till now. the experience Lynn postet is the one i so often heard from, thats makes me angry. wworried wworried wworried
well, but i know i'm hard enough myself to give up 'real world and friends' abduction
hopefully there will be some open door for me too outhere, and i probably will hit the french fries eaters off of them seats. heh

i will start some practical course soon. i will share my experiences here.

maybe any other expreriences left ? diddlydoo

greets chester

Fletcher 9th August 2005 12:58 PM

It was simple to get into this business... just make sure you have absolutely no other training nor skills than music/engineering and you won't have a choice but to make a living at music/engineering.

You kind of have to [as Jules pointed out] give yourself over to having no other life... but it comes with the territory.

BTW... as long as we're breaking recorderman's balls on "grammar, spelling and punctuation"... I certainly hope that an "h" was omitted and not an "a"

Quote:

Originally Posted by recorderman
Well first, I graduated High School. That is where I completed my primary education and learned to write properly; i.e. grammar, spelling and punctuation. I am seeing in the current generation of twenty somethings (more or less) a proclivity to ghettoize there language. I do not know wether this is out of ignorance, stupidity or a herd-like desire to fit in and be "cool". In any-case i would not bother calling you after receiving a cover letter to a resume that was crafted as eloquently as your post was. But that's just me.


clunk 9th August 2005 02:35 PM

if we're breaking balls then - 'their' rather than 'there' surely.

Lynn Fuston 9th August 2005 04:36 PM

I don't mean to sound too discouraging. I always tell people that ask "No matter how many people there are in the music business, there's always room for one more."

When I came to Nashville back in 1978, the last thing Nashville needed was one more engineer. But you make your way and try to do your best.

The real key is studying everything and everyone you can. I heard a saying years ago that has proven true through my career.

Success happens when Opportunity meets Preparation.

Make sure you are prepared when the door opens and then walk right in, or sit right down. It will be extremely obvious after the first day (or the first hour) whether or not you have what it takes.

Lynn Fuston 9th August 2005 04:39 PM

One other thing. Meet everyone you can and find out their strengths. Being successful doesn't require that you know everything. But it often requires that you know people that do. Understand your weaknesses and surround yourself with people that know more than you do. Being able to answer all the questions yourself is less important than knowing who to call when you need an answer.

Igotsoul4u 9th August 2005 07:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jules
Friday, 3rd week at studio as intern..

Studio boss - "What are you doing this weekend?"
Me (mumbles some plans) + smiles politely
Studio boss (listened to my plans) "No you are not! You are needed on some sessions here"
Me (cancels plans and said goodbye to 'regular world & friends' for the next 6 years)


ARRRGGGGG. I'm trying to forget all that!!!!!!

C.Lambrechts 9th August 2005 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jules
Friday, 3rd week at studio as intern..

Me (cancels plans and said goodbye to 'regular world & friends' for the next 6 years)


That kinda attitude is unfortunately hard to find these days. Everywhere ... not only the music bizz........

rlnyc 9th August 2005 10:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chester
hi,

i'm mad interested how all of you get into the buisness/


didn't really want to grow up, and by and large, it has worked.

best,
rlnyc.

recorderman 9th August 2005 11:00 PM

Ouch..my balls sure hurt today. boing

Kestral 9th August 2005 11:08 PM

I may not know how to get into the music business, but I know how NOT to get into the music business:

ie.

- Trying to Autotune a song without knowing the key to the song
- Sound Replacing the overhead drums
- Offering to pay $10 a drum sample and then being a complete buttmonkey to anyone and everyone

wworried mezed

kudzu 10th August 2005 12:21 AM

pre teens, listening to "rubber soul", "help" AND "kinda blue".....learning to live bounce between cassette decks.......early teens hanging out @ studios.......first engineering session @ 16.......platinum record by 22......still learning @ 38......."THE BEAT GOES ON" boing

moeses 10th August 2005 01:46 AM

umm am i the only person who would rather spend their weekends mixxing then not?

for me it's either be in the studio, or be out getting in to bad situations

i'd rather be mixxing for some assholes then running from police

Kestral 10th August 2005 01:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moeses
umm am i the only person who would rather spend their weekends mixxing then not?

for me it's either be in the studio, or be out getting in to bad situations

i'd rather be mixxing for some assholes then running from police

Think outside the box (no pun intended)

I'd rather meet women and hang out in the sun than either mix with assholes or deal with black man shooting donut scarfers.