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-   -   Looking for Reliable Acoustic Caulk in Irl / Uk? (https://www.gearslutz.com/board/studio-building-acoustics/1324675-looking-reliable-acoustic-caulk-irl-uk.html)

OshMurr 7th September 2020 06:07 PM

Looking for Reliable Acoustic Caulk in Irl / Uk?
 
Can anyone recommend a reliable acoustic caulk available in Ireland / UK that's not going to fail in a year or two?

There's lots on the market but which are the good ones?

Thanks in advance

Starlight 7th September 2020 08:17 PM

Each tested product will have a Shore A hardness value but you may need to look up the more detailed product specifications on a web site rather than on the product in a shop.

I believe values from 25 to 35 fall in the range that acoustic caulks have. For example, I used Mapeflex PU45 which is working great for me. It has a Shore A hardness value of 38, so just outside the range on the stiffer side. It allows for up to 20% movement.

coreyspencer 7th September 2020 09:47 PM

Theres no such thing as "acoustic caulk". Dont buy into that snake oil b.s. Save your money for things that actually matter. Using regular construction adhesive or even silicone will work just fine.

Theres no special acoustic properties that can be formulated into a caulk . There is no special "sound good" polymer blend of ingredients.

Kyle P. Gushue 8th September 2020 12:16 AM

Do not use construction adhesive, it will make the assembly worse.

It is acceptable to use non-hardening silicone or butyl caulking which is typically available at any building supply.

OshMurr 8th September 2020 12:02 PM

Thanks guys, I'll take all this into account

coreyspencer 8th September 2020 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kyle P. Gushue (Post 14958429)
Do not use construction adhesive, it will make the assembly worse.

It is acceptable to use non-hardening silicone or butyl caulking which is typically available at any building supply.

I was referring to using the construction adhesive instead of the infamous green glue. Some kind of adhesive is needed inbetween sheathing. To stop vibrations. Then the silicone to seal the seams.

JF Sebastian 8th September 2020 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coreyspencer (Post 14959588)
I was referring to using the construction adhesive instead of the infamous green glue. Some kind of adhesive is needed inbetween sheathing. To stop vibrations. Then the silicone to seal the seams.

Sorry to disagree, just for the sake of accuracy, standard construction adhesive is not a substitute for Green Glue at all!
No adhesive is strictly "needed" inbetween sheeting.

coreyspencer 8th September 2020 04:11 PM

do you know what happens when you dont glue down subfloor to your floor joists? After a while you will start to get "creaky floors", as the fasteners loose grip, or material shrinks or swells. Walls or ceilings will do the same thing ESPECIALLY in a room designed to contain vibrations.

Thats if your into that kinda stuff. I personally dont beleive that glueing your sheathing together or onto studs will make all too much of a difference in the end result.

Starlight 8th September 2020 05:22 PM

I believe the OP was asking about caulk. The discussion is now about glues and CLDs (constrained layer damping materials), both different materials to caulk.

Adhoc 8th September 2020 09:22 PM

As long as it stays soft over time, the joint is around 20-25% flexible it would serve the purpose. Hardness after curing 35-50 Shore A is OK. If elangation at break is mentioned instead of Shore A in a data sheet, something like 400-600% should be OK. Higher strength isn't reallly what you are looking for, these are usually less flexible.

I like MS polymers, they have no foul smell, are non toxic and are paintable, also resistant versus UV / sunlight and come in a variety of of hardnesses / strengths. (Silicone is not paintable and polyurethane may degrade over time in sunlight.) There are many different brands, shouldn't be a problem to find something in GB / Ireland. Some different types of sealants:
https://www.idealsealants.com/a-brie...o-sealants-i18

Kyle P. Gushue 8th September 2020 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adhoc (Post 14960548)
(Silicone is not paintable and polyurethane may degrade over time in sunlight.)

Ive never used it, but they do make 100% silicone caulking that is paintable. Here's an example

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Silic...7000/100012232

Just out of general info, Rod "never uses acoustic caulk"


What should I use to fill gap around doorframe for best isolation?


Quote:

Originally Posted by coreyspencer (Post 14959588)
I was referring to using the construction adhesive instead of the infamous green glue. Some kind of adhesive is needed inbetween sheathing. To stop vibrations. Then the silicone to seal the seams.

