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qwertysimo 27th June 2020 11:01 AM

Soundproofing a garage workshop
 
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Hi,

few months after discusstion in my thread Soundproofing an apartment workshop I got a chance to rent a more suitable space for a fair price and I took it. I still want to soundproof it to minimize noise coming out!

I have pretty decent idea on what I need to do although I would like to ask you for advice with addressing the weakest point - windows.

The room is 3 x 7 m (10 x 23 ft) and on both short walls there are windows and glass blocks in the upper quater. I will not buy and install new windows in rented space. As I will not spend there any prolonged sessions, I decided to sacrifice the daylight and completly block both window walls. Attaching picture for your reference.

The left side is made of fixed rectangular glass blocks. The right side is a tilt window with hinges on the bottom. Before I build a proper drywall in front of the existing wall, I want to add a mass to those glass parts, like putting and OSB/MDF sheet to cover whole glass section.

Thing is, that the glass block part is not completly flat, neither is the whole steel construction, plus there are raised hinges (I can cut cutouts), and the OSB/MDF sheet cannot be installed without leaving a small gap, lets say 12 mm (1/2"), maximum 25 mm (1").

My concern is that added OSB/MDF sheet can create a tripple leaf. Is this the case?
Any ideas how to remove the gap?
Fill the cavity with sand that will perfectly adopt all irregularities?
Spray foam (but the foam is no mass)?


Thank you.

Boris

Starlight 6th July 2020 07:07 AM

One thing I remember learning was the insulation between leaves needs to be left uncompressed as compression will start to bridge the two leaves and provide a flanking path - the more compressed the insulation is the worse it will be. Taking that information and using to your advantage, if you fill the gap with insulation but make sure to compress it it will both absorb the unevenness of the irregularities and bridge the glass with the board and leave the glass and board working together as a single leaf.