As JF said, the two are not interchangeable. And neither GG nor construction adhesive "stop vibrations".

Since the greats Eric Desart and Rod Gervias have covered the topic i will just link their thoughts.

Rod/eric desart on green glue, great read.

https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/v...php?f=24&t=650

Rod-Adhesive is only a disadvantage

Double drywall

Rod never uses construction adhesive in his builds

Isolation: Wall structure stability

Rod green glue vs adhesive

Any Green Glue Users care to comment?


Rod don't use regular glue for drywall, glued mass acts like a single sheet, unglued layers do not.

Double drywall



Quote:

Originally Posted by coreyspencer (Post 14959735)
do you know what happens when you dont glue down subfloor to your floor joists? After a while you will start to get "creaky floors", as the fasteners loose grip, or material shrinks or swells. Walls or ceilings will do the same thing ESPECIALLY in a room designed to contain vibrations.

Thats if your into that kinda stuff. I personally dont beleive that glueing your sheathing together or onto studs will make all too much of a difference in the end result.

If creaks are an issue there are techniques to fix it, including headless screws, and screwing up from the underside of the sheathing. The Wyle report specifically states that adhesive on studs makes the assembly worse.

IR-811 shows floor assemblies, and tests with screws not partially unscrewed.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...os9NspjzpXzPq0

JF Sebastian 8th September 2020 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kyle P. Gushue (Post 14960766)

Rod-Adhesive is only a disadvantage

Double drywall

Rod never uses construction adhesive in his builds

Isolation: Wall structure stability

Rod don't use regular glue for drywall, glued mass acts like a single sheet, unglued layers do not.

Double drywall

+1 Kyle, thanks for bringing these posts to the conversation.

OshMurr 9th September 2020 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Adhoc (Post 14960548)

Thank you, that's very helpful :)

coreyspencer 9th September 2020 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kyle P. Gushue (Post 14960766)
Ive never used it, but they do make 100% silicone caulking that is paintable. Here's an example

https://www.homedepot.com/p/GE-Silic...7000/100012232

Just out of general info, Rod "never uses acoustic caulk"


What should I use to fill gap around doorframe for best isolation?




As JF said, the two are not interchangeable. And neither GG nor construction adhesive "stop vibrations".

Since the greats Eric Desart and Rod Gervias have covered the topic i will just link their thoughts.

Rod/eric desart on green glue, great read.

https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/v...php?f=24&t=650

Rod-Adhesive is only a disadvantage

Double drywall

Rod never uses construction adhesive in his builds

Isolation: Wall structure stability

Rod green glue vs adhesive

Any Green Glue Users care to comment?


Rod don't use regular glue for drywall, glued mass acts like a single sheet, unglued layers do not.

Double drywall





If creaks are an issue there are techniques to fix it, including headless screws, and screwing up from the underside of the sheathing. The Wyle report specifically states that adhesive on studs makes the assembly worse.

IR-811 shows floor assemblies, and tests with screws not partially unscrewed.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...os9NspjzpXzPq0

In general construction practices. Whether it be residential or commercial. We glue the subfloor down to the joists as well as nailing with 2 3/8" nails To make sure that over time the floors dont creak..... this is a fact. Whether it applies to acoustics in some way, im only assuming that itd be related. Other wise there wouldnt be a product like green glue.

JF Sebastian 10th September 2020 04:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coreyspencer (Post 14962387)
Other wise there wouldnt be a product like green glue.

Just to clarify Green Glue is neither a glue or a caulk. It has a very specific use in acoustics, it is being designed to act as a CLD compound (Constrain Layer Damping)
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cons...y%20themselves.

Kyle P. Gushue 12th September 2020 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coreyspencer (Post 14962387)
In general construction practices. Whether it be residential or commercial. We glue the subfloor down to the joists as well as nailing with 2 3/8" nails To make sure that over time the floors dont creak..... this is a fact. Whether it applies to acoustics in some way, im only assuming that itd be related. Other wise there wouldnt be a product like green glue.

Acoustical and residential construction emply different methods in some cases. Gluing the floor down to the joists reduces its isolation. The wyle report tested and confirmed this.